SA celebrates with Obama

first_imgMillions of people around the world will watch the historic inauguration of president-elect Barack Obama.Khanyi Magubane As the United States comes to a standstill on 20 January to witness the inauguration of its 44th president Barack Obama, South Africa has planned its own series of celebrations.Dubbed one of the most prolific moments in American history, the inauguration of Obama, America’s first black president, has grabbed the attention of the world.The swearing-in of Obama as the nation’s 44th president on the west steps of the Capitol, Washington DC, at noon (7pm South African time) is expected to draw between one to three million spectators.  South African ambassador to America Welile Nhlapo will represent the country at the celebrations.No foreign delegations were invited to the inauguration and countries were informed beforehand that only those on ambassadorial level will be invited.Not to be left out though, a glitzy, formal inauguration ball will held at South Africa’s Monte Casino on 20 January, where a live satellite transmission of the events will be screened.Tickets to the now sold-out event were going at R1 000 (US$100) each.Renowned South African film producer Anant Singh is also in the process of filming a documentary around the ascension of Obama to the top seat.Singh was in America on election day in November 2008 when Obama was announced as the winner of the elections and declared the president-elect.At the moment all that is left for Singh is to capture the final footage of the historic inauguration.Currently, talks are in place with various South African and American TV networks to air the documentary soon after the swearing-in.The documentary includes an interviews with Obama himself, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and struggle stalwart Ahmed Kathrada, who hosted Obama in South Africa when he visited Robben Island.  Television stations in South Africa will broadcast the event.Party revellers will also be out in full swing as nightclubs in South Africa also host “inauguration parties”.A Cape Town based nightclub Roots Club will be hosting an Obama party in Observatory, where revellers have been encouraged come dressed up in an American theme.In Johannesburg, club goers will also be making their way to Sinabar. The popular nightclub will start the evening’s proceedings with a live broadcast of the swearing in.President Motlanthe’s message to ObamaAlthough not attending the event, President Kgalema Motlanthe has issued a congratulatory message to Obama.He hailed the profound place in history the event will always hold. “Your election to this high office of the American people, carries with it hope for millions of your country men and women as much as it is for millions of people of particularly of the African descent both in the continent of Africa as well as those in the Diaspora”.Motlanthe reiterated that Obama’s victory is Africa’s victory. “Accordingly, Africa which today stands proud of your achievements, can only but look forward to a fruitful working relationship with you both at a bilateral and multilateral levels in our endeavour to create a better world for all who live in it.“We express the hope that poverty and under-development in Africa which remains a challenge for humanity will indeed continue to receive a greater attention of the focus of the new administration,” said Motlanthe.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at khanyim@mediaclubsouthafrica.com Related articlesObamamania sweeps Africa Yes, we can Obama: African for White House? Useful linksDemocrats abroad South Africa Department of Foreign AffairsDemocratic Partylast_img read more

Cloud-Based Music Services Must Do More Than Sync or Store

first_imgTags:#Analysis#cloud Despite claims from sectors of the record industry that file-sharing kills creativity or that the Internet is dead, the digital music industry clearly has strong momentum right now, aided in no small part by cloud technologies that promise ubiquitous access to music. Both Apple and Google are poised to make an entry into cloud-based music services, joining the numerous other vendors already vying to provide us with music acquisition, sharing, and storage services.A new report from Forrester Research examines the ways in which the cloud will help enable what it describes as a “360 degree music experience” – not merely opening up the availability of our music across all of our various devices, but expanding the ways in which we experience our “record” collection. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market audrey watters Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The report’s author Mark Mulligan contends that the music industry’s business models and licensing rights issues have shaped the way in which digital music services have developed, creating a “highly splintered environment in which the consumer must navigate multiple technologies and applications throughout the four stages of the music experience journey”: discovery, acquisition, consumption and management.While 99-cent downloads might have helped move consumers away from the CD, the increasing availability of music online – not just for download, but for streaming – has changed our expectations of how and what we pay for music, but has also altered how we listen to it. The days of the living room Hi-Fi seem to be waning, replaced primarily by our PCs.In fact, despite the variety of new devices available to listen to music – phones, computers, MP3 players, gaming console systems – many consumers still store and listen to their digital music collections primarily on their PCs. 36% of those responding to a survey cited in the Forrester report say they listen to CDs and MP3s on their PC as their primary source of music-listening. 31% list their MP3 player as their primary device. Only 5% list their phone. Although some devices’ usage is really centered around small niche markets, these markets will be crucial, says Mulligan, as they are the consumers most likely to listen to music “on the go” and to want to stream music from their PCs. The challenge for new cloud-based music services, according to Mulligan, will be to “help digital music break free of the chains of the PC and the MP3 player” and to bring music-listening back into the living room. But Mulligan notes that closed ecosystems, lack of interoperability, competing industry standards, and proprietary rights issues all limit the potential reach of music services. And while the allure of the cloud is promising, Mulligan reminds digital music companies that they need to pay attention to how people want to experience their music, how they use (and don’t use, but may want to use) their various music devices. Most importantly, Mulligan says that any new cloud-based offerings should aim to provide a 360-degree music experience, one not only enabling storage and access via the cloud, but enabling discovery as well. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more