Grateful for free CPR training in Princetown

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion A Princetown resident and emergency medical physician, Dr. Greer Pomeroy, wanted to provide CPR training at no cost to her neighbors and fellow residents. She knows how important this training can be.When she contacted Mohawk Ambulance to get a price for such a project, Mohawk said that they would provide the training, the equipment, and the course material at no charge.You see, Dr. Pomeroy has trained so many paramedics over the years, Jeff Williams and others at Mohawk wanted to “pay it forward” as a thank you to Dr. Pomeroy. Jeff said that Doc Pomeroy has made an enormous difference by taking a tough stand on paramedics and making sure they knew their stuff before treating people. I know this to be true personally, as Dr. Pomeroy was one of my instructors when I trained to become a paramedic.Out of such great respect for a former teacher, Jeff wanted to honor her by providing her community with free CPR classes. Wow. We don’t see much of that great attitude today — private industry and private citizens working together for the absolute good of the community, neither with any selfish motivation. Kudos.Lots of people in our small country town learned CPR, the Heimlich maneuver, and how to operate an automatic external defibrillator (AEG). They were able to do it at zero cost to themselves.Sometimes Princetown is referred to as the “Mayberry of Schenectady County.” I actually like that comparison. Where else does stuff like this happen?Our special thanks to Mohawk Ambulance and the instructors: Jeff Williams, Ed Marchand, Tyler Freemantle, Christina Marilla, Emily Peters, Cole Mathews and Bob Panarese.My wife and I attended one of the three days of training provided by Mohawk. The classes were wonderful, and I have been getting lots of very positive feedback from residents. Thanks again to all.James PavoldiPrincetownThe writer is a town councilman.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Local movie theater operators react to green lightSchenectady County warns of possible COVID-19 exposure at Schenectady restaurant, Rotterdam barlast_img read more

Cuomo, Democrats taking away our rights

first_imgGov. Andrew Cuomo is back on the gun issue, on those who abuse their spouses or children.They would not be allowed to own certain firearms, which is another unconstitutional law with no guidelines of what defines an abusive person. An argument or difference of opinion might be considered abuse.As it stands right now, all the gun laws are in violation of the Second Amendment and the Commerce Act. The governor already killed our competition sport- and hunting with the Safe Act, which has done nothing to curb the shootings in the tri-city areas. Gov. Cuomo is trying to make the law-abiding citizens and sportsmen defenseless. We can’t buy pepper spray, stun guns or ammo to protect our property and family, which is in direction violations of the Supreme Court.I believe Gov. Cuomo and his New York City cronies should be held accountable for all the homicides in the state. They should be held accountable for the terror groups and bombings due to his sanctuary city, along with Mayor DeBlasio, Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand, and Rep. Tonko. In our state government, all the corrupt representatives come from New York City and are Democrats. Even our courts are about money,  not laws. Remember, all the accusations without proof to substantiate a claim are bogus. You’re innocent until proven guilty. I was surprised at Alabama for the way they voted against a man who fought to keep the 10 Commandments in the Supreme Court of Alabama in order to believe the accusations without proof. After 34 years, these ladies came forward to assassinate his character. I would sue every one of them for slander. I wonder how much they were paid. The Democratic Party made politics dirty and costly to the taxpayers. Do you really want to pay for bogus investigations and lies? I don’t.Claude Rizzicone Jr.SchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady’s Lucas Rodriguez forging his own path in dance, theater, musicSchenectady NAACP calls for school layoff freeze, reinstatement of positionsEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Thanks to all great teachers in Schenectady schools

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionCongratulations and kudos to Kathleen Wylie, who was chosen “teacher of the year” in Schenectady. To be recognized in your chosen field is a wonderful thing.As to the superintendent’s comment as quoted in the article, “I wish I had a thousand just like her.” My response to that is, you do. Here’s to all Schenectady teachers, the unsung heroes and heroines of past and future generations. Thank you for your service.Joan MackNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

Guest Column: Bill will harm disabled more than help

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionFor The Daily GazetteThe Eastern New York Developmental Disabilities Advocates (ENYDDA), is an independent all-volunteer organization of hundreds of parents and families of developmentally disabled individuals in the greater Capital Region and eastern upstate New York.Our mission is to educate and inform policy makers, the media and the public on issues impacting our disabled children and loved ones. On May 6 the Sunday Gazette published an editorial supporting, among other things, the enactment by the state Legislature of a bill (S.4746B/A.6830A).The bill  would require that every actual or alleged incident of abuse or neglect of a person with a disability or special needs in the care of a facility or service provider  be reported to a 911 operator and the county district attorney’s office.It would also raise the penalty for the failure of any employee to make such reports from a misdemeanor to a Class E felony and would also subject both employees and volunteers to civil action. To make every one of them the subject of an emergency response call and a criminal investigation would be a gross overreaction.It would waste the time and energy of our already overtaxed caregiver staff, needlessly disturb and inconvenience the disabled individuals themselves, and it would be a dangerous waste of critical emergency and law enforcement resourcesSecond, this bill discourages people from working in the field of caring for the disabled, at a time when thousands of capable, compassionate and desperately needed workers are already leaving the profession due to the combination of challenging work, low wages and the constant concern that the failure to make reports of every minor event could result in suspension, investigation, dismissal and, now, possible felony charges.This bill would drive the existing workforce crisis to become even more dire. Lastly, the broad additional exception in the bill to the current privacy protections afforded to the disabled on a wide range of medical, psychological, therapeutic and other personal information will often be an unnecessary, invasive, and discriminatory violation of their privacy. Patrick J. Curran and Brad Pivar are members of the Steering Committee, Eastern NY Developmental Disability Advocates.  Lastly, it would expand the current exceptions to the confidentiality protections for the private records of disabled persons in such cases to include mandatory access by local police and the District Attorney.As parents and families of the disabled we commend the motivation and share the objectives behind both the legislation and The Gazette’s editorial support, and are grateful for the focus on an issue so close to our hearts.However, this bill would have little or no impact on the current reporting or prevention of abuse and neglect and is virtually certain to create far more harm to those that it is trying to protect than it will ever prevent. First, the bill is grossly over broad in requiring all reportable incidents, as defined in law, to be reported to 911 and law enforcement officials.The law currently provides that such incidents that occur in the care of defined facility or service provider be investigated by the provider, reported to the Justice Center for investigation, and forwarded to law enforcement where appropriate.Moreover, current regulation already provides, and workers are trained, that law enforcement be contacted immediately any time a crime may have been committed against a disabled individual by a custodian or when an emergency response is required.  We as parents know that the vast majority of these incidents are relatively minor, routine, accidental or simply false.center_img More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Syked up

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Industrial: City of industry

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RICS warns on leases malaise

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Clicking into place

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A global pandemic could cost $1 Trillion

first_imgFor now, central bankers and governments continue to bet that the coronavirus will not damage the world economy by much, and perhaps allow it to enjoy a rapid rebound once the illness fades. But that confidence is being tested.While the International Monetary Fund currently reckons the virus will only force it to knock 0.1 percentage point off its 3.3 percent global growth forecast for 2020, IMF Chief Economist Gita Gopinath said in a Yahoo Finance interview that a pandemic declaration would risk “really downside, dire scenarios.”The head of the World Health Organization called the new cases “deeply concerning,” but said the outbreak isn’t yet a pandemic.Still, the protracted shutdown of Chinese factories that were supposed to be back online and the spread of the virus to South Korea, Iran and Italy’s northern industrial heartland raise the specter of much greater death and disruption. The virus risks tipping Italy into a recession that could hurt the rest of Europe too. The ghastly prospect that the coronavirus outbreak could become the first truly disruptive pandemic of the globalization era is renewing doubts over the stability of the world economy.With the death toll approaching 3,000, over 80,000 cases officially recorded and an outbreak in Italy now shutting down the richest chunk of its economy, some economists are beginning to war game what an untethered outbreak could mean for global growth.Those at Oxford Economics reckon an international health crisis could be enough to wipe more than $1 trillion from global gross domestic product. That would be the economic price tag for a spike in workplace absenteeism, lower productivity, sliding travel, disrupted supply chains and reduced trade and investment.Investors are already nervous, with US stock benchmarks slumping more than 3 percent on Monday and the S&P 500 Index dropping the most since February 2018. South Korea’s economy is being buffered, with consumer confidence plunging the most in five years.UBS Group AG Chairman Axel Weber is already far more pessimistic than the IMF and warned global growth will experience a massive drop from 3.5 percent to 0.5 percent and China will shrink in the first quarter.“The much larger downside risk is that this continues to be a problem,” the former Bundesbank president told Bloomberg Television in Riyadh, where Group of 20 finance chiefs hinted at collective worries at the dangers of the virus.How to assess the risk is complicated by doubt over how far the coronavirus will travel.In an analysis that predates the current outbreak, the World Bank reckons a destructive pandemic could result in millions of deaths, and points to how even conservative estimates suggest such an experience might destroy as much as 1 percent of global GDP. A disastrous health crisis akin to the 1918 Spanish flu, which may have killed as many as 50 million people, could cost 5 percent of global GDP, the Washington-based lender said in a 2015 report.A March 2016 paper co-authored by former US Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers likened the annual financial impact of a pandemic flu to the long-term yearly cost of global warming. It calculated that if pandemic deaths were to exceed 700,000 per year, the combined cost to the world economy of premature lives lost and illness, along with lost income, would total 0.7 percent of global income.Oxford Economics’s tally of the impact from a global pandemic stemming from the current outbreak suggests a cost of $1.1 trillion to global GDP, with both the US and euro zone economies suffering recessions in the first half of 2020. It describes such a scenario as a “short but very sharp shock on the world economy.”Aside from containment of the disease, one mitigating factor — and a major unknown for economists modeling the outcome — will be the actions of central banks and governments to cushion the effects. Yet for Drew Matus, chief market strategist at MetLife Investment Management, monetary policy alone would probably be insufficient.“My guess would be you actually can’t solve it with interest rates,” he told Bloomberg Television. “People are worried about their families, worried about their health — 25 basis points doesn’t do it, in terms of encouraging people to go out there and spend.”Topics :last_img read more

PREMIUMJakarta councilors, residents demand Anies pull the plug on Formula E

first_imgFollowing the discovery of the first confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the country, Jakarta councilors have pressured the administration to cancel the Formula E race, which is slated to be held for the first time in June.Mujiyono, the Jakarta Legislative Council’s head of Commission A overseeing administrative affairs, said the city would suffer losses due to low ticket sales since many countries had issued travel warnings to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.  “It will be a loss because some countries will not send athletes to come to Indonesia due to the coronavirus. Foreign tourists, too, will think twice about coming to watch the race because of the outbreak,” the Democratic Party politician told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.He suggested that city-owned developer PT Jakarta Propertindo (Jakpro), the event organizer, ne… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social account Facebook Forgot Password ? Linkedin Google Topics : Formula-E Jakarta-2020-Formula-E Monas FIA-Formula-E FEO Montreal anies-baswedanlast_img read more