How impactful is Chiefs QB Pat Mahomes? Think Stephen Curry

first_imgPatrick Mahomes has made a splash, all right. Just past the midway point of his first season as a starter, the second-year quarterback of the Kansas City Chiefs is the NFL’s answer to Stephen Curry.Mahomes, who has the Chiefs at 8-1, is the leader in the clubhouse for the league’s Most Valuable Player. He is playing with combination of precision, creativity, instinct and the ability to strike from anywhere on on the field, whether it’s at the goal line or from long-distance. Sound familiar, …last_img read more

Universal healthcare for SA?

first_imgCommuters on their way home from workat the Noord Street taxi rank inJohannesburg. Under the National HealthInsurance system every South Africanwould have access to quality healthcareservices.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library.)MEDIA CONTACTS• Fidel HadebeMedia Liaison and Public InformationDepartment of HealthTel: +27 12 312 0663Mobile: +27 79 517 3333• Charity BhenguMinisterial Media LiaisonDepartment of HealthMobile: +27 79 087 2438• Ina van der LindeHSRC Media LiaisonTel: +27 82 331 0614• Allim Milazi Discovery Media RelationsTel: 27 11 529 2048USEFUL LINKS• ANC sticks to its guns on health plan – Mail & Guardian• Secret health plan raises temperatures – Business Times• ANC recommits to free education,universal healthcare – Polity.org.za• Department of Health• Human Sciences Research Council• Discovery HealthRELATED ARTICLESHealthcare in South AfricaBooster for child health in SAAn open solution to healthcareSouth Africa’s miracle health trainNew laws to cure health costsSamson MulugetaThe South African government is planning the rollout of universal health coverage in the country, in line with the Bill of Rights provision that “everyone has the right to have access to healthcare services, including reproductive healthcare”.The ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC), first discussed the idea at its 52nd national conference in Polokwane, Limpopo province, in December 2007.There it called for the “implementation of a national health insurance (NHI) to further strengthen the public healthcare system and ensure adequate provision of funding”.The proposal received strong support among the ANC’s partners, the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) and the South African Communist Party, and became one of the dominant themes of the party’s 2009 election campaign.After the ANC won the April elections with 65.9% of the vote, President Jacob Zuma formally announced the introduction of a countrywide health insurance scheme with plans to rehabilitate public hospitals through public-private partnerships.But the idea of a national health insurance scheme, particularly its cost, has sparked debate among all the parties involved, including private healthcare companies, healthcare workers, labour unions and politicians.At the moment in South Africa the private health sector spends about R66-billion (US$8.4-billion) to service about 7-million people, while the rest of the population depends on R59-billion ($7.5-billion) spent through the often stretched and under-resourced public health sector.FundingAt an estimated cost of R100-billion ($13-billion) a year, the NHI scheme would be compulsory for all South Africans to join. It would be funded by a levy or tax deducted from the salaries of those in the formal sector and by the state for the unemployed.Deputy Minister of Health Molefi Sefularo has said that “under the NHI every South African will benefit from quality healthcare services”.“The scheme will be funded partly by compulsory contributions by all persons who are earning an income – and partly by tax.“All these funds will be placed in a single pool. This pool will be available to fund all healthcare in the public and private sector.”A sector in crisisAn ANC task team led by Olive Shisana, head of the Human Sciences Research Council, has been working on the NHI proposal for more than a year. In an interview with Business Times on 5 June 2009 Shisana said the proposal was on track to be developed into a policy document and draft legislation.In addition to the principal problem of a healthcare system that does not adequately provide for the majority of the country’s citizens, the team has identified further issues plaguing the sector.These include deteriorating infrastructure, incompetency and inefficiency, inflated prices and excessive administrative expenses.“Services delivered based on need rather than on ability to pay” is the task team’s mandate.“To achieve a universal, comprehensive, free national healthcare system, founded on the primary healthcare approach, requires a well-funded and well resourced funded public health system,” Zwelinzima Vavi, Cosatu’s general secretary, told delegates at a South African Medical Association conference on 7 June 2009.“Apartheid had a fundamental impact on people’s health and the organisation of the health system in South Africa. That legacy, despite many achievements in our healthcare system, continues to this day.”Vavi added: “South Africa has enough resources to provide healthcare for everyone; what is required is the redistribution of these resources, from the minority of the population to the majority.”Dr Jonathan Broomberg, head of strategy and risk management at health insurer Discovery Health, said the NHI proposal is “a potentially a huge reform, and the government owes the people of this country and all stakeholders a serious and rigorous debate”.In an SAfm radio interview on 10 June 2009 Broomberg said he was worried that the private sector was seen as a problem instead of a big part of the solution.“I think what you see underneath this, which is also worrying, is the sense from some people that the private healthcare system is part of the problem, whereas in fact what this is, is an asset in this society.“You have world-class expertise in managing hospitals, great doctors and specialists, world-class pharmaceutical companies, world-class health fund managers and risk managers – and these are all assets that could be put to work in the public interest.”NHI criticismLike the ANC, the Democratic Alliance (DA), South Africa’s official opposition party, believes that “drastic improvement” is required to improve healthcare delivery – but the agreement ends there.“Reform of our health system must aim at correcting the failures in public health and spreading wider the successes in private health,” DA leader Helen Zille said in her weekly newsletter on 19 June 2009, published on the party’s website.“The DA takes a different approach based on the simple aim of finding the most just, efficient and economic system of providing every single South African with decent healthcare. We do not want revolutionary change. We just want to fix what is broken and to extend what is working well.“There could be a requirement that, in order to stay registered, private doctors would have to work a certain number of hours in the public sector each year,” the DA stated. “There could be more private wards in public hospitals, to the benefit of both sectors and their patients.”A critic of the planned NHI is Alex van den Heever, a health economist who has fought several battles over health system policy since 1994.In an interview with Business Times on 6 June 2009 he expressed grave misgivings over the lack of consultation in the early “research” phase of the plan.He also said the plan is “unworkable, unaffordable and uses the wrong institutional models”. He believes there will be a “backlash of unparalleled proportions”.In reaction to this criticism, ANC spokesperson Jesse Duarte said in a statement on 8 June 2009 that the party “has noted with concern media reports attempting to deflect public attention away from the crucial work of the NHI task team”.“We will transform healthcare in South Africa and will not be deterred by narrow interest groups and individuals bent on undermining the introduction of NHI before its work is made public,” she added.A draft bill on the NHI, which will combine the public and private health sectors, is expected in Parliament by December 2009.last_img read more

Jessica Sandral

first_imgJess’ passion for travel is only matched by her love of all things digital. She is at home backpacking through India or discussing the vagaries of the world of IT.Contact:Airline Ratings PTY Ltd.Newspaper House, 50 Hasler Rd.Osborne Park, 6017Western AustraliaPhone: +61 41 7936610Email:jessica.sandral@airlineratings.comlast_img

Commodity Classic focuses on farmer profitability

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest More than 350 Ohioans joined nearly 10,000 farmers from around the country for the 2017 Commodity Classic in San Antonio early this month to set policy, network and learn to improve their farms from some of the nation’s top experts.“The theme of the conference has really been farmer profitability. The last three years we have seen decreasing net incomes because of prices and that is a big concern,” said Keith Truckor, chair of the Ohio Corn Checkoff Board and Fulton County farmer. “Fortunately we had a good run of profitability so we are coming in with pretty strong balance sheets, which is a positive. As we look forward in the next year or two there are concerns about where profitability will be. With that in mind we are looking at trade and biofuels and farm bill policy to make sure we are on the forefront of turning this cycle back to stronger profitability for farmers in the United States. President Trump was carried by rural America and we want to make sure that he is aware of the fact that he made some promises during his campaign and we want to hold him to those promises.”Trade is at the top of the list of political concerns.“The ag world is very concerned about what is happening with trade. It is a major portion of the agricultural industry and Mr. Trump has not been very friendly to it at this time. I think things are going to work, though. His major concern is with the industrial portion of trade rather than the ag portion of it,” said Jerry Bambauer, American Soybean Association Board of Directors member, from Auglaize County. “He’s cancelled the Trans Pacific Partnership. We really didn’t have it implemented yet but we did have a lot of work done on it. He would like to go to bi-lateral rather than multi-lateral trade agreements. Bi-laterals can take a long time and our biggest challenge may be how long it takes to implement them.”Even if the Trump Administration does successfully navigate successful bi-lateral trade deals, the time spent prior to their implementation could mean big losses for agriculture.“If we have a trade agreement with a country we typically supply around 20% to almost 60% of the agricultural trade going into that country. In the countries where we have no trade agreements, we are down around 9%,” Bambauer said. “Trade agreements definitely have a major effect on our ability to export our products into other countries. And, we have a lot of non-GM food grade soybeans grown in Ohio. If we mess this up those arrangements could still happen, but not as much as it does now and it is a pretty good income source for a number of our farmers.”This concern is shared with the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, according to president Jed Bower from Fayette County.“We thought we had some pretty decent trade deals, but looking forward we have to be positive,” Bower said. “This president did write ‘The Art of the Deal’ and we have to give him a chance to see what he can do and keep in positive conversation with him to be at the table the whole time.”On the positive side, the Trump Administration has aggressively addressed the regulatory environment at the federal level, said Tadd Nicholson, executive director of the OCWGA.“Trump has been focused on addressing the regulations throughout his campaign and the early days of his administration. We are nervous about some of the things he has done on trade but we are very optimistic about some of these other things,” Nicholson said. “We take the good with the bad. The action on the Waters of the U.S. was a key move that we needed to have happen and that got done early on. We are only six weeks into his administration and that is a great signal to us that we have someone we will be able to work with in the EPA.”Of course, ethanol was a hot topic at the Commodity Classic.“Any time a bunch of corn farmers get together, you are talking about ethanol because it has been such a mainstay. We have seen domestic ramp up of ethanol production and usage and now we are seeing more exporting of ethanol. If you can use corn to make it, we are interested in exporting it,” Nicholson said. “There have been some complicated things about ethanol in the news lately like points of obligation and the intricate details of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). We are about promoting the RFS, we defend it, we like it how it is. We would oppose anything that would hurt the RFS. There is nothing out there in writing that we can look at and we really don’t know what deals have been made. We do want to pay a whole lot of attention to this because there are opportunities, maybe, within the new administration. We want to get to know the Trump team the best we can to take advantage of every opportunity for Ohio’s corn farmers.“There was obviously a little angst in the ag community when he was making some of his initial appointments and their backgrounds. I have a lot of optimism at this point, though. The President just reaffirmed through a letter his support for the RFS and ethanol and renewable fuels in general. His team may have their history in the oil industry but this president has been pro ethanol.”There was also plenty of talk about the farm bill, Bower said.“As we are moving forward with the farm bill we have been talking about the importance of crop insurance, the title programs, how the PLC and ARC are working, and we did our listening sessions back home and brought that to the national level,” Bower said. “There are some discrepancies from state to state but a tremendous amount of common ground.”Those attending the general session at the Commodity Classic got a farm bill update first hand from U.S. House Ag Chairman Mike Conaway (R-Texas).“I’m driven to get the farm bill done on time for the good of farmers, consumers and the country,” he said. “If you want the drama of delays, short-term extensions or going back to the old law, then I’d suggest you go to another theatre or meeting hall. We’re going to get this thing done and on time. We have to so we can bring certainty to the industry for farmers and bankers and lenders so they can plan and get about the business of farming and growingThose attending the general session at the Commodity Classic got a farm bill update first hand from U.S. House Ag Chairman Mike Conaway (R-Texas).food.”Conaway also said that the White House is very supportive of a timely farm bill and that he will be working to tweak some of the concerns with the previous farm bill, including the dairy programs and reworking the Agricultural Risk Coverage plan to be a stronger safety net. He said nutrition program will be a part of the next farm bill and direct payments would not. The farm bill debate is expected to really pick up this summer.Water quality was also a topic, as other states are watching what is happening in Ohio.“Water quality is still right at the top of our priority list in Ohio and people are really watching to see how we have worked with our legislature and how some of the laws were formed,” said Todd Hesterman, Ohio Soybean Association president. “Others are trying to be proactive in their states as well and we areAs usual, the large trade show was a big attraction at the 2017 Commodity Classic.setting a pretty good example for them to follow.”Along with setting policy and discussing the issues, the annual meeting of the National Corn Growers Association, American Soybean Association and National Association of Wheat Growers also featured a full array of PAC auctions, networking opportunities and a massive trade show that gave attendees plenty to stay busy. The beautiful San Antonio weather sure didn’t hurt either.last_img read more

My favorite Farm Science Review memory

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Joel PenhorwoodMy favorite FSR memory beings with the doldrums of school that start in September.Pretty much one thing kept my attention — that special day when Dad would keep me home and instead of going to school, we would head to Farm Science Review.We got up early (which never seemed to be a problem on this day in particular, though every other was a struggle) and headed to London. We made sure to leave enough time to stop at the same restaurant every year, the now-defunct Amish Kitchen, a Der Dutchman style restaurant where we would have the breakfast buffet. For some reason, it always tasted better than any other breakfast I had.We sat in the same area by the same fireplace and had the same conversation — things we were looking forward to seeing during the day ahead.I always preferred seeing all the exhibits and ending up lugging around about 50 pounds worth of freebies by the time the day was through. Dad liked to for us to venture out to the field demonstrations and to check out the Gwynne Conservation Area. Now that I’m older, those field demos and the Gwynne have grown on me. It’s nice to walk around there, even today, thinking of my time with Dad at the Review.Dad has always spent quite a bit of time with my two older brothers and I. As the youngest though, it wasn’t always the easiest thing to find one-on-one time. Farm Science Review was that special day. It was just Dad and me doing something together.He sat there with me in the Small Farms Center when I was hoping to learn more about raising chickens or trying to get a hobby farm intro. Encouragement wasn’t hard to find.And every few years, Mom would tag along as well to make it an extra special day.Then maybe, (most likely!), we would stop by Der Dutchman on the way home.Thanks Dad for taking off that day of work every year and busting me out of school to spend quality time together. You’ll never know how much it meant to me.Farm Science Review will always be riddled with fond memories for my family. What are yours? As Farm Science Review comes to a close for another year, we encourage you to share your favorite Farm Science Review memories on social media with #FSR18. Maybe you made a new favorite memory this year? Maybe it was your first year coming? Tell us! Do it by the end of the day on Friday and you’ll be entered into a drawing for a YETI cooler, valued at $200.last_img read more

Råbjerg Mile – GC21787 – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 25, 2012

first_imgShare with your Friends:More Jumping into soft sandEver wonder what would it be like if the ground literally started to move under your feet? Geocachers who visited the Råbjerg Mile (GC21787) EarthCache know exactly what it’s like.Located at the northern tip of Denmark, between the Danish cities of Skagen and Frederikshavn, the Råbjerg Mile is the largest migrating sand dune in Northern Europe. It contains millions of cubic meters of sand and moves up to 18 meters (59 feet) every year. Geocachers can enjoy this migrating wonder and observe many types of birds that make it their travelling home by visiting the difficulty 1.5, terrain 2 EarthCache.Denmark once had many shifting dunes, even larger than the Råbjerg Mile. These dunes caused many problems for the people living in their paths. So, in the mid-19th century, the state bought the land under the dunes so that it could plant dune grasses and conifers that would help stabilize it. They then left the Råbjerg Mile so that future generations would remember both the challenges and the beauty of these shifting sand dunes.Marking sand angelsMichael, a.k.a. WAUZZZ4B has given fellow Premium Member geocachers yet another reason to see and experience nature at its best since creating the EarthCache in November of 2009.Geocachers everywhere can learn a lot about this dune just by reading the detailed cache page. But nearly 450 Premium Members got to experience this EarthCache for what it’s worth and share their experiences by posting more than 530 breathtaking images.With Geocaching.com’s request, Michael has agreed to temporarily grant access to basic members for an opportunity to experience and log this EarthCache.One geocacher who logged this Premium Cache wrote, “We heard about the dune from some friends who visited many years ago. We decided that we wanted to check out this place during our visit to Denmark. Sure enough, there’s an EarthCache, which gave us even more reason to come out and log our visit. We didn’t realize how beautiful this place is. Absolutely stunning scenery and by far the biggest sand box we’ve ever been in!”For more information on Geocaching Premium features, such as Premium Caches, visit Geocaching.com/Premium.Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com.Soft sand between toes. SharePrint RelatedNamib Desert, Namibia (GC14W63) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 8, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”Bruneau Sand Dunes GC10F12 GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – October 31, 2011October 31, 2011In “Community”Geocaching country souvenir: NamibiaDecember 8, 2017In “Community”last_img read more

OutBound Conference – Atlanta 2017

first_imgA few years ago, while I was sitting in a sales kickoff meeting and waiting to speak, I was struck with an idea. I looked around the room, and saw 500 people enjoying great speakers and excellent content. That is a lot of salespeople, but I couldn’t help but think about all the salespeople who had never been to a sales kickoff meeting.At that point, I went to the web and bought virtualsaleskickoff.com. I called the people in my mastermind group, and we scheduled the first VSK. Over 2,500 people attended that first VSK in 2015. In 2016, 5,400 people attended, and over 10,000 watched that year’s kickoff. This year, 7,400 people signed up, and I have no idea how many attended.Around the middle of last year, I had another idea. There are all kinds of conferences, but there isn’t one on outbound prospecting, which is still the fastest way to create new opportunities. I called Jeb Blount and pitched him. He was difficult to restrain, calling it “genius.” I called Mike Weinberg and Mark Hunter, both of whom agreed that it was not only a good idea, but “necessary.”All of us agree that too little attention is being paid to prospecting and pipelines. There is too much waiting, and salespeople need more help creating opportunities. So, OutBound was born.The very first OutBound Conference is being held at the Intercontinental Hotel in Buckhead, Atlanta, Georgia on April 13th, 2017. The all-day event starts at 8:30 AM and ends at 4:45 PM.The morning will consist of four keynote speeches, all centered around the themes of Prospecting, Pipeline, and Productivity. These are the speeches that we give to the private companies that hire us to speak. The afternoon sessions will include five workshops, including one by our special guest, Laura Madison.I want you to join us at OutBound Atlanta. Go to www.outboundconference.com to register you and your team.OutBound Atlanta is sponsored by Cirrus Insight. Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

Enforcing a ban will not end the menace of stubble burning, say researchers

first_imgOnly educating farmers about the monetary costs of burning stubble can address the environmental crisis triggered every year in Punjab, says a team of Swiss and Indian researchers who interviewed 600 farmers over two years. Burning stubble, the rice chaff left over after harvesting, is linked to winter air-pollution in the State as well as down-wind DelhiAccording to the team, the government’s efforts — earmarking funds for specialised farming equipment (for straw management) or enforcing the state-led ban on the practice — are unlikely to solve the problem.Farmer cooperative groups — a key link between government and farmers — ought to be playing a more active role in educating farmers, say key authors associated with the study. Watch | Farmers continue to burn stubble despite ban Cheap solution“The main message is that farmers are not to blame (for the pollution crisis),” says Max Friedrich, a post-doctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag). “There are deeper causes beyond economic incentives or awareness about the health consequences of burning at play.”On average, about 20 million tonnes of straw are generated in Punjab, and they barely have two to three weeks to dispose them of and prepare the fields for the next crop. Hence the popularity of deploying stubble-burning as a quick and cheap solution.For about a decade now, the Delhi and the Centre have held this practice responsible for the abysmal air quality in the capital in winter.In 2013, the National Green Tribunal issued a directive to Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh asking them to ban such stubble burning. The environment ministers of these States as well as top officials at the Centre declared a “zero tolerance” policy on the burning of stubble, which has been estimated to contribute anywhere from 7% to 78% of the particulate matter-emission load in Delhi during winter.The Centre has spent about ₹600 crore in subsidising farm equipment via village cooperatives to enable farmers to access them and avoid stubble burning. In 2018, Punjab had disbursed about 8,000 farm implements to individual farmers and set up 4,795 custom hiring centres, from where such machinery could be leased. The cost of hiring these machines was about ₹5,000 an acre, as The Hindu has previously reported.Mixed resultsHowever, the success of these efforts has been mixed, even though stubble-fires in 2018 were fewer than in 2017 and 2016, according to satellite maps by independent researchers.In their interviews, the researchers found that farmers who had bigger landholdings were more likely to burn straw; those who used combine harvesters (for cutting the straw) as opposed to manual labourers were more likely to engage in burning; and those who burnt or didn’t burn were equally aware of the steps and procedures required to abstain from burning, said Dr. Friedrich. On average, the input costs of farmers who burned straw were about ₹40,000 per acre and those who didn’t about ₹25,000 per acre but the incomes of those who burned and those who didn’t were closer — about ₹60,000 and ₹50,000 respectively.“There needs to be greater participation by village cooperatives in being able to impose social norms that would dissuade burners,” said Banalata Sen, an independent public health professional, associated with the study, coordinated by Ranas Mosler (affiliated to Eawag), the Centre for Sustainable Agriculture (CSA), Hyderabad and Kethi Virasat Mission (KVM), Jaitu, India.center_img Farmers continue to burn stubble despite banVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:1501:15  last_img read more

Delhi to open Ranji Trophy campaign with Uttar Pradesh

first_imgSeven-time champions Delhi will open their 2012-13 Ranji Trophy campaign with a game against former champions Uttar Pradesh in Meerut from November 2, as per the reorganised format of the national championship.The other teams in Group B are Tamil Nadu, Haryana, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Baroda, Vidarbha, and Orissa. Delhi, like the other 26 teams in the fray, will play eight matches in the league stage, four of them at home and four away.A “randomly” made new rotation cycle has replaced the old one. “The old system of rotation for allotting matches has been discontinued and a new one, designed randomly, has been implemented for the group league matches,” a BCCI official told Mail Today. “The old home-and-away rotation cycle will be used only for the knockout phase.” Accordingly, Uttar Pradesh will visit Delhi for the second successive time in three years. The last match was played in Lucknow in 2009.Delhi will next play against Orissa (in Delhi, Nov 9-12), Baroda (Delhi, Nov 17-20), Tamil Nadu (Delhi, Nov 24-26), Haryana (Haryana, Dec 1-4), Karnataka (Bangalore, Dec 8-11), and Maharashtra (Delhi, Dec 15-18). After rest in the eighth round of matches starting December 22, Delhi will play their last league game against Vidarbha in Nagpur from December 29. Delhi and Vidarbha have never clashed in Ranji before.Delhi, who failed to qualify for the knockout round last season, will start preparations from Wednesday, with a conditioning camp for the 52 probables. It’ll be a joint camp along with the 44 probables for the u-25 tournament. The five-day Ranji final will start on January 26.advertisementlast_img read more

10 months agoChelsea boss Sarri: 2-goal Hazard just like Messi, Ronaldo

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea boss Sarri: 2-goal Hazard just like Messi, Ronaldoby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Maurizio Sarri has likened Eden Hazard to Leo Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.Hazard scored twice for victory at Watford.Sarri said, “Of course he’s very important for us but Messi is very important for Barcelona, Ronaldo is important for Juventus. “He’s a great player, he’s able to play in every position. At the moment he’s playing as a false nine and he’s able to play there.”He scored two and made two or three good assists. He’s very able to open spaces for his team-mates. He can play very well in every position.” last_img read more