Chrissie Hynde to Join PETA Protest Before Concert

first_imgBefore her show at The Depot in Salt Lake City later tonight (Monday), rocker Chrissie Hynde will offer up some holiday food for thought outside a downtown grocery store.Accompanied by a PETA member dressed as a giant turkey and standing under a banner that proclaims, “Thanksgiving Is Murder on Turkeys,” the Pretenders lead singer will encourage shoppers to give birds a break this holiday season.When: Monday, November 24, 2:30 p.m.Where: Harmons Grocery, 135 E. 100 South (near the intersection with State Street), Salt Lake City“Gathering around an animal corpse is no way to celebrate life and family,” Hynde says. “From Tofurky and Field Roast to the recipes on PETA’s website, it’s easier than ever to enjoy a vegan Thanksgiving meal that gives everyone — including turkeys — something to be thankful for.”Approximately 300 million turkeys are killed in the U.S. every year — 45 million for Thanksgiving dinners alone. Most turkeys are crammed into filthy warehouses and are drugged and bred to grow such unnaturally large upper bodies that their legs often become crippled under the weight. At slaughterhouses, turkeys are electrocuted and many are still conscious when their throats are slit and they’re plunged into scalding-hot defeathering tanks.PETA — whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to eat” — offers an array of vegan holiday recipes on its website.Source:PETAlast_img read more

Khloe Kardashian Helps Launch Live Chin Up Campaign

first_imgEarlier this month, Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, kicked off their Live Chin Up campaign at an exclusive event at the Frank Gehry-designed IAC Building in New York City, hosted by television personality and New York Times best-selling author Khloe Kardashian.The Live Chin Up campaign is designed to help encourage people to not let the things that bother them get in their way.At the event, Kardashian moderated a distinguished panel of experts which included a dermatologist who discussed submental fullness and treatment options, including KYBELLA (deoxycholic acid) injection 10mg/mL. Additionally, a patient joined the panel to discuss her experience living with submental fullness.“We are very pleased that Khloé was able to serve as the host of our event and discuss how she lives chin up,” said Philippe Schaison, EVP and President Allergan Medical. “As someone who lives life in the public eye, Khloé embodies what it means to live chin up by refusing to let negativity stand in her way. We feel she is the perfect person to kick off this inspiring campaign.”Anyone interested in learning more about this campaign or how they can live chin up can visit www.livechinup.com.last_img read more

Creative heavyweight Jay Baruchel to deliver closing keynote at the CMPAs Prime

first_imgAdvertisement ABOUT PRIME TIME IN OTTAWAThe CMPA’s Prime Time in Ottawa conference is a national networking event for some 600 of Canada’s most prominent business leaders from the television, interactive media, feature film, broadcasting and telecommunications industries.  primetimeinottawa.caABOUT THE CANADIAN MEDIA PRODUCERS ASSOCIATIONThe Canadian Media Producers Association (CMPA) is the country’s leading member-based advocacy organization for independent producers, representing hundreds of companies engaged in the development and distribution of English-language content made for television, cinema and digital media channels. The CMPA works to promote the continued success of the Canadian production sector and ensure a future for diverse content made by Canadians for both domestic and international audiences.  cmpa.ca Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img OTTAWA – The Canadian Media Producers Association (CMPA) is pleased to announce creative heavyweight Jay Baruchel will wrap up the 2018 edition of Prime Time in Ottawa as the closing keynote speaker. A noted actor, producer, writer and director, Baruchel’s recent credits include Goon: Last of the Enforcers, Man Seeking Woman, This Is the End, Tropic Thunder and the How to Train Your Dragon franchise among numerous others.Prime Time in Ottawa brings together an esteemed line-up of business executives, innovators and thought leaders from across the film, TV and digital industries for in-depth discussions that contribute to the global conversation about the changing environment for leading-edge content. The conference runs January 31 to February 2, 2018 at The Westin Ottawa.“Jay Baruchel represents the very best of what it means to be a Canadian creative,” said Reynolds Mastin, President and CEO of the CMPA. “His innovative and modern view of the Canadian screen-based production sector is exactly the injection of passion and determination that will strengthen our place domestically and in the global landscape. We are thrilled that Jay will be joining us for what is sure to be an exciting, future-gazing discussion.” Prime Time’s speaker roster includes media leaders, co-production experts, innovators in digital platforms and storytelling, international marketplace trailblazers, and specialists of brand-funded entertainment. For a complete list of speakers announced thus far, please visit primetimeinottawa.ca. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Hudsons Bays striped carpet rolls out at the 43rd Toronto International Film

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook TORONTO – As the city prepares for the arrival of Hollywood’s elite, Hudson’s Bay today announced its return as an Official Fashion Retailer and Red Carpet Sponsor for the 43rd Toronto International Film Festival® (TIFF). From Thur., Sept. 6 to Sun., Sept. 16, the industry’s biggest stars will once again grace the iconic striped carpet at Roy Thomson Hall. The Canadian company also expands its festival presence with TIFF LIVE from the Red Carpet presented by Hudson’s Bay.“The Toronto International Film Festival is one of the most significant events this city experiences and we are so thrilled to be a part of it,” said Alison Coville, President, Hudson’s Bay. “As a Canadian company, we are proud to support another iconic Canadian establishment – one that brings the city together to see the best in film, fashion, and culture. The TIFF LIVE from the Red Carpet presented by Hudson’s Bay will be a great way for fans to not only see their favourite stars, but also hear from them.” Watch the #starsonstripesHere for the dazzling fashion? The Festival’s red carpets don’t disappoint when it comes to best dressed guests. Don’t miss the daily “Stars on Stripes” press alerts to see what the stars are wearing as they walk the Hudson’s Bay iconic striped carpet at Roy Thomson Hall.“Red carpet fashion is incredible to watch, and TIFF is no exception,” said Tyler Franch, Fashion Director, Hudson’s Bay.“On the carpet this September, I think tailored pant suits and layered lace will lead the way. We’ll also see dramatic back v-cuts and chic silhouettes emphasized. At Hudson’s Bay, we’re excited about silver, leopard print, and statement earrings, which all work well for a red carpet moment or TIFF after-party.”TIFF LIVE from the Red Carpet presented by Hudson’s BayHudson’s Bay will bring its iconic stripes to the podium by joining TIFF’s live broadcast of the red carpet arrivals at Roy Thomson Hall. From Sept. 6-9, tune into TIFF’s social channels to watch anchor host, Amanda Brugel, and guest hosts, Aisha Brown, Anthony Oliveira, and Jordan Sowunmi, meet with the cast and talk film and red carpet fashion. Watch live here.Amanda Brugel is a notable Canadian actor best known for her roles in the Emmy Award-winning series The Handmaid’s Tale, Canadian Screen Award-winning sitcom Kim’s Convenience, comedy film Sex After Kids, for which she won an ACTRA Award for Best Female Performance, and her role in the Oscar Award-winning Room.Anthony Oliviera is a writer, pop culture critic, and PhD living in Toronto. He can be found on Twitter at @meakoopa, where he tweets (incessantly) about the arts, politics, and LGBT culture, or on his podcast, The Devil’s Party, as he reads through Milton’s Paradise Lost and its demonic twists and turns.Jordan Sowunmi is a Toronto-based writer, DJ, comedian, and co-founder of the Boosie Fade Film Club. He has written for publications like The FADER, VICE, Complex, and Title Magazine. As a comedian, he has opened for comics like Eric Andre and Jen Kirkman. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Western University in English and Political Science.Aisha Brown is a stand-up comedian who has appeared at Just for Laughs, JFL42, the Guelph Comedy Festival, Sketchfest, and Toronto’s Field Trip festival. She also performs with “Runnin’ at The Mouth”, a hip-hop comedy collective.Colette and What They Had Cast DinnerHudson’s Bay joins The Hollywood Reporter, Bleecker Street and Elevation Pictures in hosting a cast dinner for two of the Festival’s much-anticipated films, Colette and What They Had. Cast members expected to attend include Keira Knightley, Dominic West, Hilary Swank, Michael Shannon, Blythe Danner, and Robert Forster, who will be treated to a seated dinner and décor featuring Hudson’s Bay signature stripes, offering a truly ‘Canadiana’ vibe.Interviews are available upon request with Alison Coville, President, Hudson’s Bay, or Tyler Franch, Fashion Director, Hudson’s Bay.Twitter: @HudsonsBayInstagram: @HudsonsBayFacebook: @HudsonsBaySnapchat: hudsonsbayHashtag: #starsonstripesABOUT HUDSON’S BAYHBC, incorporated in 1670, is North America’s oldest company. Hudson’s Bay has grown to become Canada’s most prominent department store, today operating 89 full-line locations and thebay.com. For the first time since the banner’s inception, Hudson’s Bay opened outside of Canada with 10 new stores in the Netherlands in 2017, and an online shopping destination at hudsonsbay.nl. Hudson’s Bay has established a reputation for quality, service, and style by offering well-edited assortments of exclusive and popular fashion, beauty, home, and accessory designers and brands, as well as exclusive food concepts.  It is part of the HBC brand portfolio. The signature stripes are a registered trademark of Hudson’s Bay Company.last_img read more

Federal budget day in Canada

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt was federal budget day in Canada.A time when the federal government lays out its priorities and looks to the future.It’s also a time when Aboriginal People find out whether or not their issues and concerns will be addressed.last_img

Ontario First Nation in battle with feds over use of funds

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Serpent River First Nation in Ontario has opened a new water treatment plant.It’s good news for the community of about 600.But as APTN’s Delaney Windigo reports the community was also looking for fire protection and then Aboriginal Affairs got involved.last_img

Red Cross funds study into how Fort McMurray wildfire affected First Nation

first_imgThe Canadian PressMelanie Dene still remembers the harrowing ordeal of driving through fiery hell during the evacuation of Fort McMurray six months ago with her two young daughters.The chaos of traffic-choked roads, the thick smoke from the massive northern Alberta wildfire and flames so hot that her car stalled _ its engine on fire _ are all still fresh in her mind.“It was scary and I was like ‘Oh my God,” she said. “I just started praying and telling my girls that it was going to be OK.“There was just fire dropping everywhere. I just can’t get that image out of my head. My first thought was we are going to die.”Dene and her family lost their home and all of their belongings in the fire but made it out safely. They now live in Edmonton.She and others are now the subject of a research study into how the wildfire affected First Nation and Metis communities in and around the Fort McMurray region.The Canadian Red Cross is funding research, which involves talking to people whose homes were destroyed in the city, who faced food shortages in outlying communities and those who can no longer hunt, trap or pick berries because of the charred terrain.The study involves five First Nations that make up the Athabasca Tribal Council along with the Wood Buffalo, Willow Lake and Chard Metis communities and other organizations.Maggie Farrington, CEO of the tribal council, said they hope to learn how to help communities recover from the fire and be better prepared for future disasters. The council estimates about 10,000 Indigenous people live in the region, including some who lost homes in some of the hardest hit city neighbourhoods.The $500,000 study is being conducted by a consulting firm and will include asking people to share what happened to them during the fire.“There is a healing element in telling stories,” Farrington said. “At some point their stories will contribute to a larger dialogue to help build a resiliency that we really hope will be the ultimate result of this research.”The report is to be completed in 18 months and its findings are to be shared with governments.Farrington said Indigenous people are determined to bounce back from the wildfire, including eight of her staff who lost homes in the blaze.The tribal council building survived, but the flames scorched the teepee lodge polls the organization uses for ceremonies. Staff simply scraped off the charred areas so they can be used again.Before May 3, Dene always thought of fire as a source of warmth, not as something mean and destructive. She said it took time before she could even look at a campfire, but finally came to terms with her fear.During a birthday celebration for one of her daughters she made a point of looking directly into the flames in a fireplace.“It was really hard for me. I was terrified. But I did it,” she said.“It has been six months and I still feel that we are still experiencing the trauma.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

At DFC in Thunder Bay art club is more than just an

first_imgWillow FiddlerAPTN News Saturday15-year-old Ariana Chikane from North Caribou Lake enjoys the extracurricular activities at Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School (DFC).“I didn’t have supplies back home like I saw an art club here and it looked fun and I joined it,” she said.“That’s how I got into it.”DFC Student Ariana Chikane from North Caribou Lake.The talent that comes from this club is on display all over DFC.It’s also hanging in the city’s airport, and in exhibitions at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery.The art club is an outlet for students like Chikane who are attending high school away from home and family.North Caribou Lake where Ariana is from for instance is a fly in community located 500 km north of Thunder Bay.In fact, many of the 100 students attending DFC come from remote First Nations spread out across northern Ontario.The students have worked with well-known Anishinabe artists like Saul Williams in the past.“It’s like once a week but then I do art every day after school.”This year, they tried something new with local art educator Elizabeth Buset.“Stenciling is a medium that I work with,” said Buset. “I don’t really consider myself a graffiti artist because I don’t do like freehand spray painting but I do do stencil work.”The completed project is a spray painted wall mural.It reflects the different subjects at DFC.“They selected all the images and then from there we designed the stencils, they hand cut them all and then it came up to the actual spray painting of the mural, they chose where it would be positioned on the wall, what colors it would be, the layering, it was all collaborative from start to finish,” said Buset.Ariana and her cousin Robyn did a piece by the late Anishinabe artist Roy Thomas.“I learned about him, found out about him in art class,” said Ariana.Thomas’ wife Louise owns Ahnisnabae Art Gallery in Thunder Bay.The DFC art club presents Louise Thomas with a spray painted version of her late husband’s art. Photo: Willow Fiddler/APTN She said it’s important to support the young artists at DFC.“There’s a lot of wonderful artists that are coming out of this school,” said Thomas. “When you look at these young people, our people, we have just natural talent.”Thomas said she hopes the art club can inspire youth.“We need to have these things to inspire other artists even if you’re not from this school, there’s lots of talent out there,” she said.“I always encourage artists don’t waste your talent, do something with your talent.”For Ariana, it’s all about the fun experience.“I like bringing stuff to life.”wfiddler@aptn.ca@WillowBlasizzolast_img read more

As Disney swallows Fox a new era dawns for Hollywood

first_imgNEW YORK, N.Y. – After years of tremors, the earthquake that had long been predicted finally shook Hollywood.Disney’s deal to purchase most of 21st Century Fox ends the era of the “Big Six” major movie studios, toppling one of the industry’s most famed studios and dramatically redrawing the Hollywood map.Disney’s move — to pay $52.4 billion in stock for Fox assets — has countless reverberations. But by effectively absorbing Fox’s film studio, 20th Century Fox, Disney has rapidly accelerated the industry contraction that many considered inevitable in an era of flat-lining ticket sales and new streaming competitors like Netflix, Amazon and Apple.The Big Six are now the Big Five — and the mightiest of them all has just been supersized.The Disney deal hasn’t just made 20th Century Fox’s 3,200 employees anxious about their future within Disney. It’s sent shockwaves through an industry that has until now bent under the pressures of the new digital landscape, but not broken. Now, Hollywood as an industry is quite literally shrinking.“The strongest will get stronger and the weaker will fall off or merge with other entities,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock. “The future is right now and it’s pretty obvious what’s going on.”Many analysts consider further consolidation simply a matter of time. Before Rupert Murdoch earlier this fall began shopping Fox, most expected the first studio to fall would be either Viacom’s Paramount Pictures (5 per cent of the market) or Sony Pictures (8.8 per cent), both of which have struggled in recent years and replaced their chief executives. Lionsgate and CBS are also frequent sources of speculation.Fox is bigger, though. Founded in 1935 by the merger of Twentieth Century Pictures and Fox Films, 20th Century Fox is the home of “The Sound of Music,” the original “Star Wars” and the highest grossing film of all-time, “Avatar.” The studio has generally ranked either third or fourth in market share. This year, it’s fourth with 12.3 per cent, following the market-leader Disney, Warner Bros. and Universal.Fox isn’t necessarily disappearing. Disney will lease its fabled Los Angeles lot for the next seven years. But 20th Century Fox will be folded into Walt Disney Studios. Its movie-making operations will be reduced and likely restructured.As a studio, Disney is already based on several distinct silos of brands: Disney, Marvel, Pixar and Lucasfilm. Its strength in intellectual properties — especially “Star Wars” and its library of animation classics — has made the studio dominant. In a conference call with investors Thursday, Disney chief executive Robert Iger suggested Fox may function similarly as a label within Disney.“We have not only respected the culture of those organizations but respected and appreciated the talent that came with those acquisitions,” Iger said.Before it sold a ticket for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” Disney already has three of the top six movies of the year: “Beauty and the Beast,” ”Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2″ and “Thor: Ragnarok.” It has used its might to enforce more onerous terms with theatres on films like “The Last Jedi.” Disney is requiring many theatre operators to share a higher percentage — 65 per cent — of ticket sales. The film is expected to come close to grossing $500 million worldwide this weekend.The combination of sensibilities between Disney and Fox, has intrigued others. Though it’s easy to see the planned quartet of “Avatar” movies under a Disney banner (“Avatar” already has a place in Disney theme parks), many of Fox’s franchises, including “X-Men” and “The Kingsman,” are well off-brand for the family-friendly Disney. It hasn’t released an R-rated movie in four years.“Time to uncork that explosive sexual tension between Deadpool and Mickey Mouse,” Ryan Reynolds tweeted after earlier reports of the Disney-Fox deal.Disney, which sold Miramax Pictures in 2005, has lacked other kinds of films, too. Fox’s specialty label, Fox Searchlight, is among the industry’s art-house leaders. Two Searchlight films — “The Shape of Water” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — along with Fox’s “The Post” have made the studio the leading company of this year’s awards season, at least with the Golden Globes and Screen Actors Guild Awards.Iger voiced his support for maintaining those businesses. “We like being in the business of making quality movies,” said Iger. “We fully intend to stay in those businesses.”The deal also, perhaps crucially, gives Disney the extensive Fox library for Disney’s planned streaming service, set to debut in 2019. Disney is now better armed to compete against deep-pocketed digital competitors. Netflix has said it will spend up to $8 billion on original content next year.“It’s really a battle about the future of streaming,” said Peter Labuza, a film historian and researcher at the University of Southern California. “Disney needs all this material outside of its own brand which now is its own Disney product, Lucasfilm, Pixar. But this can fill in a lot of the space in a streaming site that can compete with, essentially, Netflix.”That’s a component of the deal that will strike fear in the hearts of exhibitors. Disney has pursued an almost completely event-movie strategy (it’s releasing only eight movies this year), and it’s expected to cut back Fox’s theatrical slate. That’s reason for concern for already struggling theatre owners. Box office revenues were up just 1 per cent last year, and are expected to slide this year.“They can’t be pleased,” said Bock of exhibitors. “Less product just means less revenue in their minds.”But Disney has also, up until now, been a staunch defender of the traditional theatrical window. For that reason, as well as its reputation for quality, the world’s largest theatre chain, AMC, hasn’t sounded any alarms over the purchase. Last week on CNBC, Adam Aron, AMC chief executive, applauded Disney’s track record. “AMC has made a lot of money partnering with Disney studios,” he said.Whichever direction Disney chooses to go, it will have the sway — with approximately 40 per cent market share — to set the course for the entire industry.Hollywood may have shrunk into not the Big Five, but the Big One.___Film Writer Lindsey Bahr contributed to this report.last_img read more

China wants no progressive elements in any free trade deal with Canada

first_imgOTTAWA – China’s ambassador has firmly rejected a key pillar of the Trudeau government’s trade agenda, branding its attempts to entrench labour standards in a free trade pact as a non-starter for his country.Ambassador Lu Shaye said Tuesday that Canada’s “so-called” progressive trade agenda has no place in the free trade agreement the two countries have been pursuing in fits and starts for several years.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been unable to persuade China’s leaders to formally entrench labour, gender, environment and governance issues in the negotiating framework of the free trade talks.Trudeau spent four days in China in December but left without a formal commitment to moving the free trade talks past the exploratory phase into formal negotiations.Without elaborating, Lu said the two countries have reached “consensus on extensive issues, but (there) still remain some differences on the so-called progressive trade factors.”“For the Chinese side, we have stressed many times … we really want so-called, non-trade-related factors or issues to not be included in the negotiation of an FTA,” Lu said through an interpreter to a small gathering of journalists at the Chinese embassy in Ottawa.China is taking note of how Canada is pursuing the same agenda in the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. But Lu said Canada’s insistence on pushing labour standards in the NAFTA talks with Mexico to raise wages would only lead to the shuttering of Mexican auto plants and lost jobs.“If the Mexico side accepts such kind of standards many of the factories have to close down and their workers have to be laid off,” he said.“So, for the negotiation of the FTA (between Canada and China), it is the national conditions that really matters.”There appears to be little forward momentum towards the start of formal negotiations between Beijing and Ottawa on a free trade pact.Joseph Pickerill, spokesman for International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne, said Tuesday there was “nothing to report right now on trade talks,” but he noted there’s ongoing political engagement. He cited the recent visits to China by Champagne, Finance Minister Bill Morneau and this week’s trade mission of Heritage Minister Melanie Joly and representatives from 60 cultural industries.“This is one of the most complex but also potentially lucrative markets in the world and that requires a smarter, longer-term and more strategic approach to engagement with China,” said Pickerill.“As the minister often says, trade is over decades and this particular relationship, expanding economic engagement will take the time it takes to get it right for Canadians.”Despite the differences, Lu characterized relations between the two countries as warm and said China “definitely” had no deadline for starting formal negotiations. They have already gone through four rounds of exploratory talks.The envoy said starting a free trade negotiation with Canada would send a strong message to the world as it contends with the Trump administration’s “America First” protectionism.“If Canada and China start a negotiation of an FTA, it will send positive signals to the international community, that is: China and Canada all uphold the flag of supporting the free trade and economic globalization.”Lu also debunked any suggestion that Chinese President Xi Jinping was offering the U.S. concessions on Tuesday in their ongoing trade dispute.U.S. President Donald Trump said in a tweet that he was thankful for Xi’s “kind words on tariffs and automobile barriers … also, his enlightenment on intellectual property and technology transfers. We will make great progress together!”In a major economic policy speech, Xi said tariffs would be reduced on imported cars and said China would offer added measures towards intellectual property protection.But Lu said those measures had been previously announced in recent high-profile meetings, including the Communist party’s historic congress last fall where Xi laid the groundwork that led to him to recently being granted indefinite power, making him China’s most powerful leader in a generation.“China has reiterated on many occasions that we sincerely hope to resolve the China-U.S. trade frictions through dialogue and negotiation but at the current position now the U.S. takes an aggressive stance on this issue, I think it is not possible for us to have the negotiations,” said Lu.In the face of Trump’s protectionism, which has now escalated into the biggest trade dispute since the Second World War, Xi has sought to position China as the defender of the world’s rules-based global trading order — a view his envoy to Canada emphasized on Tuesday.“We can see that China has taken active measures to promote the economic globalization, to advance free trade and to uphold the authority of the multilateral trade regime,” Lu said.“These kinds of actions are fully different from that of the U.S. ‘America First’ initiatives and its measures.”last_img read more

CPP Fund posts 116 return thanks partly to last years stock markets

first_imgTORONTO – Canada Pension Plan Investment Board achieved an 11.6 per cent rate of return in fiscal 2018, keeping it on track to provide long-term financial support for the country’s largest retirement fund, according to figures released Thursday.The CPP Fund increased its assets by $39.4 billion over the financial year ended March 31, slightly more than the $37.8 billion increase in fiscal 2017 and much better than the $14.3 billion increase in 2016.At the end of March, the CPP Fund had net assets of $356.1 billion, up from $316.7 billion at the end of fiscal 2017 and $278.9 billion at the end of fiscal 2016, which included nine months in calendar 2015.Investment gains have offset shrinking employer and employee contributions, which fell to $2.7 billion in fiscal 2018 from $4.3 billion in fiscal 2017 and $5.2 billion in fiscal 2016.Canada’s chief actuary estimates the CPP Fund can meet its obligations with an average return of 3.9 per cent over 75 years.The investment portfolio’s 10-year real rate of return, which is comparable to the chief actuary’s benchmark estimate, was 6.2 per cent in fiscal 2018 while the five-year rate of return was 10.4 per cent.While CPPIB chief executive officer Mark Machin declined to predict Thursday how investment returns will turn out this year, he said the portfolio actually anticipates that there will be losing years from time to time.“Hopefully, it doesn’t happen this coming year but statistically that’s going to happen at least one year in 10.”Right now “the world still is in synchronized growth in most markets, so that continues to be supportive,” Machin said.Economic growth hasn’t been hurt by the Federal Reserve’s tightening of the U.S. money supply through higher interest rates and other measures, which were offset by a major drop in U.S. government tax rates.“The fiscal stimulus in the U.S. — while it’s a one-off — will have a benefit this year and next. So it’s gone from hyperstimulative conditions to just stimulative conditions in the U.S.,” Machin said in an interview.Nevertheless, Machin acknowledged that higher interest rates may be negative for some of CPPIB’s asset classes.“For example, real estate and infrastructure types of investments can be quite sensitive to rises in interest rates. As well, bonds can be sensitive to a rise in interest rates,” Machin said.He said CPPIB’s best protection against changing market conditions is its broad diversification among a wide rate of asset classes and geographic markets.last_img read more

Its Camp Day at Tim Hortons

first_imgIt’s Camp Day at Tim Hortons, and that means 100 per cent of the money from coffee sales will go towards helping thousands of kids go camping.The Tim Horton Children’s Foundation has seven camps across Canada and the United States which allow kids from low-income families enjoy the camp experience.Tim Hortons is also hoping people will encourage others to give by using the hashtag #CampDay and by mentioning @TimHortons on Twitter and Instagram.Last year, a record-breaking $13.7-million was raised.last_img read more

Hudsons Bay to spotlight homegrown designers with popup showcase

first_imgTORONTO – In little more than a year and a half, budding menswear label WIL Studios has caught the eye of fashionistas, singer Daniel Caesar and now Hudson’s Bay.The massive retailer says it will showcase the emerging company along with 11 other new and established homegrown talents at a pop-up showcase this September curated by the Toronto-based fashion management firm, The Collections.Rahul Madan of WIL Studios says it’s a dream come true for his young brand, which he formed in early 2017 with university pal Eric Richards. The duo have found early success in securing the support of Caesar, who wore their clothes on tour and in a TV appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” earlier this year.Madan says it’s especially surreal for the 26-year-olds to be selling their clothes at Hudson’s Bay because they each used to work at the retail chain in Toronto.“There are crazy stories of Eric working and me coming around and over the course of the summer designing clothes while he’s working,” says Madan, who met Richards while both studied and played football at Western University in London, Ont.“To think about it in that sense, I have a big smile on my face because I can’t believe that we’re going to stock the store that we used to work at.”Hudson’s Bay president Alison Coville says the three-month project is meant to give a national platform to Canadian designers who otherwise struggle to break through.The pop-up launches Sept. 4 at five locations across the country, including two stores in downtown Toronto, and one each in Montreal, Vancouver and Calgary.All five stores will feature designers Mikhael Kale, Pedram, S.P. Badu, WIL Studios, WRKDEPT, Hilary MacMillan and Sid Neigum.The Vancouver and Toronto Queen Street location will also include Atelier Guarin, Markoo and New York-based Daniel Gregory Natale, and accessories by Biko and Cuchara.Their wares will also be available online at www.thebay.com.While shoppers seem increasingly headed to e-commerce, Coville expects this showcase will entice shoppers back to brick-and-mortar Hudson’s Bay stores.“There’s entertainment value to see what’s new and see what’s exciting,” she says, adding that a strong patriotism will also help encourage shoppers to buy Canadian.“You see the impact that our Olympic wear has when we launch those collections (and) with our Hudson’s Bay company heritage line — every time we put out a new striped product and it hits social media, there’s lots of excitement around it.”Dwayne Kennedy, co-founder and fashion director at The Collections, notes this will be the first wholesale account for many of the labels.“We really want this to be an introduction for a lot of the brands,” says Kennedy.“We want to make it a lot more accessible so our price points range from $40 upwards to $1,200 but we really kept it in the midpoint of that.”The showcase is just the latest in a series of pop-ups at the department store, including one that featured eco-conscious fashion.Madan marvels at how far his label has come since he and Richards began designing T-shirts in their dorm room years ago when he studied kinesiology.Madan graduated from the University of Toronto in 2016, and followed that up with fashion courses at George Brown College in Toronto. He launched the brand in February 2017.He says that now having his T-shirts, outerwear and bags in a major retailer is a big boost.“It gives some validity to the brand, it allows people and other stores to trust your production and it allows you to sit beside other brands that are well-respected and that are already trusted in the marketplace,” says Madan.“This is obviously a major step in where we want to take the brand and where we see ourselves going.”Note to readers: CORRECTS reference to Chinook, Alta. to Calgary in para 8last_img read more

US trade deficit widened to 501 billion in July

first_imgWASHINGTON – The U.S. trade deficit widened for the second straight month in July, reaching the highest level since February, as imports hit an all-time high. The deficit in goods with China and the European Union set records.The Commerce Department said Wednesday that the deficit in goods and services — the difference between what America sells and what it buys from other countries — rose to $50.1 billion in July from $45.7 billion in June. Exports slipped 1 per cent to $211.1 billion. Imports increased 0.9 per cent to a record $261.2 billion on increased purchases of trucks and computers.The deficit rose despite efforts by President Donald Trump to bring it down by renegotiating trade agreements and imposing taxes on imports.The United States has already slapped tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese goods in a dispute over Beijing’s aggressive efforts to challenge American technological dominance. It is taxing imported steel and aluminum and may target auto imports next, causing a rift with the EU. Trump also has threatened to exclude Canada from a revamped North American trade agreement.So far, the president’s aggressive policies have had little impact on the trade numbers. The goods deficit with China rose 10 per cent in July to a record $36.8 billion. The gap with the EU shot up 50 per cent to a record $17.6 billion and with Canada nearly 58 per cent to $3.1 billion. The July deficit with Mexico, though, plunged 25 per cent to $5.5 billion.So far this year, the trade deficit is up 7 per cent from January-July 2017.Trump views trade deficits as a sign of economic weakness, caused by bad trade deals and abusive behaviour by America’s trading partners.Mainstream economists blame persistent U.S. trade deficits on an economic reality that can’t be changed much by trade policy: Americans spend more than they produce, and imports fill the gap. The strong U.S. economy is also encouraging Americans to buy more foreign products.In July, the United States ran a deficit of $73.1 billion in goods such as cars and machinery, but recorded a surplus of more than $23 billon in services such as education and banking.last_img read more

Thousands of travellers affected in Europe by Ryanair strike

first_imgMADRID – Thousands of travellers in Europe saw their plans disrupted Friday after airline Ryanair cancelled more than 200 flights because of strikes by cabin crew in Spain, Belgium, Holland, Portugal, Italy and Germany.The budget airline says it had informed passengers of possible disruptions ahead of time, giving them time to adjust.In Tenerife, Spain, hundreds of passengers queued at Ryanair counters and dozens more at the Madrid airport as 86 flights of the low-cost company from or to Spain were cancelled, affecting some 16,000 passengers, according to Spanish unions.The unions blame the Ireland-based company for breaking talks over the company’s ratio of outsourced workers, working conditions and their demand for local contracts instead of Irish ones.In a statement Thursday, the company blamed cabin crews of competitors for organizing the strikes and blocking “significant progress” in labour negotiations.But the Brussels-based European Cabin Crew Association, which says it has more than 35,000 members, supported the walkout over what it described as the airline’s “inflexibility, single-mindedness and unreasonable behaviour.”The association alleged Ryanair was intimidating strikers by threatening them with job losses.As the company and labour groups traded accusations, some passengers left on the ground by the cancellations were galled.“They (Ryanair) sent me a text saying, ‘Have a look at your email.’ I don’t have an email,” said Eddie Hughes from Norfolk, England, at Madrid airport.Spanish cabin crew workers’ unions said cancellations could be increasing throughout the day. Airports in Valencia, Mallorca and Tenerife are the most affected, the unions said.In Portugal, 13 morning flights were cancelled and in the Netherlands, 14 of 22 flights were cancelled.last_img read more

UK leader deploys ministers to sell Brexit deal to public

first_imgLONDON — British Prime Minister Theresa May is deploying 30 members of her government throughout the country to rally support for her deal on leaving the European Union.Treasury chief Philip Hammond and Health Secretary Matt Hancock are among the senior ministers who are making appearances around Britain in an effort to win popular support for the agreement and put pressure on lawmakers to approve the deal.May says people in Britain “want us to get on with it,” and that it is important ministers speak with communities to explain how her Brexit deal “works for them.”The House of Commons is scheduled to vote on the plan Tuesday. May has shrugged off calls to postpone the vote despite forecasts that lawmakers are likely to reject it.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Council wont increase the tax rate in 2019

first_imgJoy said, “What is curious is why did BC Assesment increase the property values in the first place and then so quickly revert it back.”Although Commercial buildings were the highest number of rates that changed, Council did not want to punish everyone for a discrepancy that came from B.C. Assessment. Mayor Lori Ackerman said B.C. Assessment may catch on, as Council shared other businesses have the right to file against their property values as well.According to City Staff, in January, each year the BC Assessment Authority provides Local Governments with their projected assessments. Those numbers are used to determine what the annual LEVY will be. The levy is the number of tax dollars the city collects as well as the number used to balance the budget.BC Assessment final numbers are provided to municipalities at the end of the first quarter of the year. Local governments then finalize their budgets — the year. Local governments then finalize their budgets.To watch the Council’s decision, CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN – Counc has decided to transfer funds from the City’s tax stabilization reserve rather than increase property taxes.Council agreed unanimously that City staff increase the 2019 Return on Investment Income by $350,000 and transfer $251,514 from the Tax Stabilization Reserve to cover a budget shortfall of $601,514.David Joy, General Manager of corporate services said he received a final report from the B.C. Assessment Office last week.  Assessment appeals doubled from 99 in 2018 to 171 in 2019. The appeals saw the total assessed value of properties drop by $37,249,546 from January.last_img read more

BC Operators asked to bid on northern intercity bus routes

first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The Province of British Columbia, with support from the Federal Government, will be taking steps to ensure that people who live and work in Northern B.C. continue to have access to inter-city bus services.As directed by the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, B.C. Transit is conducting a competitive process to extend northern inter-city bus services through to March 31, 2021.According to the Government, the request for proposal aims to select one or more qualified transportation providers to operate on the four routes currently serviced by B.C. Bus North. The Province says the RFP will remain open on BCBid until August 22, 2019, at 2:00 p.m. Pacific time.Respondents are asked to state conditions that would lead to the inter-city transportation service to operate without government subsidies.All inquiries from interested parties are to be directed to B.C. Transit as outlined in the RFP.For more information, you can visit the BCBid website.last_img read more

NEATs Lets Go Outside Program

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – NEAT has recently announced the newest addition to their Wildling family of programming called ‘Let’s Go Outside’.Let’s Go Outside is geared towards children 6 years of age and younger and their families and/or caregivers.NEAT shares, Let’s Go Outside is a hands-on exploration of nature, which is led by Wildling Leaders, and will lead parent/caregiver and child(ren) into the heart of the forest to go on scavenger hunts, play games, create nature-themed art and crafts, sing songs and let your imagination soar. Upcoming events are being held on;Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 / 9:30 am – 11 amFriday, July 31st, 2019 / 9:30 am – 11 amWednesday, July 31st, 2019 / 9:30 am – 11 amWith more dates throughout AugustParent & Child Wednesdays ($5/Adult) and Childcare Provider Fridays ($10/Childcare Group)At the end of each session, parents, guardians and childcare providers will leave with a pamphlet of activities, crafts, songs and book lists to add to your “toolbox” of ideas that will keep you and your little one(s) busy for days!In order to participate, you must pre-register.To view the FB event page; CLICK HERElast_img read more

Site C Project to start construction of temporary bridge in early September

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – As part of clearing activities for the Site C Project, B.C. Hydro says construction will be starting in early September on a temporary bridge to an island in the Peace River near Halfway River.According to B.C. Hydro, the bridge will allow workers to remove vegetation from the island and prepare for the creation of the new reservoir.Hydro says the Rotary Forest Recreation Site on the island is now closed and is asking the public to stay clear of the area. Construction of the bridge is expected to last for several months.The bridge is expected to be dismantled in 2020, once the island has been cleared of vegetation.B.C. Hydro says clearing activities will occur on the banks of the Peace River every winter until the Site C Project is complete in 2023.For more information, you can visit the Site C Project website.last_img read more