Several roads are closed in the Peace region

first_imgCurrently, there are six main closures. The most significant is on Highway 97, 52 km west of Chetwynd, where the approaches to the Fisher Creek Bridge have been washed out, cutting highway access between Chetwynd and Mackenzie.- Advertisement -The South Taylor Hill is also down to single lane traffic because of the flooding.  You can still travel in the area, but expect delays.Ministry engineers are monitoring and assessing the site today to determine repair options and traffic will be re-established as soon as safe to do so. No local detour is available.The additional five main closures are as follows:Dawson Creek area:  * 94 Rd Dangerous Good Route  * 5 Landy Rd  * 22 Braden Rd.Chetwynd and area:  * 30 Rd Moberly Lake South  * 12 Rd JackfishAdvertisement Crews from the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and the maintenance contractors are working to restore access in these locations and to prevent additional closures in the region.A significant rainfall warning continues in the North and South Peace, with an additional 10 to 20 mm of rain expected today. Areas near the Pine Pass could potentially receive an additional 30 to 40 mm of rain today.Motorists are advised to check DriveBC for updated information on closures at www.drivebc.calast_img read more

What do fans and local people think about QPR’s plans for Old Oak?

first_imgQPR recently put their plans for a new stadium at Old Oak on display to the public. The club’s owners want to regenerate the land between Scrubs Lane and Willesden Junction, which would be known as New Queens Park and include a sporting and leisure hub at which Rangers would play.See also:QPR owners stay committed because their eyes are on the prizeQPR confirm Old Oak regeneration projectThe Old Oak project that would totally transform the face of QPROld Oak plan ‘speculative & presumptuous’The battle for Old Oak will be a huge opportunity for QPR fansQPR step up their pursuit of Old Oak site’More than 80%’ back QPR’s Old Oak plansRangers say public supports Old Oak plansFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Ramsey expects to work with Sherwood again

first_imgChris Ramsey believes he will end up working with Tim Sherwood again at some stage but hopes he isn’t reunited with him sooner rather than later.The pair worked together at Tottenham and Ramsey was brought to QPR as academy boss last year but with a view to eventually being first-team coach under Sherwood, who had been lined up to replace Harry Redknapp as manager at Loftus Road.But Rangers chairman Tony Fernandes became reluctant to appoint Sherwood and ended up installing Ramsey as head coach until the end of the season.Sherwood subsequently took over at Aston Villa and wants Ramsey to join him there next season if his friend is replaced by a new manager.And Ramsey admitted: “I could see us working together again, I just hope it’s not in the near future.”The pair will put their friendship to one side this evening at Villa Park, where a win would take second-from-bottom QPR above Sherwood’s team“It is going to be a bit of a strange feeling, but Tim’s the manager of another side and as soon as the ball starts to roll I’m going to block all that out,” Ramsey said.See also:Ramsey plays down Villa’s injury problemsQPR’s Yun ruled out of Aston Villa gameVargas’ season is ended by knee injuryAston Villa v QPR: five key battlesQPR defender Dunne returns to actionRangers defender Dunne returns to actionFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Universal healthcare for SA?

first_imgCommuters on their way home from workat the Noord Street taxi rank inJohannesburg. Under the National HealthInsurance system every South Africanwould have access to quality healthcareservices.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library.)MEDIA CONTACTS• Fidel HadebeMedia Liaison and Public InformationDepartment of HealthTel: +27 12 312 0663Mobile: +27 79 517 3333• Charity BhenguMinisterial Media LiaisonDepartment of HealthMobile: +27 79 087 2438• Ina van der LindeHSRC Media LiaisonTel: +27 82 331 0614• Allim Milazi Discovery Media RelationsTel: 27 11 529 2048USEFUL LINKS• ANC sticks to its guns on health plan – Mail & Guardian• Secret health plan raises temperatures – Business Times• ANC recommits to free education,universal healthcare – Polity.org.za• Department of Health• Human Sciences Research Council• Discovery HealthRELATED ARTICLESHealthcare in South AfricaBooster for child health in SAAn open solution to healthcareSouth Africa’s miracle health trainNew laws to cure health costsSamson MulugetaThe South African government is planning the rollout of universal health coverage in the country, in line with the Bill of Rights provision that “everyone has the right to have access to healthcare services, including reproductive healthcare”.The ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), first discussed the idea at its 52nd national conference in Polokwane, Limpopo province, in December 2007.There it called for the “implementation of a national health insurance (NHI) to further strengthen the public healthcare system and ensure adequate provision of funding”.The proposal received strong support among the ANC’s partners, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the South African Communist Party, and became one of the dominant themes of the party’s 2009 election campaign.After the ANC won the April elections with 65.9% of the vote, President Jacob Zuma formally announced the introduction of a countrywide health insurance scheme with plans to rehabilitate public hospitals through public-private partnerships.But the idea of a national health insurance scheme, particularly its cost, has sparked debate among all the parties involved, including private healthcare companies, healthcare workers, labour unions and politicians.At the moment in South Africa the private health sector spends about R66-billion (US$8.4-billion) to service about 7-million people, while the rest of the population depends on R59-billion ($7.5-billion) spent through the often stretched and under-resourced public health sector.FundingAt an estimated cost of R100-billion ($13-billion) a year, the NHI scheme would be compulsory for all South Africans to join. It would be funded by a levy or tax deducted from the salaries of those in the formal sector and by the state for the unemployed.Deputy Minister of Health Molefi Sefularo has said that “under the NHI every South African will benefit from quality healthcare services”.“The scheme will be funded partly by compulsory contributions by all persons who are earning an income – and partly by tax.“All these funds will be placed in a single pool. This pool will be available to fund all healthcare in the public and private sector.”A sector in crisisAn ANC task team led by Olive Shisana, head of the Human Sciences Research Council, has been working on the NHI proposal for more than a year. In an interview with Business Times on 5 June 2009 Shisana said the proposal was on track to be developed into a policy document and draft legislation.In addition to the principal problem of a healthcare system that does not adequately provide for the majority of the country’s citizens, the team has identified further issues plaguing the sector.These include deteriorating infrastructure, incompetency and inefficiency, inflated prices and excessive administrative expenses.“Services delivered based on need rather than on ability to pay” is the task team’s mandate.“To achieve a universal, comprehensive, free national healthcare system, founded on the primary healthcare approach, requires a well-funded and well resourced funded public health system,” Zwelinzima Vavi, Cosatu’s general secretary, told delegates at a South African Medical Association conference on 7 June 2009.“Apartheid had a fundamental impact on people’s health and the organisation of the health system in South Africa. That legacy, despite many achievements in our healthcare system, continues to this day.”Vavi added: “South Africa has enough resources to provide healthcare for everyone; what is required is the redistribution of these resources, from the minority of the population to the majority.”Dr Jonathan Broomberg, head of strategy and risk management at health insurer Discovery Health, said the NHI proposal is “a potentially a huge reform, and the government owes the people of this country and all stakeholders a serious and rigorous debate”.In an SAfm radio interview on 10 June 2009 Broomberg said he was worried that the private sector was seen as a problem instead of a big part of the solution.“I think what you see underneath this, which is also worrying, is the sense from some people that the private healthcare system is part of the problem, whereas in fact what this is, is an asset in this society.“You have world-class expertise in managing hospitals, great doctors and specialists, world-class pharmaceutical companies, world-class health fund managers and risk managers – and these are all assets that could be put to work in the public interest.”NHI criticismLike the ANC, the Democratic Alliance (DA), South Africa’s official opposition party, believes that “drastic improvement” is required to improve healthcare delivery – but the agreement ends there.“Reform of our health system must aim at correcting the failures in public health and spreading wider the successes in private health,” DA leader Helen Zille said in her weekly newsletter on 19 June 2009, published on the party’s website.“The DA takes a different approach based on the simple aim of finding the most just, efficient and economic system of providing every single South African with decent healthcare. We do not want revolutionary change. We just want to fix what is broken and to extend what is working well.“There could be a requirement that, in order to stay registered, private doctors would have to work a certain number of hours in the public sector each year,” the DA stated. “There could be more private wards in public hospitals, to the benefit of both sectors and their patients.”A critic of the planned NHI is Alex van den Heever, a health economist who has fought several battles over health system policy since 1994.In an interview with Business Times on 6 June 2009 he expressed grave misgivings over the lack of consultation in the early “research” phase of the plan.He also said the plan is “unworkable, unaffordable and uses the wrong institutional models”. He believes there will be a “backlash of unparalleled proportions”.In reaction to this criticism, ANC spokesperson Jesse Duarte said in a statement on 8 June 2009 that the party “has noted with concern media reports attempting to deflect public attention away from the crucial work of the NHI task team”.“We will transform healthcare in South Africa and will not be deterred by narrow interest groups and individuals bent on undermining the introduction of NHI before its work is made public,” she added.A draft bill on the NHI, which will combine the public and private health sectors, is expected in Parliament by December 2009.last_img read more

Scrapie submissions needed

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The good news for American sheep producers is that the industry has scrapie on the run. The bad news is that the current status makes carriers of the fatal disease more difficult to find.“The incidence rate is now very low and finding the few remaining cases becomes more difficult using traditional surveillance methods,” said Wyoming State Veterinarian Jim Logan, DVM. “The best and most appropriate method now is within flock surveillance. It is in the best interest of the industry that we sample as many adult dead sheep and goats that we can find and get them tested.”The only diagnostic tests currently available to determine if a sheep has scrapie require brain or lymphoid tissue. Scrapie is typically diagnosed by finding abnormal prion protein accumulation in the brain and/or lymphoid tissue of infected sheep. A positive test must be confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories. While no new cases of classical scrapie have been reported in the United States since April 2016, there’s still a need to be vigilant.“If producers take this on in a serious manner and get heads to the laboratory, it will help the U.S. Department of Agriculture prove to the international community that the United States is free of scrapie, and we will finally be able to wrap up this national eradication program,” Logan said.The best way for producers to assist in completely eradicating scrapie from American borders is to participate in APHIS’ sample submission program. The program is provided at no cost to the producer, and asks that producers submit samples from adult sheep or goats.“Most producers don’t see scrapie as an issue in their flock,” said Diane Sutton, USDA/APHIS Veterinary Services Sheep and Goat Health Team Leader. “We’re so close to being free of scrapie, but we need to be able to demonstrate that to the world. Slaughter surveillance alone won’t get the job done.”The process for submitting samples is fairly simple. Shipping boxes with packing supplies and shipping are provided at no cost by APHIS. For more information, visit http://Sheepusa.org/IssuesPrograms_AnimalHealth_Scrapie.last_img read more

NPR’s Andy Carvin Shows How to Retweet Globally (Map)

first_imgThere’s no better way to see Tweets about the Middle East than by following NPR Senior Strategist Andy Carvin. He’s curating, verifying when possible and reporting on Tweets from and about the contentious region day and night. How diverse are the Tweets Carvin is curating? We used the handy web app Needlebase to scrape, analyze and map the Twitter community Carvin is bringing into the streams of his own community of followers and found some interesting data points. He’s retweeted 186 distinct Twitter accounts over the last four days alone. 56% of the accounts Carvin has shared content from have listed recognizable locations on their Twitter profiles. 44% have undisclosed or unclear locations, no doubt in some cases for reasons of personal safety. A healthy 40% of those who have listed locations are located in the Middle East!Only 15% of the people Retweeted are from the United States.Eight are from Libya, though several of those are satirical accounts.Many more levels and types of analysis are possible and of course locations aren’t verified. But for now it’s nice to know that the people watching Andy Carvin’s Tweet stream (I sure am) are getting a diverse stream of messages with a solid percentage of those sources coming from the region in question. Thanks for all you do, Andy!Below: As Carvin adds value on Twitter, his own community grows. Tags:#international#twitter#web marshall kirkpatrick A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more

Gujarat BJP leaders fight over location of AIIMS

first_imgThe Union government is yet to announce the setting up of a world-class All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s home State Gujarat, but some State Bharatiya Janata Party leaders are already fighting over its location.Gujarat BJP leaders and legislators from Rajkot and Vadodara have been fighting over the venue of the facility, which is likely to be set up in the State. Recently, Gujarat State BJP president Jitu Vaghani said in Rajkot that the AIIMS would be set up in Rajkot to cater to the healthcare needs of the people of the Saurashtra region.Mr. Vaghani said this while campaigning for the recently held by-election for the Jasdan Assembly constituency in Rajkot district. Mr. Vaghani’s impromptu announcement caught even State Ministers off guard. Deputy Chief Minister and Health Minister Nitin Patel feigned ignorance over an AIIMS in Rajkot.“I am not aware of any development regarding the AIIMS in Rajkot,” Mr. Patel reportedly said. Legislators meet CMSubsequently, a group of eight legislators from the Vadodara district called on Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani in an attempt to persuade him to select Vadodara as the venue for AIIMS.“We want AIIMS in Vadodara as was promised earlier. Now, they cannot change the location and pick up Rajkot,” said the party’s veteran legislator Yogesh Patel, who led the delegation of legislators from central Gujarat to the Chief Minister.According to Mr. Patel, there are tribal pockets like Chhota Udepur, Narmada, Godhara and Dahod near Vadodara, so a world class medical institute can cater to them, too, besides Vadodara city. Another legislator who was part of the delegation said that the CM himself was not sure whether Rajkot was being picked as the location for the AIIMS, as was suggested by the State party chief.last_img read more