Nursery owner donates lots of green to beautify Pico Rivera

first_img Officials said the greenery will help the city look its best during the upcoming Community Pride Day, which is slated for April 14. For more on this story, pick up tomorrow’s Whittier Daily News. 165Let’s talk business.Catch up on the business news closest to you with our daily newsletter. Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PICO RIVERA — City parks and recreation coordinator Efrain Lee was looking for donations of plants, trees and other greenery for an upcoming citywide beautification project. Pico Rivera resident Julian Damas, meanwhile, was trying to donate some of the inventory from his Bellflower nursery, which he is closing down. “I had the intention to donate, but I didnt know somebody to contact,” said Damas, 66. “Then I thought, this is the perfect person.” On Monday, Damas and Lee met, and Damas donated several truckloads of trees, shrubs and other plants to the city. In all, he presented Pico Rivera with more than $13,000 in tecomaria, cupania, eugenia and oleander plants and trees.last_img read more

Nature: 3.8 Billion Years of R&D

first_img(Visited 49 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Scientists continue mining the biomimicry bonanza, but some still give all the credit to time and evolution.Here are three new biomimetics articles about plants.Sunflowers as solar energy models:  A clever short video on Live Science finds nature, once again, providing the optimum solution to a problem.  The problem is arranging mirrors in a giant solar collection facility so as to minimize shadows.  The solution: mimic the sunflower.  The spiral arrangement of florets in the center of a sunflower, following the Fibonacci series, turns out to pack the most light collection in the smallest space while minimizing shadows on other mirrors.  The video did not mention another property that solar farms would have difficulty imitating: sunflowers exist on stalks that can turn and follow the sun.Diatoms can feed, speed the world:  We are surrounded by bounteous resources we can hardly imagine: microscopic organisms in water that live in glass houses, called diatoms.  PhysOrg writes, “Ancient diatoms could make biofuels, electronics and health food—at the same time.”  Researchers at Oregon State are creating a “photosynthetic biorefinery,” the article says, getting the little nanofactories to make customized products by special order.  Give them water, some minerals and sunshine, and they could make a steady stream of affordable, eco-friendly products: biofuels, biomedical products, and even semiconductors.  “The key to all of this is the diatom itself, a natural nanotechnology factory that has been found in the fossil record for more than 100 million years.”Drugs on demand from plants:  Plants make a host of aromatic compounds they use for signaling, defense and symbiosis.  Now, mimicking “a crucial but obscure biochemical phenomenon,” scientists at Scripps have “followed nature’s lead” to figure out how to make terpenes, compounds hard to synthesize in the lab but made routinely by plants.  This could lead to faster and cheaper manufacture of drugs like the anti-cancer agent Taxol.  Science Daily quoted the senior investigator who said, “It’s exciting for us because we’re now making molecules that have never been made in the laboratory before, and we’ve done this by first observing what nature does.”Biomimicry on a RollOne article really excited about biomimetics can be found on PhysOrg from Mother Nature Network, titled: “Biomimicry: Science inspired by nature could feed the hungry, reduce impact of technology.”  This implies that many of our problems in civilization are not for lack of resources, but lack of know-how.  That know-how is all around us in plants and animals.  Whales, butterflies and fungi are just three of the examples in the article that can lead to more efficient machinery, more productive food crops, better medical devices and much, much more.“Biomimicry looks for how nature performs a function,” Marie Zanowick, a certified biomimicry professional for the Environmental Protection Agency, told Boulder Weekly. “It mimics natural strategy and the best design principles on this planet.““Design principles” as humans devise them usually require many brain cycles of research and development (R&D).  That’s true in nature, too, the article said.  In order to adapt, be resource-efficient, integrate development with growth, be eco-friendly and responsive to the environment, living things have learned R&D.  “It’s based on 3.8 billion years of research and development, and the only organisms that survive are the ones that follow life’s principles.”Need we keep repeating that neo-Darwinism is completely, totally, and irrevocably incapable of R&D?  Evolution is blind.  It has no foresight.  It has no purpose.  It cannot, therefore, come up with “design principles.”  Giving it billions of years doesn’t help; it makes things worse.Once we purge the last remaining fallacies out of biomimetics, it is poised to usher in a golden age of science grounded on what should be its foundation: intelligent design.last_img read more

Remarks for consul general Yusuf Omar

first_imgHowever, it was not just the prospect of escaping those winters that caused me such excitement when I learnt my next assignment was to be Sao Paulo. What got my adrenalin going was the prospect of playing a part, however small, in the building of a historic relationship. What Brazil and South Africa and our other partners in the so-called south do together in the years and decades ahead will, I am confident, mean better lives for untold millions of our people. Together, we are striving for a system of global governance which is more democratic and which more accurately reflects the world as it is, rather than as it was half a century ago. Together, we are working to achieve a new set of international trade rules that will empower the hitherto disempowered to lift themselves out of poverty, for the betterment of all. Our countries share many daunting challenges, but we also share a capacity to innovate and find solutions.. For example, who could fail to be profoundly impressed by Brazil’s achievements in the fields of alternative energy or combating HIV? South Africans, too, are ingenious people. A third of our petroleum needs we furnish from coal. With the pebble bed modular reactor we are on the threshold of revolutionizing the economics of nuclear power. In Paris this week we are showing off what could well be the world’s first truly affordable electric car. .Technological problems are not the only things we are good at. We have successfully confronted political and social problems that have left less fortunate societies in ashes. Many have called the way we brought down the curtain on apartheid a miracle or they have attributed it to the greatness of one undoubtedly great man, Nelson Mandela. But our democratic transition was neither miracle nor the work of any individual. It was a testament, like Mandela himself, to the content of our people’s character. .Yes, we have a serious crime problem in South Africa. Paulistanos would be the first to admit that theirs is not the safest community in the world, either. We share with you the reality of being rapidly urbanizing economies characterized, as such economies always are, by major disparities in wealth. These are harsh realities that breed crime. But the criminals are not representative of who we are, Brazilian or South African. The fundamental spirit of South Africa is captured in the word ubuntu. It is a difficult world to translate but is closely akin to the quality the Roman philosopher Seneca called humanitas or humanity. This he defined as ”the quality which stops one being arrogant towards one’s fellows, or being acrimonious. In words, in actions, in emotions humanity reveals herself as kind and good natured towards all. To her the troubles of anyone else are her own, and anything that benefits herself she welcomes primarily because it will be of benefit to someone else.” Like every young democracy, we have our good days and our bad days, but the good preponderate and sometimes observers mistake for bad days that are in fact very good. Some have been alarmed by our recent change of leadership. But I would urge you to consider this. Our ruling party’s decision to recall President Mbeki was no different that the British Labour party’s decision to replace Tony Blair while in office or the Conservative party’s to replace Margaret Thatcher. Nobody for a moment thought that Britain’s democracy or its institutions were under threat at those junctures. No one should think that about South Africa, either. Our democracy and our institutions – our judiciary, our robust free press, our financial system — all are solid, rooted in what I believe is one of the most stable societies anywhere. One of our newspaper columnists last week compared South Africa with a pond when you throw a stone into it. There is a splash and there are ripples, but calm always returns. South Africa, he wrote, was not a piece of glass that shatters. We are also a very practical, results-oriented people. You can see that in our economic policies and you can see it in our diplomacy. I very much hope my own tenure here in Sao Paulo will serve to further illustrate this. I am looking forward to reaching out and far and wide as I possibly can in this great region and working to build partnerships that will make a real difference in people’s lives. Thank you for your warm and generous welcome.last_img read more

Råbjerg Mile – GC21787 – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 25, 2012

first_imgShare with your Friends:More Jumping into soft sandEver wonder what would it be like if the ground literally started to move under your feet? Geocachers who visited the Råbjerg Mile (GC21787) EarthCache know exactly what it’s like.Located at the northern tip of Denmark, between the Danish cities of Skagen and Frederikshavn, the Råbjerg Mile is the largest migrating sand dune in Northern Europe. It contains millions of cubic meters of sand and moves up to 18 meters (59 feet) every year. Geocachers can enjoy this migrating wonder and observe many types of birds that make it their travelling home by visiting the difficulty 1.5, terrain 2 EarthCache.Denmark once had many shifting dunes, even larger than the Råbjerg Mile. These dunes caused many problems for the people living in their paths. So, in the mid-19th century, the state bought the land under the dunes so that it could plant dune grasses and conifers that would help stabilize it. They then left the Råbjerg Mile so that future generations would remember both the challenges and the beauty of these shifting sand dunes.Marking sand angelsMichael, a.k.a. WAUZZZ4B has given fellow Premium Member geocachers yet another reason to see and experience nature at its best since creating the EarthCache in November of 2009.Geocachers everywhere can learn a lot about this dune just by reading the detailed cache page. But nearly 450 Premium Members got to experience this EarthCache for what it’s worth and share their experiences by posting more than 530 breathtaking images.With Geocaching.com’s request, Michael has agreed to temporarily grant access to basic members for an opportunity to experience and log this EarthCache.One geocacher who logged this Premium Cache wrote, “We heard about the dune from some friends who visited many years ago. We decided that we wanted to check out this place during our visit to Denmark. Sure enough, there’s an EarthCache, which gave us even more reason to come out and log our visit. We didn’t realize how beautiful this place is. Absolutely stunning scenery and by far the biggest sand box we’ve ever been in!”For more information on Geocaching Premium features, such as Premium Caches, visit Geocaching.com/Premium.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com.Soft sand between toes. SharePrint RelatedNamib Desert, Namibia (GC14W63) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 8, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”Bruneau Sand Dunes GC10F12 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 31, 2011October 31, 2011In “Community”Geocaching country souvenir: NamibiaDecember 8, 2017In “Community”last_img read more

Rahul attacks Modi on farmers’ plight

first_imgTaking forward his ‘question-a-day’ campaign, Congress vice-president Rahul Gandhi on December 7 targeted Prime Minister Narendra Modi over the problems afflicting the farm sector and farmers.Asking his 9th question in the series, he asked, “Neither loan waiver, nor remunerative price for produce, neither received crop insurance benefit, nor were tubewells installed.”The Congress leader also used the ‘Gabbar’ jibe to target the Prime Minister. “Agriculture hit by Gabbar Singh, land snatched and the (Annadatta) farmer was rendered useless. PM sahib, explain why such step-motherly treatment with the farm labour?” he said on Twitter.Mr. Gandhi had earlier termed the Goods and Services Tax as Gabbar Singh Tax to attack the government.Under the ongoing offensive, the Congress leader is using the tagline 22 saal ka hisab, Gujarat maange jawab (22 years of account, Gujarat demands answers), in the run-up to Gujarat elections starting December 9.The Congress vice-president has been tweeting to pose daily questions to the Prime Minister over the performance of the BJP in Gujarat and its “unkept” promises over the past 22 years of its rule in the State.last_img read more

Navios Subsidiary Fined for Dumping Oily Waste at Sea

first_imgPiraeus-based Navimax Corporation, a subsidiary of Greek shipowner Navios Maritime Holdings Inc., was sentenced to a USD 2 million fine by a U.S. district court for discharging oily waste at sea.The company was fined for violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and obstructing a coast guard investigation. In addition, the federal district court placed Navimax on probation for four years.The discharge was made from Navimax operated 750-foot long oil tanker, Nave Cielo, in November 2017, in international waters, after the ship left New Orleans en route to Belgium, an investigation by the U.S. Coast Guard has determined.The 2007-built LR1 tanker, flagged in the Cayman Islands, was bought by Navios Maritime Acquisition from Germany’s Ernst Jacob KG in 2010 for USD 43 million, data from VesselsValue shows. The current value of the 74, 700 dwt ship is USD 14.9 million.Prior to a formal inspection on December 7, 2017, the U.S. Coast Guard boarded the vessel near Delaware City when a crewmember gave the officers a thumb drive containing two videos, depicting a high-volume discharge of dark brown and black oil waste from a five-inch pipe, located 15-feet above water level, the U.S. Department of Justice said.As informed, during the Coast Guard boarding on December 7, 2017, crew members presented the ship’s Oil Record Book, which did not record this discharge.“The defendant violated environmental laws that protect our marine environment from harmful pollution,” said U.S. Attorney for the District of Delaware David C. Weiss.  “The conviction and criminal fine, reinforced by a four-year term of probation, during which the defendant’s fleet of ships will be monitored, ensures that defendant is held accountable.  The message to the shipping industry is clear: environmental crimes at sea will not be tolerated.”  Video Courtesy: U.S. Department of Justicelast_img read more