Injury Affected Athletes in Kampala

first_imgAndrew Kpehe Two Liberian representatives at the 42nd edition of the World Cross Country Championships in Kampala, Uganda, Lucy Massaquoi and Andrew Kpehe, could not live up to expectation.Lucy, 18, crossed the finish-line at 93rd place in the 5K junior race on Sunday with a time of 27:41. She competed along with over 400 athletes from 59 countries.Andrew finished 96th in the 8K junior races with a disjointed arm, and finished at 30:14.“He fell on his arm climbing the hill,” said head Coach Samuel Cooper, who also blamed the hot and humid conditions.“Kampala is very hot and the hills on the course make the race chaotic,” Cooper said.The World Cross Country Championships was held at Kololo Independence Grounds in Kampala, Uganda on Sunday March 26.The race, which had a field of 108 runners, was won by 19 year old Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, who was the defending champion, in a time of 18.34.Kenya dominated the 42nd edition.Athlete Lucy MassaquoiGraced by the first citizen of Uganda, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, the races were run on a great course with risings and depressions under relatively warm and humid conditions, and watched by a great and passionate crowd.Kenya won the mixed relay, as well as the senior individual and team women plus men events to amass 10 medals in total (3 gold, 4 silvers and 3 bronzes).Ethiopia took gold in the team event for junior men and Uganda clinched gold in junior men (individual).104 and 106 athletes took part in the Women and Men U-20 events respectively.Kenya won the mixed relay. Kenya’s mixed relay team consisted of Asbel Kiprop (5:19), Wilfred Nzisa Mbithe (6:07), Bernard Kipkorir Koros (5:22) and Beatrice Chepkoech (5:58).17 year old Ugandan Jacob Kiplimo claimed Uganda’s first ever gold medal in World Cross Country history.Kiplimo said shortly after the medal presentation ceremony that he anticipated his victory.“Yes, yes, yes. I always thought I could win. It was a very good race. When I decided to break away going into the first lap, I knew I was going to win,” he said.Ethiopia’s Amdework Walelegn, who finished second in the junior race, cast blame on the Ugandan crowd.“I am happy but not satisfied with second. The crowd made it very difficult for me to run according to my plan,” he said.Meanwhile, Richard Yator Kimunyan, who took third in the junior men’s race, castigated the challenging course.“The course was difficult although I could have done better but I miscalculated towards the end,” he noted.Ethiopia took gold in the women junior (individual event), as well as the junior men and women team events.Geofrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya had the last laugh when he outpaced Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegai with one lap to go.Cheptegai finished a distant 30th but it was good enough to help team Uganda scoop bronze.Uganda’s President Museveni and the first lady, Janet Museveni, who also doubles as the country’s Minister of Education and Sports, graced the Sunday afternoon event.Other dignitaries included the IAAF president Sebatisan Coe and his African based vice president Hamad Kalkaba and Minister of Presidency in charge of Kampala Betty Namisango Kamya were some of the other high profile personalities in Kololo.A total of 557 athletes took part in the 2017 IAAF championship.Prize MoneyA lump sum of $310,000 (sh1.1bn) was offered for the top performers. A total of $140,000 (sh498m) went to the top individual race winners in the two races.In the team events of both senior races, another $140,000 was also on offer. Here $20,000 (sh71m) was up for grabs for each of the winning team.There was also $30,000 for the inaugural relay race.The winning team (Kenya) grabbed $12,000 (sh42.7m). The prize money for the mixed relay applied to the top four teams.The mass race of non-professional athletes crowned the evening.       Final Standings:Kenya – 95 PointsEthiopia – 76 PointsUganda – 32 PointsEritrea – 15 PointsBahrain – 13 PointsUnited States – 11 PointsMorocco – 8 PointsTanzania – 8 PointsJapan – 7 PointsTurkey – 6 PointsSpain – 3 pointsBurundi – 2 PointsSouth Africa – 2 PointsPeru – 1 Point     Medal Table:Kenya – 10 Total (3 Gold, 4 Silver, 3 Bronze)Ethiopia – 8 Total (4 Gold, 4 Silver, 0 Bronze)Uganda – 3 Total (1 Gold, 2 Bronze)Bahrain – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Eritrea – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Turkey – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Two Liberian representatives at the 42nd edition of the World Cross Country Championships in Kampala, Uganda, Lucy Massaquoi and Andrew Kpehe, could not live up to expectation.Lucy, 18, crossed the finish-line at 93rd place in the 5K junior race on Sunday with a time of 27:41. She competed along with over 400 athletes from 59 countries.Andrew finished 96th in the 8K junior races with a disjointed arm, and finished at 30:14.“He fell on his arm climbing the hill,” said head Coach Samuel Cooper, who also blamed the hot and humid conditions.“Kampala is very hot and the hills on the course make the race chaotic,” Cooper said.The World Cross Country Championships was held at Kololo Independence Grounds in Kampala, Uganda on Sunday March 26.The race, which had a field of 108 runners, was won by 19 year old Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, who was the defending champion, in a time of 18.34.Kenya dominated the 42nd edition.Graced by the first citizen of Uganda, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, the races were run on a great course with risings and depressions under relatively warm and humid conditions, and watched by a great and passionate crowd.Kenya won the mixed relay, as well as the senior individual and team women plus men events to amass 10 medals in total (3 gold, 4 silvers and 3 bronzes).Ethiopia took gold in the team event for junior men and Uganda clinched gold in junior men (individual).104 and 106 athletes took part in the Women and Men U-20 events respectively.Kenya won the mixed relay. Kenya’s mixed relay team consisted of Asbel Kiprop (5:19), Wilfred Nzisa Mbithe (6:07), Bernard Kipkorir Koros (5:22) and Beatrice Chepkoech (5:58).17 year old Ugandan Jacob Kiplimo claimed Uganda’s first ever gold medal in World Cross Country history.Kiplimo said shortly after the medal presentation ceremony that he anticipated his victory.“Yes, yes, yes. I always thought I could win. It was a very good race. When I decided to break away going into the first lap, I knew I was going to win,” he said.Ethiopia’s Amdework Walelegn, who finished second in the junior race, cast blame on the Ugandan crowd.“I am happy but not satisfied with second. The crowd made it very difficult for me to run according to my plan,” he said.Meanwhile, Richard Yator Kimunyan, who took third in the junior men’s race, castigated the challenging course.“The course was difficult although I could have done better but I miscalculated towards the end,” he noted.Ethiopia took gold in the women junior (individual event), as well as the junior men and women team events.Geofrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya had the last laugh when he outpaced Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegai with one lap to go.Cheptegai finished a distant 30th but it was good enough to help team Uganda scoop bronze.Uganda’s President Museveni and the first lady, Janet Museveni, who also doubles as the country’s Minister of Education and Sports, graced the Sunday afternoon event.Other dignitaries included the IAAF president Sebatisan Coe and his African based vice president Hamad Kalkaba and Minister of Presidency in charge of Kampala Betty Namisango Kamya were some of the other high profile personalities in Kololo.A total of 557 athletes took part in the 2017 IAAF championship.Prize MoneyA lump sum of $310,000 (sh1.1bn) was offered for the top performers. A total of $140,000 (sh498m) went to the top individual race winners in the two races.In the team events of both senior races, another $140,000 was also on offer. Here $20,000 (sh71m) was up for grabs for each of the winning team.There was also $30,000 for the inaugural relay race.The winning team (Kenya) grabbed $12,000 (sh42.7m). The prize money for the mixed relay applied to the top four teams.The mass race of non-professional athletes crowned the evening.       Final Standings:Kenya – 95 PointsEthiopia – 76 PointsUganda – 32 PointsEritrea – 15 PointsBahrain – 13 PointsUnited States – 11 PointsMorocco – 8 PointsTanzania – 8 PointsJapan – 7 PointsTurkey – 6 PointsSpain – 3 pointsBurundi – 2 PointsSouth Africa – 2 PointsPeru – 1 Point     Medal Table:Kenya – 10 Total (3 Gold, 4 Silver, 3 Bronze)Ethiopia – 8 Total (4 Gold, 4 Silver, 0 Bronze)Uganda – 3 Total (1 Gold, 2 Bronze)Bahrain – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Eritrea – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Turkey – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

What irked 49ers Kyle Shanahan about 4-12 season the most?

first_imgThose three that got away were losses at the … Click HERE if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device.SANTA CLARA — Coach Kyle Shanahan thought the 49ers should have won … wait, only seven games?Instead, the 49ers went 4-12 in Shanahan’s second season, and as he conducted Monday’s autopsy, he offered well-reasoned rationale.“We were close in a lot of games, but there were three in particular that really bother me that we should have finished and won,” Shanahan said.last_img read more

Brand South Africa and partners rally to contribute to the provision of quality education

first_imgJohannesburg, Friday 28 October 2016 – Brand South Africa in partnership with Rally to Read and Barefoot No More, will contribute to national efforts to improve literacy and education in the Western Cape on Saturday 29 October 2016.Brand South Africa will, through its flagship domestic mobilisation programme, Play Your Part – work with Barefoot No More and Rally to Read to contribute to national efforts to address challenges in literacy levels in South Africa.  This partnership will also contribute to the goals set out in the National Development Plan (NDP) for quality education and skills development.Rally to Read is an initiative launched by the McCarthy Motor Group and is successfully organised by Bidvest to help improve education in rural South Africa. Every year, Rally to Read travels across ten school districts, in nine provinces with the aid of McCarthy Motor Group to distribute reading and educational resources to disadvantaged schools.These resources include literacy materials, toys, books, games, a ‘box library’ as well as shock absorbent school shoes made of innovative material developed by Barefoot No More. Teachers in these schools also benefit from this initiative as they are upskilled and empowered through the READ training programme.Brand South Africa’s Play your Part team will join Rally to Read and Barefoot No More to distribute these resources while applauding teachers for taking up the baton  to educate. Citizens will also be encouraged to contribute actively and positively to the development of their communities.Weekend Programme for Rally to Read TimeSaturday 29th October 2016  06h30All participants to meet at McCarthy Toyota Table View (Cnr Koeberg Rd & Blaauwberg Road, Table View)Park according to your team colours in the designated parking areas.We will provide a short briefing on the project and the schools whilst enjoying rusks, muffins, coffee and/or tea.Your team leader will contact you a week before the Rally to confirm all details.07h30Depart Cape Town in your teams, for visits to 2 schools in the Langebaan, Velddrif area.This is our second visit to these schools. A short presentation at each school; symbolic signing of the contract between the school and the project and a “tour” of the school.A picnic lunch will be enjoyed during the day.Note:  The rally and READ Educational Trust will work in support of these 8 schools for 3 consecutive years: 2015, 2016, 2017.Rally to Read has positively impacted the lives of many communities and schools:By contributing over R86 million raised for rural education1013 – schools have been on the programme (1998-2015)170 – rallies to date, covering all parts of rural South Africa (1998 – 2015)53 – Different areas/school clusters supported (1998 – 2015)17 – Series of Rallies completed (1998 – 2015)Play your Part will return to the Western Cape in November 2016 when it will introduce its interactive and innovate PYP cube to communities to inspire active citizenship for meaningful change in South Africa.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comVisit www.brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

Huge surprise bolsters bears

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Today was a huge surprise with corn and soybean yields higher, not lower. The market is not taking out post report lows in the minutes following the noon release. It could indicate end users are stepping in to cover needs.USDA put the U.S. corn production at 14.184 billion bushels with a yield of 169.9 bushels per acre. Ending stocks were pegged at 2.335 billion bushels. Last month corn ending stocks were 2.27 billion bushels. USDA put the U.S. soybean production at 4.43 billion bushels with a yield of 49.9 bushels per acre. Soybean ending stocks were estimated at 475 million bushels. Last month soybean ending stocks were 475 million bushels. Ending soybean stocks were unchanged due to higher crush and higher exports.As the noon hour approached, corn was down 5 cents, soybeans were down 2 cents, with wheat unchanged. Shortly after the report, corn was down 8 cents, soybeans were 13 cents, with wheat down 3 centsGoing into the USDA report today, the average trade estimate for corn production was 14.03 billion bushels with a yield of 168.2 while ending stocks were estimated at 2.17 billion bushels. Last month USDA in a bearish report had U.S. corn production at 14.15 billion bushels and a yield of 169.5 bushels per acre. The average trade estimate for soybean production this month was 4.32 billion bushels and a yield of 48.8. Soybean production in August was 4.38 billion bushels and a yield of 49.4.World ending stocks of wheat did decrease in spite of increased production in Russia. Russia has been in the headlines in recent days due to reports of reducing rail rates to move grain from the interior to export locations. There is uncertainty if the rate reductions are for just wheat or all grains.World ending stocks of corn and soybeans did increase. World ending stocks of wheat were down ever so slightly.Both corn and soybeans had double digit losses with the Aug. 10 report. Corn was down 15 cents while soybeans were down 33 cents on report day. For the September report, if you expected USDA corn yields to be reduced at least 2 bushels per acre and the soybean yield at least 1 bushel per acre, you are likely going to be disappointed with the report today. The October report will have lots of actual harvest data to help determine corn and soybean yields. This report will not have the luxury of very much harvest data to determine production and yields.While it is not a headline banner that grabs attention from all or even many, watch corn used for ethanol with old crop corn to increase from the August report. Last month USDA put corn used for ethanol at 5.45 billion bushels. The weekly ethanol report for much of July and August had extremely strong corn usage. Any increased usage will decrease old corn ending stocks and flow into the new crop table with a smaller beginning stocks number. In recent months USDA has now included sorghum used for ethanol in this weekly report. From September 2016 to July 2017 roughly 107 million bushels of sorghum was used in ethanol production.Ohio should see several days of rain this week as the leftovers from Hurricane Irma pass through. For the dry areas of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, it will be too little too late for many producers to do any good for soybeans or corn. December CBOT corn has traded in a range of $3.52-$3.62 this month. November CBOT soybeans had a range in September before the USDA report today of $9.52-$9.77. Look for the report today to break corn and soybeans out of that tight trading range.Corn ratings with last night’s weekly crop progress report were unchanged at 61% good and excellent. Nine states, including Ohio, saw improvement while six states had corn rating declines. The U.S. soybean crop was rated at 60% good and excellent, compared to 61% last week. Ohio was unchanged at 56% good and excellent.Weather in South America is currently the tale of two extremes. Brazil is too dry while Argentina is to wet. The dry weather in Brazil will likely only improve the chances of seeing more winter corn planted there next May-June as producers skip the opportunity to plant corn early in the growing season.Actual combine reports in coming days and weeks will be the order of the day now that the monthly USDA report is behind us. Producers and traders alike will be most anxious to see harvest reports as many continue to think USDA was too high on their corn and soybean yield estimates detailed in August.Higher corn and soybean yields will leave many scratching their heads today.last_img read more

Enforcing a ban will not end the menace of stubble burning, say researchers

first_imgOnly educating farmers about the monetary costs of burning stubble can address the environmental crisis triggered every year in Punjab, says a team of Swiss and Indian researchers who interviewed 600 farmers over two years. Burning stubble, the rice chaff left over after harvesting, is linked to winter air-pollution in the State as well as down-wind DelhiAccording to the team, the government’s efforts — earmarking funds for specialised farming equipment (for straw management) or enforcing the state-led ban on the practice — are unlikely to solve the problem.Farmer cooperative groups — a key link between government and farmers — ought to be playing a more active role in educating farmers, say key authors associated with the study. Watch | Farmers continue to burn stubble despite ban Cheap solution“The main message is that farmers are not to blame (for the pollution crisis),” says Max Friedrich, a post-doctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag). “There are deeper causes beyond economic incentives or awareness about the health consequences of burning at play.”On average, about 20 million tonnes of straw are generated in Punjab, and they barely have two to three weeks to dispose them of and prepare the fields for the next crop. Hence the popularity of deploying stubble-burning as a quick and cheap solution.For about a decade now, the Delhi and the Centre have held this practice responsible for the abysmal air quality in the capital in winter.In 2013, the National Green Tribunal issued a directive to Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh asking them to ban such stubble burning. The environment ministers of these States as well as top officials at the Centre declared a “zero tolerance” policy on the burning of stubble, which has been estimated to contribute anywhere from 7% to 78% of the particulate matter-emission load in Delhi during winter.The Centre has spent about ₹600 crore in subsidising farm equipment via village cooperatives to enable farmers to access them and avoid stubble burning. In 2018, Punjab had disbursed about 8,000 farm implements to individual farmers and set up 4,795 custom hiring centres, from where such machinery could be leased. The cost of hiring these machines was about ₹5,000 an acre, as The Hindu has previously reported.Mixed resultsHowever, the success of these efforts has been mixed, even though stubble-fires in 2018 were fewer than in 2017 and 2016, according to satellite maps by independent researchers.In their interviews, the researchers found that farmers who had bigger landholdings were more likely to burn straw; those who used combine harvesters (for cutting the straw) as opposed to manual labourers were more likely to engage in burning; and those who burnt or didn’t burn were equally aware of the steps and procedures required to abstain from burning, said Dr. Friedrich. On average, the input costs of farmers who burned straw were about ₹40,000 per acre and those who didn’t about ₹25,000 per acre but the incomes of those who burned and those who didn’t were closer — about ₹60,000 and ₹50,000 respectively.“There needs to be greater participation by village cooperatives in being able to impose social norms that would dissuade burners,” said Banalata Sen, an independent public health professional, associated with the study, coordinated by Ranas Mosler (affiliated to Eawag), the Centre for Sustainable Agriculture (CSA), Hyderabad and Kethi Virasat Mission (KVM), Jaitu, India.center_img Farmers continue to burn stubble despite banVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:1501:15  last_img read more