How impactful is Chiefs QB Pat Mahomes? Think Stephen Curry

first_imgPatrick Mahomes has made a splash, all right. Just past the midway point of his first season as a starter, the second-year quarterback of the Kansas City Chiefs is the NFL’s answer to Stephen Curry.Mahomes, who has the Chiefs at 8-1, is the leader in the clubhouse for the league’s Most Valuable Player. He is playing with combination of precision, creativity, instinct and the ability to strike from anywhere on on the field, whether it’s at the goal line or from long-distance. Sound familiar, …last_img read more

Social Innovator: Basil Kransdorff

first_imgFounder: e’PapWhy is Basil a Social Innovator?Industrial chemist by day and social entrepreneur by night, Basil Kransdorff has been hailed as a pioneer in food engineering. Basil is the founder of e’Pap, a pre-cooked maize meal that delivers the nutrients of a 10-course meal in a single portion.Not only is e’Pap full of nutrients, it was also formulated to improve the ability of the body to digest food. This is especially beneficial for HIV-positive or malnourished people.e’Pap is a super food that reaches the masses across Africa and has changed the lives of many undernourished or terminally ill people who could not otherwise afford essential food stuffs for themselves or their families.In his own words .“People often believe that products developed in Africa are inferior. We are very proud that we’ve created a state of the art product that we know is going to change the future road map of our continent.”Fast Factse’Pap started as a single project in the Johannesburg General Hospital eight years ago and is now distributed to 15 countries across Africa.Weight gains of between two and five kilograms are reported within five to 10 days of consuming e’Pap, while marked improvements in energy and concentration, sleep habits and skin condition have also been clinically observed.e’Pap is 29 times more nutritionally dense than refined maize and is packed with 28 micro and macro nutrients.Over the last eight years, over 42-million food portions of e’Pap has been delivered via community-based structures across the African continent.A single portion of e’Pap will cost between R1 and R2 a day.How can I help?To find out more about e’Pap and how you can contribute, send Basil an e-mail on basilb@iafrica.com.Story published on SAinfo on 27 June 2008.Source: Brand South Africalast_img read more

Universal healthcare for SA?

first_imgCommuters on their way home from workat the Noord Street taxi rank inJohannesburg. Under the National HealthInsurance system every South Africanwould have access to quality healthcareservices.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library.)MEDIA CONTACTS• Fidel HadebeMedia Liaison and Public InformationDepartment of HealthTel: +27 12 312 0663Mobile: +27 79 517 3333• Charity BhenguMinisterial Media LiaisonDepartment of HealthMobile: +27 79 087 2438• Ina van der LindeHSRC Media LiaisonTel: +27 82 331 0614• Allim Milazi Discovery Media RelationsTel: 27 11 529 2048USEFUL LINKS• ANC sticks to its guns on health plan – Mail & Guardian• Secret health plan raises temperatures – Business Times• ANC recommits to free education,universal healthcare – Polity.org.za• Department of Health• Human Sciences Research Council• Discovery HealthRELATED ARTICLESHealthcare in South AfricaBooster for child health in SAAn open solution to healthcareSouth Africa’s miracle health trainNew laws to cure health costsSamson MulugetaThe South African government is planning the rollout of universal health coverage in the country, in line with the Bill of Rights provision that “everyone has the right to have access to healthcare services, including reproductive healthcare”.The ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), first discussed the idea at its 52nd national conference in Polokwane, Limpopo province, in December 2007.There it called for the “implementation of a national health insurance (NHI) to further strengthen the public healthcare system and ensure adequate provision of funding”.The proposal received strong support among the ANC’s partners, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the South African Communist Party, and became one of the dominant themes of the party’s 2009 election campaign.After the ANC won the April elections with 65.9% of the vote, President Jacob Zuma formally announced the introduction of a countrywide health insurance scheme with plans to rehabilitate public hospitals through public-private partnerships.But the idea of a national health insurance scheme, particularly its cost, has sparked debate among all the parties involved, including private healthcare companies, healthcare workers, labour unions and politicians.At the moment in South Africa the private health sector spends about R66-billion (US$8.4-billion) to service about 7-million people, while the rest of the population depends on R59-billion ($7.5-billion) spent through the often stretched and under-resourced public health sector.FundingAt an estimated cost of R100-billion ($13-billion) a year, the NHI scheme would be compulsory for all South Africans to join. It would be funded by a levy or tax deducted from the salaries of those in the formal sector and by the state for the unemployed.Deputy Minister of Health Molefi Sefularo has said that “under the NHI every South African will benefit from quality healthcare services”.“The scheme will be funded partly by compulsory contributions by all persons who are earning an income – and partly by tax.“All these funds will be placed in a single pool. This pool will be available to fund all healthcare in the public and private sector.”A sector in crisisAn ANC task team led by Olive Shisana, head of the Human Sciences Research Council, has been working on the NHI proposal for more than a year. In an interview with Business Times on 5 June 2009 Shisana said the proposal was on track to be developed into a policy document and draft legislation.In addition to the principal problem of a healthcare system that does not adequately provide for the majority of the country’s citizens, the team has identified further issues plaguing the sector.These include deteriorating infrastructure, incompetency and inefficiency, inflated prices and excessive administrative expenses.“Services delivered based on need rather than on ability to pay” is the task team’s mandate.“To achieve a universal, comprehensive, free national healthcare system, founded on the primary healthcare approach, requires a well-funded and well resourced funded public health system,” Zwelinzima Vavi, Cosatu’s general secretary, told delegates at a South African Medical Association conference on 7 June 2009.“Apartheid had a fundamental impact on people’s health and the organisation of the health system in South Africa. That legacy, despite many achievements in our healthcare system, continues to this day.”Vavi added: “South Africa has enough resources to provide healthcare for everyone; what is required is the redistribution of these resources, from the minority of the population to the majority.”Dr Jonathan Broomberg, head of strategy and risk management at health insurer Discovery Health, said the NHI proposal is “a potentially a huge reform, and the government owes the people of this country and all stakeholders a serious and rigorous debate”.In an SAfm radio interview on 10 June 2009 Broomberg said he was worried that the private sector was seen as a problem instead of a big part of the solution.“I think what you see underneath this, which is also worrying, is the sense from some people that the private healthcare system is part of the problem, whereas in fact what this is, is an asset in this society.“You have world-class expertise in managing hospitals, great doctors and specialists, world-class pharmaceutical companies, world-class health fund managers and risk managers – and these are all assets that could be put to work in the public interest.”NHI criticismLike the ANC, the Democratic Alliance (DA), South Africa’s official opposition party, believes that “drastic improvement” is required to improve healthcare delivery – but the agreement ends there.“Reform of our health system must aim at correcting the failures in public health and spreading wider the successes in private health,” DA leader Helen Zille said in her weekly newsletter on 19 June 2009, published on the party’s website.“The DA takes a different approach based on the simple aim of finding the most just, efficient and economic system of providing every single South African with decent healthcare. We do not want revolutionary change. We just want to fix what is broken and to extend what is working well.“There could be a requirement that, in order to stay registered, private doctors would have to work a certain number of hours in the public sector each year,” the DA stated. “There could be more private wards in public hospitals, to the benefit of both sectors and their patients.”A critic of the planned NHI is Alex van den Heever, a health economist who has fought several battles over health system policy since 1994.In an interview with Business Times on 6 June 2009 he expressed grave misgivings over the lack of consultation in the early “research” phase of the plan.He also said the plan is “unworkable, unaffordable and uses the wrong institutional models”. He believes there will be a “backlash of unparalleled proportions”.In reaction to this criticism, ANC spokesperson Jesse Duarte said in a statement on 8 June 2009 that the party “has noted with concern media reports attempting to deflect public attention away from the crucial work of the NHI task team”.“We will transform healthcare in South Africa and will not be deterred by narrow interest groups and individuals bent on undermining the introduction of NHI before its work is made public,” she added.A draft bill on the NHI, which will combine the public and private health sectors, is expected in Parliament by December 2009.last_img read more

Ohio’s Crop Progress Report – August 17th, 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio growers experienced a week that was drier and slightly warmer than normal, according to the USDA, NASS, Great Lakes Regional Office. There were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending August 16th. Statewide soil moisture surpluses have declined, but crop condition ratings have stayed largely the same. Weed pressure is high where wet and soft ground hampered control efforts. Some growers noted improvements where recovery efforts were made, while others cited excessively dry conditions as a concern. Recorded rainfall ranged from 0 to 2.55 inches, with most districts seeing some precipitation. This was enough to keep shallow rooted crops going and the state clear of dry spots on the last U.S. Drought Monitor.View the complete report herelast_img read more

Seven coaches of Shaktipunj Express derail in Uttar Pradesh

first_imgSeven coaches of the Jabalpur-bound Shaktipunj Express derailed on Thursday in Sonbhadra district of Uttar Pradesh, a railway official said.“The accident occurred at around 6:25 am  and we have already cleared out the site,” railway ministry spokesperson Anil Saxena said.“All passengers were put on the remaining coaches and by 7:28 AM all of them had left the spot. All of them are safe and no one was injured in the accident,” he said.The train was running at a speed of about 40 km/hr which, officials say, prevented any injuries when the incident occurred.This is the third such derailment in the State in less than a month.On August 19, the Utkal Express had derailed in Muzaffarnagar district, killing 22 people and injuring 156.About 100 passengers were wounded when 10 coaches of Kaifiyat Express train derailed after crashing into a dumper which strayed on to the tracks in Auraiya district on August 23.last_img read more