Edwin Colodny receives Champlain College award

first_imgEdwin Colodny was awarded the 2004 Champlain College Distinguished Citizen Award during the college’s 126th Commencement Ceremony. Each year the College singles out an individual from the community who displays exceptional personal and professional achievement, a strong record of community service, and dynamic leadership. In his remarks at Commencement, the chairman of Champlain’s board of trustees, William G. Post, Jr., described Colodny as a humble leader who has been a vital force in the economic, intellectual and artistic life of the area over the course of six decades.The Burlington native was president, CEO, and chairman of the board of US Airways, and chairman of the board of Comcast Corporation. He was on counsel in a high-powered Washington law firm and he was a sought-after corporate board member.He returned to Burlington three years ago to guide the University of Vermont through its fourth presidential transition in seven years. Colodny drove key initiatives forward aggressively and left the school a stronger place for his successor.After leaving UVM and retiring yet again, Colodny almost immediately stepped into another executive role, serving as interim CEO at Fletcher Allen Health Care during a challenging year in the history of the state’s largest hospital. Colodny serves on the boards of the Vermont Law School, Vermont Symphony, Vermont Mozart Festival, Shelburne Museum, and the New England Culinary Institute. He’s a member of the Rotary Club and he’s chairing the steering committee for Governor Douglas’s Clean and Clear Water Action Plan.“He’s just a guy who can’t say no,” says David Coates, who has worked with Colodny on a number of boards. “He has the ability to ask the right questions and in a way that’s not intimidating. As a result, he gets the right answer. And he has an amazing ability to analyze a very complicated matter and bring it down to a level that everyone can understand.”Theresa Albergini DiPalma, a friend and colleague at Fletcher Allen, says, “Ed’s a people person at the core of it all. He understands that so much in life is about relationships. He’s somebody who always has time to stop and talk.”Colodny’s love of the arts, reverence for education and affection for his hometown are essential parts of who is, Post noted. “That infuses his work with a special kind of energy and enthusiasm, and we, as a community, are fortunate to benefit from it.”last_img read more

3 tips to build consumer trust on data security

first_imgThis is placeholder text continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr In 2019, over 800 reported breaches impacted nearly 500 million accounts according to the Identity Theft Resource Center. In the first half of 2020 there have been 540 reported breaches impacting an estimated 160 million accounts. Consumers are distressingly familiar with data breach headlines and the potential for their personal information to be compromised, even as demand continues to grow for enhanced digital, online services. COVID-19 has only accelerated this digital adoption.BAI’s Banking Outlook reports that 83% of financial service organizations feel an increased sense of urgency to implement digital initiatives. COVID-19 has only served to increase this pressure as digital use increased at the onset of the pandemic in March and April. However, with an increase in digital banking, there’s heightened security concerns, including fraud attempts, technology failures, and user errors. According to 2020 BAI research, 38% of consumers across all generations report that their biggest frustration with digital banking remains the fear of fraud and security concerns.Trust is a critical component financial institutions need in order to provide a user experience that is secure, responsive, and easy to use. As more services move online, there are some practices institutions can put in place to help build consumer trust, while also putting practical, preventative protocols in place to help keep user data secure.center_img This post is currently collecting data…last_img read more

The Slippery Slope of Euthanasia in Belgium

first_imgDaily Mail 20 June 2019Family First Comment: Three children are among thousands of people to have died under Belgium’s radical euthanasia regime. They were euthanised under the world’s only law that allows children of any age to choose to be put to death. An official report has revealed the annual number of euthanasia cases across all age groups has multiplied almost fivefold in ten years.#rejectassistedsuicideprotect.org.nzLast year, figures revealed that three children are among thousands of people to have died under Belgium’s radical euthanasia regimeThey were euthanised under the world’s only law that allows children of any age to choose to be put to death – a move opponents warn trivialises the value of life.An official report has revealed the annual number of euthanasia cases across all age groups has multiplied almost fivefold in ten years. The practice was legalised in Belgium in 2003 – a year after the Netherlands. In 2007, 495 Belgians chose to die this way.But latest figures reveal there were 2,028 such deaths in the country in 2016 and 2,309 in 2017 – a 14 per cent year-on-year rise. Two of the children died in 2016 and one in 2017. Their names and ages were not given, but all were understood to have had cancer.While the Netherlands does not allow children under 12 to choose death, Belgium’s decision in 2014 to extend its euthanasia laws to all minors provoked outrage in the country and internationally.READ MORE: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7158031/Belgian-doctor-practices-euthanasia-says-doesnt-feel-like-hes-killing-patient.html?ito=email_share_article-factboxlast_img read more

November 14, 2018 Police Blotter

first_imgNovember 14, 2018 Police Blotter111418 Decatur County Jail Report111418 Decatur County Law Report111418 Decatur County EMS Report111418 Decatur County Fire Report111418 Batesville Police Blotterlast_img