Delighted Tsonga wins World Tennis title

first_imgROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP): Jo-Wilfried Tsonga clinched his 13th career title yesterday, rallying from a set down to beat David Goffin of Belgium 4-6, 6-4, 6-1 in the final of the World Tennis Tournament. The sixth-seeded Frenchman hit 10 aces and, although he dropped his serve twice, he broke the third-seeded Goffin’s serve four times. Tsonga, ranked 14, lost the final here in Rotterdam six years ago. His previous title also came on indoor hard courts in Metz, France, two years ago. “I’m really happy. The last couple of months, I put in a lot of effort to come back to this level,” Tsonga said. “It’s a huge reward for me and it gives me new expectations for the rest of the year.” The powerful Tsonga changed his approach to play more to his strengths and dictate points more. “I changed my serve and worked a lot on my backhand and my returns. I also changed my strings. There were many things to improve my game,” he said. “In the second set, I showed a different mentality on court. I was more aggressive and it made the difference.” He improved to 4-2 overall in career meetings against the 11th-ranked Goffin, who won both of his career titles in 2014. The 31-year-old Tsonga reached the milestone of 400 career wins this week, and victory in the final was his 401st. Goffin, meanwhile, will become the first Belgian man to break into the top 10 when the rankings are published on Monday. “I was a bit tired. I started the final really well, but in the end Jo played better than me,” the 26-year-old Goffin said. “Of course I’m disappointed, but I played some good tennis.”last_img read more

ADHD drugs may be cause of thousands of trips to ER

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2The issue was discussed in a series of letters in today’s New England Journal of Medicine, including some from doctors worried about the dangers of not treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. “The numbers (of side effects) are puny compared to the numbers of stimulant prescriptions per year,” said Dr. Tolga Taneli, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark. An estimated 5 million Americans are taking ADHD medicines. Accidental overdoses and side effects from attention deficit drugs likely send thousands of children and adults to emergency rooms, according to the first national estimates of the problem. Scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated problems with the stimulant drugs drive nearly 3,100 people to ERs each year. Nearly two-thirds – overdoses and accidental use – could be prevented by parents locking the pills away, the researchers say. Other patients had side effects, including potential cardiac problems such as chest pain, stroke, high blood pressure and fast heart rate. Concerns over those effects have led some doctors to urge the Food and Drug Administration to require a “black box,” its most serious warning, on package inserts for drugs such as Ritalin, Concerta and Adderall. Yet even doctors advising the FDA don’t agree on whether that’s warranted. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more