Produce company initiative yields new findings on E coli

first_imgSep 17, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Nine research  teams that  shared $2 million from Fresh Express, a California produce company, recently presented their findings on Escherichia coli O157:H7, revealing some clues on the pathogen’s behavior on leafy greens that could lead to safer produce.Researchers presented their studies in Monterey, Calif., at a Sep 11 conference hosted by Fresh Express and attended by about 300 experts from government, academia, and the produce industry, according to a Sep 11 report from the Associated Press.In January 2007, Fresh Express, which produces bagged salads and other produce items, announced it would provide $2 million to fund research on how to keep E coli O157:H7 out of produce. The move came in the aftermath of several high-profile E coli outbreaks that were linked to leafy greens (though none of the company’s products have been implicated in a foodborne illness outbreak).No passage through plants Craig Hedberg, PhD, a foodborne disease expert and associate professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health in Minneapolis, said one of the research themes was exploring E coli’s ability to infect the interior tissues of plants through roots and leaves. Hedberg was a member of the Fresh Express advisory panel for the initiative.Based on the bulk of the findings, including those from the University of Georgia’s Center for Food Safety, led by Michael Doyle, E coli O157:H7 does not appear to enter through roots or leaves and disseminate through the internal tissues of the plant, Hedberg said. “Several studies lay to rest that concern.”One of the more surprising findings was that the pathogen appears to have unique biochemical mechanisms for interacting with plants, Hedberg said. An investigation by University of Arizona researchers, led by Jorge Girón, revealed that E coli O157:H7 can open stomata (tiny pores) on spinach leaves using a secretion system that is similar to those it uses to colonize cattle and human hosts. Girón and his colleagues suggested that E coli’s apparent ability to hide out in stomata may explain how the pathogen can evade produce cleaning processes.Hedberg said, “It’s fascinating biology, and now we understand more about how things happen in nature. The dynamic nature of the interaction between these enteric bacteria and plants has not previously been recognized.”Another notable finding was evidence suggesting that flies and other insects can spread E coli O157:H7 to leafy greens, he said. In May 2007 a research team from the University of Oklahoma, led by Jacqueline Fletcher, collected insects on farms in California’s Salinas Valley. They found several “filth fly species” that tested positive for E coli O157:H7, along with evidence of fly fecal and regurgitation spots on leaf surfaces. The group reported that the findings suggest a possible contamination route between cattle pastures and vegetable growing areas.However, when the investigators returned in 2008 to collect insects again from the same sites, they found that the fly populations were significantly lower, and they weren’t able to culture E coli O157:H7 from the insects. They suggested that the presence of the pathogen may be transient in some settings.The insect findings raise new questions and warrant further study, Hedberg said.In some of the other research studies, investigators reported that:Leafy greens can be sanitized with ozone treatment during vacuum cooling (a group from Ohio State University led by Ahmed Yousef)Composting doesn’t always inactivate E coli O157:H7 and other pathogens, and weather may play a role in survivability (researchers from Clemson University, headed by Xiuping Jiang)Naturally occurring microorganisms on fresh lettuce and spinach may have an antagonistic effect on E coli O157:H7 growth (investigators from the University of Georgia, led by Mark Harrison)Shredding, cleaning, and other processing methods provide multidirectional transfer points for E coli O157:H7 in iceberg lettuce and baby spinach, and a new predictive model can help guide risk assessment and safety efforts (a group from Michigan State University, headed by Elliot Ryser).Expert panel set objectivesFresh Express has said it funded the research and shared the results to benefit the produce industry and consumers. The company’s scientific advisory panel, consisting of unpaid volunteers that have been meeting since May 2006 to identify research gaps and administer the initiative, is chaired by Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH. He directs the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, which publishes the CIDRAP Web site.Osterholm told CIDRAP News that the Fresh Express research funding sparked the accomplishment of a great deal of applied research in a short time. “What we did in 16 months would have taken traditional academic or government-funded researchers 3 or 4 years,” he said.The key to the initiative’s success was having an expert review group establish research objectives ahead of time, Osterholm said. The review panel also helped determine who among the 65 grant applicants received funding.Fresh Express and its science advisory panel hope to publish all nine of the studies in a single issue of a journal, he said. “And we’re looking at what we can do to keep this research model moving.”Officials from Fresh Express said in a statement to CIDRAP News that they were thankful for the advisory panel’s guidance and extremely pleased with the results of the research initiative. Company President Tanjos E. Viviani and Executive Vice-President Jim Lugg said they were happy with “the remarkable [conference] turn-out from growers and harvesters, other key manufacturers, regulators, customers and food safety experts.” They added, “We are also very excited about the [research] results. We intend to carefully evaluate them and determine how or when we might be able to act on those that are most relevant for us.”A future for ‘fast-track’ research?Jim Prevor, a produce industry expert who hosts a blog called Perishable Pundit, attended the Monterey conference and praised the “fast track” research initiative. However, he warned produce industry officials not to dismiss the benefits of traditional peer-reviewed academic research.”Although this type of quick turnaround can provide important clues for further research and provide the trade and regulators with some notion of how research is progressing, we think demanding instantaneous revolutions in horticultural and processing practices is too much,” Prevor wrote.He said the Fresh Express initiative showed that a rapid, applied research model can work, but he questioned how similar projects in the future might be feasible. He wrote that the Center for Produce Safety, a University of California, Davis, research institute funded through produce industry support, might be a good site to continue studies based on the Fresh Express model. However, he added that fundraising, staffing, and balancing research priorities would pose big challenges.”For today, however, the industry owes a big hat tip to Fresh Express. We know more and have a clearer path to food safety than we did last week. That is a formidable accomplishment,” Prevor wrote.See also:Apr 13, 2007, CIDRAP News story “Produce firm names winners of E coli research grants”Jan 19, 2007, CIDRAP News story “California produce firm to fund E coli research”Perishable Pundit blog sitelast_img read more

Lakers suffer ugly road loss to Hawks, sink below .500 going into All-Star break

first_img Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Of course, ugly losses to bad teams are familiar to the Lakers over the past few months: They’ve also lost to sure-fire lottery teams such as the Cavaliers, the Knicks and the Timberwolves since James was hurt on Christmas Day, back when the team was 20-14.A common theme discussed among the Lakers after the game was a need to get away during the All-Star break and decompress. Bruising losses to Indiana and Philadelphia have added to the pressure the Lakers have been feeling since before the trade deadline, and Atlanta seemed to be a natural point for players to get some space. Walton said he hoped players would reflect.“It’s different for everyone,” he said. “But coming back re-energized with the idea of, ‘let’s try to do something special. Let’s sacrifice, let’s go out and give for the team.’ And that’s what we were talking about earlier (in the season), and I think we’ll get back to that.”On a night with many hung heads, Kuzma pined for something simpler.“We just gotta make the game fun,” he said. “We just gotta remember why we started playing this game. Play for fun, not as a business and not get too much stress out on the court. I think the All-Star break is gonna be really good for us, especially getting a break with everybody, and get to recharge, and get back a new sense of focus.” How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years PreviousHawks forward Taurean Prince celebrates after a Hawks basket during the second half of Tuesday’s game against the Lakers in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (9) reaches in to knock the ball away from Hawks forward John Collins (20) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Trae Young (11) drives against Lakers forward LeBron James (23) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsHawks forward DeAndre’ Bembry (95) scores against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers LeBron James dunks over Atlanta Hawks Taurean Prince during the second half in a NBA basketball game on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) drives to the basket as Atlanta Hawks center Dewayne Dedmon (14) defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Trae Young goes to the basket past Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James during the first half in a NBA basketball game on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)Los Angeles Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (9) drives past Atlanta Hawks guard Kent Bazemore (24) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Lakers president of basketball operations Magic Johnson laughs as he sits courtside during the second half of Tuesday’s loss to the Hawks in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Kent Bazemore (24) gets past Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma (0) races to the basket as Atlanta Hawks center Dewayne Dedmon (14) defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks forward John Collins blocks a shot by Los Angeles Lakers LeBron James during the second half in a NBA basketball game on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)Atlanta Hawks guard Kent Bazemore (24) goes in for a basket as Los Angeles Lakers guard Lance Stephenson (6) defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward Brandon Ingram (14) drives against Atlanta Hawks guard Kevin Huerter (3) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) shoots during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Lakers forward LeBron James (23) argues with an official during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James is shown during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) goes in for a basket as Atlanta Hawks center Dewayne Dedmon (14) defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Kent Bazemore (24) goes to the basket against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) comes down with a rebound during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks forward Taurean Prince (12) reacts during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Trae Young (11) is defended by Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks head coach Lloyd Pierce is shown against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks guard Kent Bazemore (24) goes to the basket against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) argues with an official during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks forward Vince Carter (15) is guarded by Los Angeles Lakers center Moritz Wagner (15) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks forward DeAndre’ Bembry (95) is shown in action against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Rapper Gucci Mane watches during the second half of an NBA basketball game between Los Angeles Lakers and Atlanta Hawks Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) shoots a free throw against the Atlanta Hawks during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (9) goes in for a basket as Atlanta Hawks forward John Collins (20) defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) against the Atlanta Hawks during the second half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Atlanta Hawks forward John Collins (20) attempts a dunk during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Hawks forward Taurean Prince celebrates after a Hawks basket during the second half of Tuesday’s game against the Lakers in Atlanta. The Hawks won 117-113. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (9) reaches in to knock the ball away from Hawks forward John Collins (20) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)NextShow Caption1 of 32Lakers guard Rajon Rondo (9) reaches in to knock the ball away from Hawks forward John Collins (20) during the first half of an NBA basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)ExpandATLANTA — The last time LeBron James missed the NBA playoffs was in 2005. It’s a streak older than the iPhone, than YouTube – one that has lasted through three White House administrations.If the Lakers (28-29) have more nights like Tuesday in Atlanta, brace for that run to end.In the final game before the All-Star break, the Lakers fell 117-113 to a Hawks team (19-38) with far more youth and far lower expectations. It was the kind of defeat that will vex and pain the franchise, which is looking to make its first playoff appearance in six years. Finishing their season-long six-game trip at 2-4, the Lakers dropped below .500 going into the league’s annual mid-February intermission – something that was previously unthinkable for a team sporting James.James himself was brooding afterward, grim and businesslike in a locker room that was blanketed by a somber hush. Asked about a 28-point, 16-assist, 11-rebound triple-double, James said he would “throw that game in the trash.” Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers center_img Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed “I mean, we missed – how many layups did we miss?” Coach Luke Walton said afterward, with exasperation. “I’ll have to check the film but three, four layups in the fourth? … we probably missed seven or eight layups throughout the whole game. Had some open looks from three that didn’t go in. You got to make them. If you want to win in the NBA, you got to make those plays.”The Lakers even got themselves within three points in the final 20 seconds, but they were forced to foul Kevin Heurter, who made a clinching free throw with four seconds left. The Lakers’ last possession ended on a turnover.James was more distributor (16 assists) than scorer for much of the game, not seeming particularly pleased with the officiating as the night wore on. He scored 10 of his 28 points in the final quarter, but he finished just 8 for 20 from the field, including 3 for 10 from 3-point range.He wore disgust on his face as the Lakers filed out of the arena after the 18-point fourth quarter.With 25 games left when the Lakers resume on Feb. 21, only 10 games will come against teams who currently have losing records. They find themselves 2.5 games behind the Clippers (who traded away their best player) and the Sacramento Kings (who are pushing for the playoffs) with a difficult Western Conference-heavy finish to the schedule.Related Articles AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersBut he suggested also that his faith in his postseason streak is not yet eroding: “You either make it or don’t make it. That’s when you worry about it.”As a group, the Lakers might need to worry sooner.The chief problem was again on defense, as the Hawks rained down 16 3-pointers in the game. That included triples from rookie Trae Young (22 points) and Taurean Prince (23 points), but also unlikely candidates in Alex Len (3 for 4 from the arc) and Vince Carter (11 points). It was the seventh straight game the Lakers have given up 115 points or more, and it was particularly tough in the first quarter when the Hawks made 10 of their 3-pointers on their way to 38 points.But in the critical stretch when the Lakers could have taken control as the defense finally clicked, the offense completely faltered: during a stretch from the 8:47 mark of the fourth quarter to the 2:14 mark, the Lakers did not make a field goal. That fruitless run included eight consecutive possessions in which the Lakers turned the ball over or missed their shot, including missed layups at the rim by Rajon Rondo, Kyle Kuzma and Reggie Bullock.The Hawks scored just seven points in the final 6:33, but it was enough. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Taylor Hall chirps Ryan Strome for slapshot video

first_imgMORE: Social media roasts Maple LeafsThen came the chirp of all chirps from the Arizona Coyotes’ Taylor Hall, who is, by the way, an upcoming unrestricted free agent this summer.Is that all you need to work on if you play with Panarin? 🤣 https://t.co/GReg9eb3td— Taylor Hall (@hallsy09) March 26, 2020Well, Taylor, considering Strome was having a career year with 59 points (18 goals, 41 assists) in 70 games  — the answer is yes. While the NHL’s 2019-20 season is currently on pause and players are quarantined, many players have taken to Twitter to show fans just what they’re doing with their newfound spare time.On Thursday, the New York Rangers’ Ryan Strome posted a video of himself firing off slapshots … with tennis balls … on a basketball court … in slippers.  Just finished working on my game…went 7/7 today! Back to Call of Duty. Goodbye Twitter👋🏼😂 pic.twitter.com/0CB3laNC9R— Ryan Strome (@strome18) March 26, 2020Who are we to judge?Well, maybe his fellow NHLers are qualified. Former teammate and current Colorado Avalanche forward Vladislav Namestnikov replied: “Some will say it’s fake” with a sad emoji.last_img read more