The Future – Which Door to Enter

first_imgQUESTION: Good day Mr. Armstrong, I have been a student of yours since 2001 and am always amazed at your work. I am not one that can afford to go to your seminars, but would love to know all that you discuss there. Could you write a book about what all is discussed there?My question is, I am in the process of moving from California, due to politics and their financial mismanagement. I am in escrow, but I am afraid of where to put my money from the sale of my home, it is my retirement, as I have put all of my savings into the home over the years. I plan on moving to a location with lower taxes and lower home prices and purchasing a home much less in price and save the rest of the money in case social security runs out. Are banks going to be a safe place to put money, or maybe a high paying dividend stock, or should I just bury it in my new homes backyard?? This is really quite frightening as I do not want to be forced out into the streets as a poor person after working hard for 65 years! We are very, very frugal so do not need a lot of income, just do not want to loose what we have. Thank you so much, and sorry to bother you, as I know you are very busy.BillANSWER: U.S. banks will probably be safe in general for the next two years. Just anything you put in a bank, do not lock it in long-term. Stay short-term — 2021 is where things start to go nuts.As far as good equities, we will be in a position to look at that next year. As far as places, look at Texas or Florida. Florida has the better place for housing (homestead). Also, there is a high concentration of retired people in Florida. That provides greater resistance to dramatic changes. « Could the Great Depression Have Been Prevented? How the Rich Make Their Money »center_img Categories: Economics Tags: 2021, USD last_img read more

2019 Season Countdown 61 Giles Jackson

first_imgPrediction: Redshirt • Caught 63 passes for 1,254 yards and 13 touchdowns senior year; had 38 carries for 207 yards and three TDs, and added a 65-yard punt return for a score• Rushed 221 times for 1,586 yards and 22 touchdowns as a junior, while adding 21 catches for 324 yards and five touchdowns• Carried the ball only five times for 24 yards as a sophomore, but added 47 receptions for 842 yards and 13 touchdowns Jackson committed to Michigan in September of 2018. There was some talk about him being a running back at the time, perhaps spurred by his high school career: Either way, Jackson goes into the 2019 season with a chance to play wide receiver at Michigan. The departure of Oliver Martin might open some doors in that area, but the complexity and speed of the college game might hinder his immediate development as a summer enrollee. Ultimately, I think Jackson will end up redshirting, but he has the playmaking potential to work his way onto the field this fall. Giles Jackson (image via Twitter) Tags: 2019 season countdown, Giles Jackson From his sophomore year onward, his carries went from 5 to 221 to 38. His receptions went from 47 to 21 to 63. Perhaps his junior season position move to running back was a team personnel necessity, or maybe the coaching staff thought he could play running back before deciding that he needed to get ready to play receiver in college. Name: Giles JacksonHeight: 5’9″Weight: 179 lbs.High school: Oakley (CA) FreedomPosition: Wide receiverClass: FreshmanJersey number: N/ALast year: Jackson was a senior in high school (LINK). He caught 63 passes for 1,254 yards and 13 touchdowns, along with 38 carries for 207 yards and three TDs, and adding a 65-yard punt return for a score.TTB Rating:  1 0You need to login in order to vote last_img read more

Tradeshow talks with Steroplast

first_imgMay 4 2018 Tradeshow Talks with SteroplastBooth G01Why are Steroplast here at Health GB?We’re a Manchester company, based in Wythenshawe, and we manufacture and distribute medical disposables, pharmaceuticals and diagnostic equipment into seven different sectors. When we heard about Health GB we thought, if there’s going to be an exhibition for health in Manchester, it would be wrong not to be there.What product are you focusing on here at Health GB?This year Steroplast has been focusing on two different areas; emergency trauma and sport. Whilst continuing to provide for the first aid, emergency services, veterinary and medical sectors. We are very proud to provide the British Red Cross with all of their consumables, every single one of their ambulances are fully stocked with Steroplast products.Our trauma range has been growing over the past year, obviously since the Manchester bombing and other high profile incidents this has been an area that has demanded focus. We have been working on our own emergency bleed control kits and finding the best equipment for traumatic situations, such as tourniquets and trauma dressings. We’re trying to promote our bleed control kits as something that should not be ignored, and pricing them so that they can be placed in bars, pubs, shops, and basically anywhere with high footfall. So that if the worse should happen, our kits are there, and can be used to hopefully save lives.How do you stand out from other businesses in your field?Well, we have tried to design them so that any passerby could use them, even people without first response training could pick one up and help to save a life. The STAT Tourniquet works as you’d imagine a cable tie would, you just wrap around the wounded area and pull it to tighten. Then you can press the button, and this times how long it’s been on the individual. That way, when the individual gets to hospital the medics will know how long it’s been on their arm, and they will know the right decisions on where to go from there. Basically what we’re trying to do is make it easier for people to save lives, and that’s the job, isn’t it?last_img read more

Pharmacists can play key role in resolving treatmentrelated problems among undeserved people

first_imgJun 14 2018Pharmacist-delivered home medication management review service effectively resolves treatment-related problems in patients displaced by humanitarian crisis, according to a new study published in Research in Social and Administrative PharmacyAs global political conflicts continue to increase, more and more refugees are facing urgent challenges such as the unavailability of proper medical care. Many of the Syrian refugees now living in Jordan (the entire group accounts for one-tenth of that country’s population) are struggling with at least one chronic disease, placing tremendous strain on existing health and humanitarian resources as a result. A new study published in Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy demonstrates that pharmacists can play a vital role in closing treatment gaps for managing chronic health conditions among this underserved population.”Refugees around the world suffer multiple and complex health issues while health access is limited. This study provides important information not only regarding the health of refugees, but regarding the vital role that can be played by pharmacists in this emerging field,” commented the study’s lead investigator, Iman A. Basheti, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan, and Faculty of Pharmacy (Honorary Professor), The University of Sydney, Australia.The study identified the type and frequency of treatment-related problems (TRPs) for this population and explored the impact of a pharmacist-delivered Home Medication Management Review (HMMR) service on resolving the identified TRPs. Significant differences between the intervention and control groups were found with regards to TRPs’ outcomes at follow-up. The percentage of TRPs resolved/improved in the intervention group was 66.8 percent compared to 1.5 percent in the control group. Furthermore, the percentage of “no change” in the TRPs was found to be 19.7 percent in the intervention group compared to 94.1 percent in the control group.This single-blinded randomized controlled clinical study was conducted between May and October 2016 in three main cities in Jordan (Amman, Mafraq, and Zarqa), where the majority of Syrian refugees reside. The 109 patients who took part in the study were recruited from physicians’ clinics allocated for the refugees, had at least one chronic condition (more than half had hypertension and diabetes; many had dyslipidemia, cardiac illnesses, and asthma), and/or took five or more medications with at least 12 daily doses. Participants evenly divided into intervention and control groups. All were interviewed during home visits, and when intervention group members reported TRPs, pharmacists counseled them about their illnesses, medications, and adherence to treatment. The pharmacists’ treatment recommendations were delivered to the physicians for approval, modification, or rejection. Pharmacists conveyed the approved changes to the patients, who then visited their physicians for confirmation and evaluation. The conditions, TRPs, treatment recommendations, and outcomes were classified and assessed to measure the success of the interventions. This protocol was based on an Australian HMMR model.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchA large majority of the patients and physicians involved indicated satisfaction with the HMMR service provided through this study. Nearly 80 percent of the patients expressed positive reactions to the friendliness/courtesy of the pharmacists, clarity of information provided, level of knowledge, and quality of counseling/education they received, and amount of time required for treatment. All of the physicians believed that the HMMR service was helpful, three-quarters of them said they believed it is feasible, and 62.5 percent were happy with the clarity of the pharmacists’ recommendations.”The study confirms that the HMMR service can be translated and implemented for this special group population in Jordan, a developing country situated in a region of war and conflicts,” noted Dr. Basheti, who pointed out that 75 percent of the participating physicians believed such implementation was possible, with the caveat that professional remuneration is provided. This comes in line with the WHO recommendations supporting the implementation of the recently published report by the High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth, established by the United Nations Secretary in March 2016, and calling for “ambitious solutions to ensure that the world has the right number of jobs for health workers with the right skills and in the right places to deliver universal health coverage.” Preparing a skilled global health workforce that can deliver healthcare services in crises and humanitarian settings was also specified. Source:http://sydney.edu.au/last_img read more

NTU launches new research centers to prevent and treat diseases affecting Singaporeans

first_imgJun 19 2018Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has launched a suite of new research centers and laboratories to advance the prevention and treatment of the most pressing diseases affecting Singaporeans.The Population and Community Health Laboratories at the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (LKCMedicine), will seek to understand why these diseases occur. They will also develop more targeted strategies for early prevention and prompt treatment so that Singaporeans can lead healthier and more productive lives. LKCMedicine is a joint medical school of NTU Singapore and Imperial College London.The laboratories are in line with the Ministry of Health’s recent call to move beyond healthcare to boost preventive health by encouraging and empowering Singaporeans to take good care of their health, arrest the causes of ill health early and reduce the progression of long-term chronic diseases.Dr Amy Khor, Senior Minister of State, Ministry of Health and Ministry of the Environment & Water Resources, graced the official launch of the Population and Community Health Laboratories on Monday, 18 June 2018.Dr Khor was joined by Mr Lim Chuan Poh, member of the NTU Board of Trustees and Chairman of the LKCMedicine Governing Board, and Professor James Best, Dean of LKCMedicine.Located at LKCMedicine’s state-of-the-art Clinical Sciences Building at NTU’s Novena campus, the new laboratories consist of the Clinical Research Centre, Centre for Population Health Sciences, Centre for Primary Health Care Research & Innovation and the Exercise Medicine & Physiology Laboratory. (Refer to Annex A for more information on the Centers.)NTU President, Professor Subra Suresh, said, “As a Singapore medical school, LKCMedicine is a pillar of the national health system. We should leverage NTU’s unique expertise and infrastructure to drive health research and a deeper understanding of factors underpinning population diseases. Working together with the university’s multidisciplinary institutes will enable solutions that combine the best of science and technology to enrich the human condition. It is important that NTU, as a technologically-advanced and globally-recognized research university, takes the lead in translating research findings from bench to bedside, to improve Singaporeans’ quality of life.”Related StoriesApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsNew laboratories build on NTU’s research strengthsThe direction and objectives of the new Population and Community Health Laboratories are summed up in the landmark Health for Life in Singapore (HELIOS) Study. The 20-year study is hosted at the Clinical Research Centre.The study, led by LKCMedicine Professor of Cardiovascular Epidemiology John Chambers, aims to assess the health of Singaporeans to better predict and prevent chronic diseases, enabling Singaporeans to live healthier lives as they age.To date, 800 Singaporeans and Permanent Residents aged 30 to 84 have been recruited for this study of more than 10,000 people in the first phase. Their data will form a comprehensive resource that can improve disease prediction, early detection, prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. (Refer to Annex B for more information on the HELIOS Study.)Professor James Best, Dean of LKCMedicine said, “Together with our partners, the National Healthcare Group, we are investing in improving the health of Singaporeans. HELIOS is our flagship contribution to the national effort in precision medicine. These laboratories are dedicated to capturing extensive information about individuals, that will form a powerful database to improve the delivery of care for our aging population.”The Exercise Medicine & Physiology Laboratory will focus on studying the effects that exercise has on the health of people as they age. One study is investigating how long-term moderate to vigorous exercise alters cardio-metabolic risks in people of different ages.Preliminary results from this study suggest that a sedentary lifestyle can increase the risk of diabetes from a young age. They also demonstrate the benefits of promoting good exercise habits in the younger population as a strategy to address the healthcare challenges of an aging population.Results like these provide crucial information that underpins public health strategies aimed at protecting Singaporeans against common diseases.http://media.ntu.edu.sg/NewsReleases/Pages/newsdetail.aspx?news=00116c32-f405-4cc0-92f3-d63ec606c469last_img read more

Researchers develop 3D model of human placenta

first_imgAug 3 2018The placenta is the organ connecting mother and embryo. Its main functions are the exchange of nutrients, gases and metabolic products and the production of hormones and other substances essential for embryonic development. Placental malfunctions are the main cause of pregnancy complications and can lead to miscarriage and other serious disorders that endanger both mother and child. So far, the mechanisms underlying these disorders remain largely unexplained, not least because, up until now, there has been no reliable human cell culture model system. MedUni Vienna researchers have now successfully developed a 3D model of the human placenta. The 3D “in vitro” model of the early human placenta was produced in a collaborative project involving the research groups of Martin Knöfler from MedUni Vienna’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology) and Paulina Latos from MedUni Vienna’s Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology.First organoid model of the placenta – based on other tissue culture models”Over the last few years, 3D tissue culture models, called organoids, have rapidly been established for many different human organs. In most cases, these organoids consist of only a few cell types from the respective tissue and therefore have a simpler structure than the original organ,” explain the researchers. Working on this basis, the team from the Medical University of Vienna managed to develop an organoid model of the placenta, consisting of the prevailing placental cell population, so-called trophoblasts.Knöfler and Latos explain: “As a puretrophoblast organoid without blood vessels or connective tissue components, this model mirrors the trophoblast-specific placental structure in a Petri dish.” This was done by optimising the culture conditions that had already been successfully applied in organoid models of other tissues.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapySlug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’A significant advantage of the placenta organoids is their capacity for self-organisation, self-renewal and constant growth, stress the MedUni Vienna scientists, since they contain both stem cells and progenitors. Moreover, these 3D structures also contain the three main cell types of the human trophoblast population.The MedUni Vienna researchers were able to underpin the groundbreaking advantages of this organoid system with a study substantiating the role of the WNT signaling pathway (which is crucial for development and growth of many tissues) in self-renewal and differentiation of the trophoblast organoids. The organoid model system can also be pharmacologically and genetically manipulated. This opens up new possibilities for studying physiological and pathophysiological processes of the human placenta.”The fact that there were no self-renewing cell culture model systems available for the human placenta made it difficult, if not impossible, to study the causes of malfunctions. Establishment of the placenta organoid system will improve this situation significantly and will help advancing drug development and consequently medical treatments for dangerous gestational disorders,” emphasises Knöfler, one of the leading international experts in placental research and last author of the study.Source: https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-august-2018/3d-model-of-human-placenta-developed/last_img read more

Study finds link between degenerative eye conditions and Alzheimers disease

first_img Source:https://newsroom.uw.edu/news/eye-conditions-provide-new-lens-screening-alzheimer%E2%80%99s Aug 9 2018Alzheimer’s disease is difficult to diagnose as well as treat, but researchers now have a promising new screening tool using the window to the brain: the eye.A study of 3,877 randomly selected patients found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases – age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma – and Alzheimer’ disease.The results offer physicians a new way to detect those at higher risk of this disorder, which causes memory loss and other symptoms of cognitive decline.The researchers, from the University of Washington School of Medicine, the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Institute and the UW School of Nursing, reported their findings Aug. 8 in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.”We don’t mean people with these eye conditions will get Alzheimer’s disease,” said lead researcher Dr. Cecilia Lee, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the UW School of Medicine. “The main message from this study is that ophthalmologists should be more aware of the risks of developing dementia for people with these eye conditions and primary care doctors seeing patients with these eye conditions might be more careful on checking on possible dementia or memory loss.”The participants in the study were age 65 and older and did not have Alzheimer’s disease at the time of enrollment. They were part of the Adult Changes in Thought database started in 1994 by Dr. Eric Larson, who is at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute. Over the five-year study, 792 cases of Alzheimer’s disease were diagnosed by a committee of dementia experts. Patients with age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or glaucoma were at 40 % to 50% greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease compared to similar people without these eye conditions. Cataract diagnosis was not an Alzheimer’s disease risk factor.Related StoriesPortable device attached to smartphone can diagnose eye disease remotelyHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionStudy finds sex-specific differences in risk and progression of Alzheimer’s disease”What we found was not subtle,” said Dr. Paul Crane, professor of medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, at the UW School of Medicine. “This study solidifies that there are mechanistic things we can learn from the brain by looking at the eye.”More than 46 million older adults are affected by dementia worldwide and 131.5 million cases are expected by 2050, the researchers said. Alzheimer’ disease is the most common dementia,and discovering risk factors may lead to early detection and preventive measures, they said in their paper.Lee said anything happening in the eye may relate to what’s happening in the brain, an extension of the central nervous system. The possible connections need more study. She said a better understanding of neurodegeneration in the eye and the brain could bring more success in diagnosing Alzheimer’s early and developing better treatments.The researchers said several factors suggest the effects they uncovered were specific to ophthalmic conditions and not merely age-related phenomenon.Larson said for years Alzheimer’s researchers were focused on amyloid buildup in brain tissue, but that hasn’t brought much benefit to patients.”This paper is pointing to a new area of opportunity,” he said.last_img read more

Scientists uncover mechanisms responsible for development of fibrosis

first_img Source:https://www.helmholtz-muenchen.de/en/news/latest-news/press-information-news/article/44840/index.html Aug 10 2018Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an incurable lung disease of unknown origin with limited treatment options. Research suggests that the signaling molecule WNT5A plays a key role in the pathogenic process. Now a group of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München working with colleagues from the University of Denver have taken a further step towards uncovering the mechanisms responsible for the development of fibrosis: IPF is associated with the increase of extracellular vesicles that relay WNT5A signals to cells in the lungs. The study, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, proposes a further pharmacological biomarker and a possible therapeutic approach.Pulmonary fibrosis is associated with the increased formation of connective tissue in the lungs, resulting in scarring (fibrosis) of functional lung tissue. This leads to a decrease in the inner surface of the extremely fine alveoli and the extensibility of the lungs, which, in turn, impedes the intake of oxygen and the release of carbon dioxide. The result is impaired lung function. IPF is a particularly aggressive form of the disease that cannot be attributed to a specific cause. The symptoms worsen rapidly. Existing drugs can slow progression of the disease but are unable to stop it permanently.Research is therefore continuing to focus on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the pathological tissue changes associated with IPF. One approach that has been intensively pursued for several years now in the Department of Lung Repair and Regeneration (LRR) and the Institute of Lung Biology and Disease (ILBD) at Helmholtz Zentrum München aims to influence the so-called WNT signaling pathway. It is already known that the signaling molecule WNT5A is responsible for stimulating the proliferation of connective tissue cells in the lungs.Related StoriesSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyVesicles transport scarring signals The LRR Research Group headed by Dr. Dr. Melanie Königshoff has found that extracellular vesicles are very likely also involved in IPF. “Simply put, extracellular vesicles are tiny pouches released by cells that can contain a large number of messenger substances, such as proteins and nucleic acids,” describes Dr. Mareike Lehmann, one of the authors of the study. “They are an important means of communication between cells and organs and help to ensure that the substances reach completely new sites.”Until recently, it was unclear whether and how extracellular vesicles are implicated in IPF. “We were able to show in the study that increased levels of extracellular vesicles occur in IPF patients, which then act as carriers of WNT5A,” explains lead author Aina Martin-Medina. “We were also able to confirm these results in our experimental model.” In addition, the authors showed in Petri dish experiments that reducing the number of vesicles decreases tissue scarring.In further preclinical studies, the researchers now want to examine the suitability of extracellular vesicles as a pharmacological biomarker, as well as a possible therapeutic target.last_img read more

Slideshow Seven types of lightning—from the common to the bizarre

first_img NASA/ISS Related articles: Lightning doesn’t just produce breathtaking natural fireworks. It’s also responsible for starting thousands of dangerous wildfires every year. Researchers have long known that lightning strikes are correlated with higher temperatures—hotter summers often mean more wildfires. Now, new research published online today in Science suggests that with climate change, the United States could see many more lightning strikes each year: about a 12% increase, or 300,000 more strikes, with every 1°C rise in temperature. By the end of the 21st century, the rate of lightning strikes per year could increase by as much as 50%.In order to make this calculation, researchers relied on counts of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes within the contiguous United States. But cloud-to-ground isn’t the only type of lightning—it’s not even the most common. From ball lightning to volcanic lightning, here’s a tour of some of Mother Nature’s most startling displays.Think you can do better? Send your most electrifying photos of lightning to sciphotos@aaas.org for a chance to see your image published online! Solving the mystery of supercharged lightning nagelestock.com/Alamy Thechemicalengineer/Wikimedia Wild Horizons/UIG/Getty Images Dry lightning. Dry lightning, the result of very high altitude thunderstorms, is a major cause of forest fires. These high-altitude storms do create rain, but it evaporates before hitting land, setting the scene for a lightning-induced wi Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Arctic-Images/Corbis By Sarah CrespiNov. 13, 2014 , 2:00 PM Fir0002/Flagstaffotos (Flickr) Wild Horizons/UIG/Getty Images Cloud-to-ground lightning. Cloud-to-ground lightning is the kind most people think of when they hear “lightning strike,” but it’s actually not the most common type of lightning. Space lightning. NASA observatories are looking at lightning from a new vantage point—way above the clouds. This image of a lightning storm above Bolivia was taken from the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. In 2013, NASA sent a s ‹› Cloud-to-ground lightning. Cloud-to-ground lightning is the kind most people think of when they hear “lightning strike,” but it’s actually not the most common type of lightning. Email Intracloud lightning. This is the most common type of lightning and often looks like a disco party taking place deep in the clouds. Intracloud lightning happens when positively and negatively charged regions accumulate within the same clo Slideshow: Seven types of lightning—from the common to the bizarre Jeremy Michael/Flickr Catatumbo lightning. Lake Maracaibo in western Venezuela is home to the Catatumbo lightning, the most consistent series of lightning storms in the world. Lightning has raged on the lake at least 260 nights of the year for more than 100 ye Volcanic lightning. If you thought big explosions and fiery hot lava weren’t dramatic enough, why not add lightning into the mix? Lightning has been observed in the plumes of several different erupting volcanoes, including Iceland’s 2010 Ball lightning. One of the more mysterious forms of atmospheric fireworks, ball lightning looks like a drifting, glowing sphere of light. In 2012, researchers in China were able to record high-speed video of ball lightning and capture its Thierry GRUN/Alamy Fir0002/Flagstaffotos (Flickr) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Projected increase in lightning strikes in the United States due to global warminglast_img read more

Biochemists launch crowdsourcing site to combat bad data

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe “It’s become a really serious problem,” says Paul Workman, a chemical biologist and chief executive of the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London, who was a member of the expert panel. The upshot, say Workman and others, is that many probes produce spurious results that can lead researchers to wrong conclusions about the proteins and drug molecules they are studying. For example, some probes have been found to cause side effects, such as triggering chemical changes in proteins or causing proteins to clump together in aggregates that damage cells. And that, the panel argues today in a commentary in Nature Chemical Biology, leads to uncounted hours of wasted time, effort, and money on the part of biomedical researchers. Several years ago, for example, poor chemical probe data led researchers to pursue a final stage clinical trial on a cancer drug candidate called iniparib. Such trials typically cost hundreds of millions of dollars. In 2011 iniparib was deemed a failure after it was found to be less effective at hitting its target than initially thought.Despite such failures, researchers often continue to use faulty probes. Up to now, chemical biologists have relied on the normal self-correcting mechanisms of science—journal articles, reviews, and conference proceedings—to set the record straight. But they haven’t worked in this case. “The self-correction has not been effective enough,” Workman says. The issue, he says, is that few researchers have the time or expertise to keep track of exactly which probes are proving successful. Instead, when researchers look for a new probe, most simply go to Google Scholar and gravitate to the probes that have the most citations. But these are often the older, less reliable probes, Workman says. One such probe, known as LY294002, has had 30,000 citations since 1994 and 1100 since the start of 2014. However, Workman says, “It’s a terrible compound, 10 years out of date, with lots of off-target effects.” More accurate probes have been on the market for years, but researchers still use LY294002 because it appears to have a strong track record.Chemical biologists say they hope crowdsourcing will solve the problem. They have set up a new wiki site, called the Chemical Probes Portal, with backing from ICR, the Broad Institute, the Structural Genomics Consortium, and the Wellcome Trust. At the site researchers will be able to add annotations to different chemical probes, to ensure their colleagues have the most up-to-date comparative information they need. The effort could be a challenging one, because even studies that use the same probe often use it in different conditions and at different doses, says Kevan Shokat, a chemical biologist at the University of California, San Francisco. However, he adds, as long as researchers use the portal in an iterative way to steadily improve the understanding of different probes, it should help the community. “I do think that would be a good service,” Shokat says.center_img Email Chemists looking to design and test new medicines are awash in a sea of bad data, according to a report released today by an international panel of experts. The panel, made up of researchers from 46 nonprofit institutions, universities, and biotech and pharmaceutical firms, say they are setting up a TripAdvisor-like crowdsourcing portal to disseminate up-to-date information about chemical probes that they see as the heart of the problem.The issue with faulty chemical probes has been growing rapidly in recent years. These small, druglike molecules are used primarily to block the activity of specific proteins to determine their roles in biochemistry. Ideally, this helps researchers design drug compounds that perform similar functions but retain attributes needed for successful medicines, like nontoxicity and the ability to travel through the human body. Today, thousands of such probes exist. But most of them interact with nontarget proteins as well or have other unwanted “off-target” effects.last_img read more

Antivenom made from nanoparticles could eventually treat bites from any snake

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Not all antivenom is created equal. Different types of snakes produce different types of toxins. That means snake bite victims not only need to get a dose of antivenom as soon as possible, but they have to get the right one. Now, researchers report that they have devised nanoparticles that sop up a variety of common venom toxins in test tube studies, a key stride in coming up with the first ever broad-spectrum snake antivenom. The strategy could eventually be used to combat toxins from scorpions, spiders, bees, and other venomous creatures.“This approach to treating snake bite sounds quite promising,” says Stephen Mackessy, a snake biologist at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, who was not involved with the work. “If they can develop a family of specific particles to target the major toxin families specifically, then this approach would have real value as a therapeutic.”The lack of such a therapeutic is part of the reason that more than 100,000 people a year die from snake bites, mostly in Africa and Southeast Asia. That’s not the only danger. Venomous snakes bite an estimated 4.5 million people every year, nearly 3 million of whom suffer serious injuries, such as the loss of a limb. That’s because almost all snake bites occur in rural areas where people lack ready access to a clinic stocked with antivenom. And in many cases, victims receive the incorrect antivenom. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Producing conventional antivenom isn’t easy. The process starts by injecting an animal, often a horse, with a small amount of diluted venom from a particular snake. The animal’s immune system produces a mixture of antibodies capable of binding to and inactivating the toxins. Blood is then extracted from the animal, and the antibodies are purified and formulated for injecting into bite victims.But conventional antivenoms have several problems. For starters, producing antibody-based antivenoms is time consuming and expensive, making it difficult for drug companies to make money on their sale, says Ken Shea, a chemist at the University of California, Irvine, who led the new work. That has contributed to a recent worldwide shortage. The antibody formulations must also be refrigerated, making them less accessible in the poorest parts of the developing world where they are often needed most.So Shea and his colleagues are looking to nanotechnology for help. They previously designed nanoparticles capable of binding a powerful toxin in bee venom, known as melittin, and removing it from blood. But for their current work they wanted to create particles capable of binding not just one toxin, but many.Their target was a family of toxins known as PLA2 proteins. Snakes produce hundreds of varieties of different PLA2s, which range from mildly toxic to powerful neurotoxins. PLA2 proteins normally wedge themselves into cell membranes. Shea and his colleagues started with the notion that nanoparticles made from similar lipidlike molecules that exist in cell walls had a good chance of binding to a wide range of PLA2 molecules.But they didn’t make just one type of nanoparticle. Rather, they assembled a variety of different polymer building blocks that carried different chemical functions, such as having an acidic appendage, an alkaline sidearm, or being able to create a network of weakly interacting hydrogen bonds. They then assembled these components in different combinations and concentrations and carried out a chemical reaction that coaxed them all to form small, porous polymer nanoparticles. They incubated their nanoparticles with a cocktail of PLA2 molecules and isolated the nanoparticles that bound the PLA2s the best. Those nanoparticles served as the starting material for additional rounds of chemical optimization.After several such rounds, Shea and his colleagues had nanoparticles that bound tightly to a wide range of PLA2. They do bind some other proteins as well. But after incubating their nanoparticles with blood serum and then adding a mix of PLA2 molecules, the researchers found that the toxins pushed the other proteins out of the way, binding more tightly to the nanoparticles than anything else, they report this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.Shea notes that although he and his colleagues have yet to finalize their measurements on how well their nanoparticles bind to various PLA2 molecules, their test-tube results suggest that they could have a similar high affinity for PLA2s as their previous nanoparticles had for melittin, the bee venom protein that stopped the toxin in animal studies. He says that animal studies to test their broad-spectrum particle antivenom are expected to begin next month.If those prove successful, Shea says the next step will be to devise nanoparticles that bind to other common protein families found in snake venoms. “Eventually we’d like to have a cocktail of two or three or four nanoparticles optimized against the principle protein toxins,” Shea says. And because such a cocktail would consist of synthetic polymers, it would likely be cheap to make and wouldn’t need to be refrigerated. That could prove a boon for helping doctors quickly provide effective antivenom to snake bite victims, possibly even saving thousands of lives every year.last_img read more

Harvard Business School Clears Up Blac Chynas Confusion

first_imgYep, Blac Chyna allegedly was never using the cream even though she was pushing the product in Lagos, Nigeria. It was a sad twist considered 77% of women in Nigeria use skin bleaching creams. According to the World Health Organization, chemicals in skin bleaching creams can cause liver damage, reduced resistance to infections, anxiety, depression and psychosis.Chyna clearly has a psychosis even without the cream.SEE ALSO:Meet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s ClothesTrump-Supporting DA Calls ‘Ghetto’ Maxine Waters A ‘Bitch,’ Can’t Believe She Hasn’t Been ShotThis Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem Grievance Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Earlier in the week, Blac Chyna, announced she would be attending Harvard Business School. Well, the Ivy League university said that was a hard no for them, which points to more scam-like behavior from the reality TV star whose given name is Angela White.SEE ALSO: Kim Porter, Model And Mother Of Diddy’s Children, Dies“Harvard Business School Online has not admitted nor provided an acceptance letter to a person named Angela White,” the esteemed college said in a statement to TMZ. Blac Chyna’s application was supposedly approved Monday.“Where I’m at now is a stage of realization and growth,” the 30-year-old told TMZ at the time. “I want to be great for myself and my kids. School is going to help me take things up a couple of notches. People are always talking about me, might as well talk about the good. I’m excited for the next chapter.”Well, they probably aren’t talking about the good now.The business school program is a 40-hour, 8-week business analytics course aimed to help students develop a data mindset and the analytical skills to interpret and communicate data. TMZ wrote that Blac Chyna was made aware of the program via Christian Emiliano, who refers to himself as Social Media Renaissance Man. His email pitch read, “Our team will complete all the course work for you, all you have to do is take one test (we will provide you the study guide) and then take credit for the program.”TMZ claimed that Blac Chyna’s people “acknowledge they got Christian’s pitch, Chyna never hired him and decided to take the course on her own. Christian confirmed that to us as well.”As of Friday morning, Black Chyna had not responded to Harvard saying she was not accepted.Blac Chyna was involved in other foolishness back in November when she traveled to Africa to promote the offensively titled skin-bleaching cream, “Whitenicious x Blac Chyna Collection.” The alleged toxins cost $250.She had been babbling that she uses the skin cream, but it was later reported that she never once did.“Despite her partnership with Whitenicious by Dencia to roll out her ‘Whitenicious X BlacChyna Diamond Illuminating & Lightening Cream,’ she’s never applied it to her own skin. We’re told BC was presented with a business opportunity and offered good money to promote the cream — which goes for $250 per Swarovski crystals-studded jar — so she said yes,” TMZ wrote in November. US-SCHOOL-SHOOTING-PROTEST-POLITICS blac chyna , Harvard , Harvard Business School 95 Photos Of Black People Marching For Our Lives More By NewsOne Staff AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Reprogrammed cells could tackle brain damage

first_imgResearchers have converted astrocytes (red) into neurons (green) in a living mouse brain. Some see the approach as a potential alternative to transplanting stem cells (or stem cell–derived neurons) into the damaged brain or spinal cord. Clinical trials of that strategy are already underway for conditions including Parkinson’s disease and spinal cord injury. But Gong Chen, a neuroscientist at Pennsylvania State University in State College, says he got disillusioned with the idea after finding in his rodent experiments that transplanted cells produced relatively few neurons, and those few weren’t fully functional. The recent discovery that mature cells can be nudged toward new fates pointed to a better approach, he says. His group and others took aim at the brain’s most abundant cell, the star-shaped astrocyte.Astrocytes are glial cells, named for the misconception that they’re merely the brain’s structure-giving “glue.” In fact, they nourish and communicate with neurons and help control blood flow. After an injury, subsets of astrocytes proliferate, promote inflammation, and contribute to the formation of a scar. Many scientists think astrocytes’ effects on recovery are contradictory—some helpful and some harmful.”I cannot imagine another technology to be more efficient than using the neighboring glial cell” to repair the brain, Chen says. His group enlisted a harmless virus that, injected into the brain, infects astrocytes and introduces DNA that codes for NeuroD1, a transcription factor that activates genes typically expressed in neurons. The reprogramming apparently prompts other astrocytes to multiply, which he thinks might prevent the treatment from depleting the brain of astrocytes.The approach, under development in several labs working with various transcription factors, is “super provocative,” says Timothy Murphy, a neuroscientist at The University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, who studies how brain circuits change after stroke. But, he adds: “These cells need to survive, and they need to reconnect.”No group has yet shown that the reprogrammed cells do wire up into circuits to carry out the functions of lost neurons. But several have evidence that the cells take on key neural features. In the weeks after inducing a stroke in a mouse’s brain, Chen’s team saw reprogrammed astrocytes retract some of their starlike tendrils and begin to produce hallmark neural proteins. Reprogrammed astrocytes also appear to fire electrical signals and extend new fibers across the brain and into the spinal cord.Götz’s team, meanwhile, documented that newly reprogrammed neurons around the site of a stab wound resemble pyramidal neurons, which send excitatory signals. (Her group, like others, is now teasing out how different combinations of transcription factors prompt astrocytes to become different types of neurons.) The researchers also found that newly reprogrammed neurons express different markers and send out different projections depending on which layer of the cortex they are in, just as native neurons do.That’s “very surprising,” says Chun-Li Zhang, a neuroscientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. He is exploring a different reprogramming process, which turns astrocytes into primitive neural progenitor cells that then become neurons more gradually. Both approaches will have to overcome skepticism, he says. Many researchers don’t expect neural newcomers, introduced abruptly into the adult brain, to mature and function normally.”To really convince people,” he says, “we need to be really careful” to document the steps in the transformation of these cells—and to prove that they begin as astrocytes and finish as mature neurons.Researchers have also begun to look for indications that the approach helps animals heal. In a study posted in April on the preprint server bioRxiv, Chen’s group reported that reprogrammed cells improved a mouse’s ability to walk and use its front limbs after a stroke. At the meeting, he hinted that the same approach had restored neural tissue in the brains of stroke-injured monkeys; experiments to gauge their recoveries are ongoing at a collaborator’s facility in China, he says.Chen has founded a company to develop therapies with astrocyte reprogramming, including a cocktail of small molecules that could reprogram cells without brain surgery or the use of a virus. “I believe this is the future,” he told the audience at his conference presentation. “It’s the next frontier in regenerative medicine.”Stem cell biologist Cindi Morshead of the University of Toronto (U of T) in Canada is more circumspect. Scientists don’t fully understand the role of astrocytes in the brain after an injury, she says, but “they’re there for a purpose.” As her group prepared to test the strategy, she expected it to make injured animals worse.She’s more optimistic now. At the conference, her U of T collaborator Maryam Faiz revealed that mice injected with NeuroD1 a week after a stroke recovered motor function more quickly than untreated mice, some of which were permanently disabled. By 2 months after the treatment, mice performed about as well as healthy controls on walking tests. Fully 20% of their neurons were reprogrammed cells.The results in stroke are among the first glimmers of benefit. Last year, Swedish researchers also reported that they had restored some motor function in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease by reprogramming astrocytes into dopamine-producing neurons.Morshead’s results have encouraged her to continue experimenting. She now wants to wait longer after a stroke to inject her mice. Once stroke disability becomes chronic in humans, “we have nothing for them,” she says. If long-disabled mice benefit from their new neurons, she says, “now, that would be the coolest thing.” SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA—If a diseased or injured brain has lost neurons, why not ask other cells to change jobs and pick up the slack? Several research teams have taken a first step by “reprogramming” abundant nonneuronal cells called astrocytes into neurons in the brains of living mice.”Everybody is astonished, at the moment, that it works,” says Nicola Mattugini, a neurobiologist at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany, who presented the results of one such experiment here at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience last week.Now, labs are turning to the next questions: Do these neurons function like the lost ones, and does creating neurons at the expense of astrocytes do brain-damaged animals any good? Many researchers remain skeptical on both counts. But Mattugini’s team, led by neuroscientist Magdalena Götz, and two other groups presented evidence at the meeting that reprogrammed astrocytes do, at least in some respects, impersonate the neurons they’re meant to replace. The two other groups also shared evidence that reprogrammed astrocytes help mice recover movement lost after a stroke. ZHENG WU/GONG CHEN’S LAB Reprogrammed cells could tackle brain damage Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Kelly ServickNov. 14, 2018 , 12:40 PMlast_img read more

Family Disputes Cops Saying Black Man Shot Himself

first_img Black Lives Matter , Darren Williams , Philadelphia Police Reparations presidential candidates Family identifies man in custody shot & killed outside Linwood District court in Lower Chichester Township in Delaware County as 34-year-old Darren Williams, a husband & father from Chester@CBSPhilly pic.twitter.com/iDnaXupw9a— Chantee Lans CBS Philadelphia (@ChanteeLans) June 28, 2019NAACP Statewide President Richard Smith expressed his doubt at the time of the shooting.“The cops always say they grabbed the gun or they try to get away or they have it or this and that, and when the story really comes out it’s different,” Smith said. Williams’ cousin called into “The Clay Cane Show” on SiriusXM Urban View channel 126 on Friday to help the story get more media attention.“They’re [police] trying to bury the story,” Linda Williams told Cane. “It’s horrible… they tased him, they beat him the night before.”She denied accusations that her cousin grabbed the officer’s gun.“That’s a lie. They said that he shot himself in the stomach,” Linda Williams said. “That’s one of the bullets that came from the back that came out of his stomach.”Listen to the clip below:CBS reported there was surveillance video of the altercation and there have been calls for that video to be released, which had not immediately happened.SEE ALSO:WTH? ‘Black Panther’ Writer Roxane Gay Was Not Invited To The Movie PremiereWhite Woman Accused Of Pretending To Be A Doctor In Africa Is Sued After ‘100 Babies’ DieEverything To Know About The Phoenix Police Department’s Culture Of Racism And Corruption Where All The Presidential Candidates Stand On Reparations, In Their Own Words Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family Sadly, there are so many shootings of unarmed Black men that a lot of them fly under the media’s radar. The death of Darren Williams from Chester, Pennsylvania, which is right outside of Philadelphia, may not be a readily recognizable police shooting, but that could be because cops are saying he shot himself.See Also: This Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem GrievanceAccording to CBS, Williams, 34, was shot around 10:40 a.m. by police on June 28. The cops claimed he grabbed an officer’s gun and shot himself in a courthouse parking lot. Delaware County District Attorney Katayoun “Kat” Copeland said the incident happened after Williams was arraigned. Following the hearing, according to Copeland, a local police officer and constable returned to the cell to get Williams, who allegedly shoved the door open and pushed past them.center_img Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist More By NewsOne Staff AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMore6Share to EmailEmailEmail The police claim Williams was at court because he was arrested the night before for DUI and driving recklessly at a high rate of speed. CBS also reported that “The DA added that Williams stole his girlfriend’s vehicle and threatened to kill her.”One eyewitness said Williams was restrained when he was shot.“The officers, when they ran up to him, the white officer was closed-fist punching the Black guy,” Amanda Norton said. “They finally restrained him to the ground, tased him twice with the stun gun. They had him on his stomach side and they said that the gentleman tried to reach for the gun. I saw the whole thing. How could he reach for the gun when he’s restrained and he can’t move? He did not try to reach for the gun and the other sheriff shot him twice in the back. It’s wrong, black lives matter and what happened right now with these cops was uncalled for.”Copeland denied the eyewitness account. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’last_img read more

Traffic may be making your allergies worse

first_img By Priyanka RunwalDec. 7, 2018 , 3:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Andreas Lemke Traffic may be making your allergies worse Ragweed, the bane of summer and autumn allergy sufferers, spreads vigorously with help from a surprising source: our cars and trucks. A new study finds chaotic wakes of air currents from heavy traffic can disperse ragweed seeds tens of meters from their starting point—a huge boost from the usual 1-meter travel radius of seeds from their parent plants.The researchers set up a field experiment to determine how far ragweed seeds traveled on a busy road with fast cars, versus less busy roads. In each trial, they placed 100 seeds painted in fluorescent color along the edge of roads, where seeds would normally drop, and let moving vehicles decide their fate. They then returned with ultraviolet torchlights to mark the new positions of seeds.Within 48 hours, the seeds had settled into new spots. Most remained close to the starting location. But air currents from heavy traffic propelled some seeds tens of meters away, with the most distant traveling 71 meters—about two-thirds the length of a U.S. football field. Even on roads with less traffic, seeds still scattered up to 40 meters. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Then the researchers mapped roadside ragweed plants for two consecutive years to understand how much ragweed populations grew in the direction of traffic movement. In the second year, the team recorded twice as many seedlings flourishing in the direction of traffic movement versus the opposite direction, where the influence of cars was almost nil.The study, which will be published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, is the first to link spread of an invasive species to traffic patterns. Its results suggest bad allergy seasons could be tamped down by requiring municipalities to closely mow roadside plants. But the right time to mow would be shortly before seeds are ripe—otherwise, mowers would spray them even farther afield. Emaillast_img read more

HHS Class of 67 reunion set for September 2930

first_imgHHS Class of ’67 reunion set for September 29-30 September 6, 2017 Members of the Class of 1967 welcome fellow Holbrook High School classmates to their 50th year reunion. The celebration begins with a tailgate party at 5 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 29, prior to the RoadrunnerSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

Census could mean more funding for Navajo County

first_img By L. Parsons         Luis Camacho from the United States Census Bureau addressed the Winslow City Council last week. His presentation was geared toward raising awareness of the importance of taking part in the census.Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Census could mean more funding for Navajo County June 6, 2019last_img

Mumbai At centuryold Crawford market 130 shops restored 265 others waiting in

first_img P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Located opposite to the Mumbai Police Headquarters and a short distance from Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus, it is one of the oldest markets in the city – established in 1869 – and was named after Arthur Crawford, the first municipal commissioner of the city. Rechristened Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market later, it is a grade-I heritage structure and attracts a lot of national and international tourists.“It caters to a mix of locals and tourists and is a great place to pick up things at reasonable rates,” Mukesh Gupta, a regular customer, said. The market is known for selling fruits, dry fruits, handicrafts, imported food items and chocolates, and even boasts of century-old shops.Kayyum Siddiqui, 59, owner of a handicraft store which was started by his father in 1930, said: “I remember coming to the market with my father and helping him in the shop when I was 10 years old. Every day I see customers, who I have been meeting for almost half a century now. My usual customer base consists of retailers, who buy the special baskets in bulk.” Top News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Advertising Advertising Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Written by Siddhant Mallik | Mumbai | Updated: July 16, 2019 4:47:29 am Several shopkeepers said that the mushrooming of shops in the area have hit the traditional businesses. “The market remains the same, but the number of shops has increased in the past few years which has punctured our revenue and increased the competition by a greater margin,” Lala P Yadav, 63, owner of a dry fruits shop, said.While the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has undertaken restoration works in phases – restoring a total of 130 shops in the first phase last year – work on the remaining 265 shops that commenced in December 2017, is on, officials from the civic body’s market department said. Mumbai: At century-old Crawford market, 130 shops restored, 265 others waiting in line Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market, popularly known as Crawford market, continues to be a favourite. (Express Photo)Standing in the heart of South Mumbai for 150 years, Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market, popularly known as Crawford market, continues to be a favourite among city’s shoppers, especially those looking for bulk purchases. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

EZH2 mutations can be used as marker for diagnosing different types of

first_img Source:https://actu.epfl.ch/news/cancer-a-mutation-that-breaks-gene-interplay-in-3d/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 29 2019Inside the cell, DNA is tightly wrapped around proteins and packed in a complex, 3D structure that we call “chromatin”. Chromatin not only protects our genetic material from damage, but also organizes the entire genome by regulating the expression of genes in three dimensions, unwinding them to be presented to the cell’s gene-expression machinery and then winding them back in.Inside the 3D chromatin structure there are certain regions called “topologically associating domains” or TADs. These contain DNA sequences (thousands to millions of DNA bases) that physically interact with each other, suggesting that the genes in these domains may be working together. Discovered in 2012, the functions of TADs are not yet fully understood, but it is known that disrupting TADs disrupts gene regulation, and this can be a mechanism that cancer cells use to alter gene expression.Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationNow, scientists led by Elisa Oricchio at EPFL, in collaboration with Giovanni Ciriello at UNIL, have discovered that a mutation of a particular gene leads to modifying interactions within TADs. The gene is called EZH2 and is normally involved in the repression of gene transcription – the first step in gene expression. In fact, EZH2 mutations play key roles in the initiation of tumors and can be used as marker for diagnosing several different types of cancers.The scientists studied what is known as a gain-of-function mutation of EZH2. These types of mutations exacerbate the gene’s function and help tumor cells to grow. Here, the researchers found that EZH2 does not act randomly across the genome but rather preferentially within specific TADs.Mutated EZH2 shuts down entire domains, turning off genes that normally suppress tumors. In their study, the loss of multiple genes synergistically accelerated the development of the tumors. And when the researchers inhibited mutated EZH2 with a drug, all the functions were restored.The study is the first to show that mutated EZH2 affects not individual genes but entire chromatin domains, changing the interactions and expression of tumor-suppressive genes contained in those domains.”The study highlights the importance of considering the 3D organization of the genome in the nucleus to better understand how mutations in cancer cells exploit this organization to support tumor growth,” says Elisa Oricchio. “Pharmacological inhibitors that block EZH2 oncogenic activity are currently in clinical trials, and this study provides further insight on their therapeutic potential.”last_img read more

Role of immunological imprinting in elicitation of new antibodies

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 21 2019We are repeatedly exposed to the influenza virus via infections, vaccinations and our communal environments. The annual flu shot is believed to be the best line of defense, and doctors recommend vaccinations every year because the flu virus is in a constant state of adaptation and mutation, rendering older vaccines obsolete.The conventional wisdom guiding our long-established annual flu shot comes from an understanding that once a person is newly vaccinated, the immune system is reset and all new antibodies are directed to the new flu strain.However, new research from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin published in a recent issue of the journal Cell Host & Microbe highlights the role played by immunological imprinting — or how the immune system fights the flu after previous exposure to the virus via infections or vaccinations — in the elicitation of new antibodies.”After being vaccinated with a new strain of flu, our immune systems appear to be expanding and boosting antibodies generated by previous exposures to earlier flu viruses, whether by infection or vaccination,” said George Georgiou, a professor of biomedical and chemical engineering and molecular biosciences, a leader in the field of therapeutics and immune responses and co-author of the study.The researchers examined the composition and dynamics of an individual donor’s antibody repertoire over a five-year period during which the donor had been infected or vaccinated with influenza multiple times. The study suggests our immune systems are “imprinted” by antibodies that had been elicited in response to influenza strains encountered previously in life.”Each vaccination still elicits new antibodies that are highly specific to the new strains, but these new antibodies decay over time, returning to the antibody repertoire that already existed before the vaccination,” said Jiwon Lee, a postdoctoral fellow in Georgiou’s Laboratory of Protein Therapeutics and Applied Immunology who led the study.Related StoriesAntibiotics can wipe out early flu resistance, study findsComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USGeorgia State researcher wins $3.26 million federal grant to develop universal flu vaccineThe researchers found that the antibody repertoires remained highly static throughout. More than 70 percent of the antibody molecules found in the donor’s bloodstream remained the same over five years. More than two-thirds of these persistent antibodies targeted invariant parts of the virus — the elements that do not change from one year to the next.These persistent antibodies continue to be produced by the immune system for years and can affect our ability to generate novel antibodies that recognize unique molecular features of a new seasonal strain.”Currently, there is a very large scientific effort underway to design flu vaccine candidates that focus the immune system to produce antibodies targeting the invariant sites of vulnerability of the influenza virus,” Lee said.Vaccines that can imprint one with highly potent antibodies and, therefore, combat a broad range of influenza strains, could reduce or even eliminate the need for annual vaccinations.”Now that we have delineated the role of antibody imprinting in adults, the next step is to analyze the immune response to influenza early in life in order to understand how this phenomenon of antibody imprinting arises in the first place, perhaps even in infancy,” Lee said.Influenza is still one of the world’s most widespread viruses and is extremely difficult to contain. Globally, the influenza virus infects more than 1 billion people and results in approximately half a million deaths annually. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is investing heavily in the development of a universal flu vaccine that could provide long-term protection against multiple subtypes of flu. Such a vaccine could eliminate the need for the annual flu shot entirely.Until such a universal flu vaccine is successfully developed, the annual flu shot is unquestionably still the best way to prevent infection.Source: https://news.utexas.edu/2019/03/19/antibodies-from-earlier-exposures-affect-response-to-new-flu-strains/last_img read more