Army harassment forces Aceh-based biweekly to close

first_imgReporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) today condemned army harassment of an independent biweekly in the troubled province of Aceh, Beudoh, which forced it to suspend publishing.The newspaper’s editor, known as Maarif, went into hiding after being interrogated for 10 hours on 5 December by military intelligence officers in the provincial capital of Banda Aceh about the content of some of its reports.Reporters Without Borders called on defence minister Matori Abdul Djalil to do everything possible to ensure that the biweekly is able to resume publishing and that the safety of its journalists is guaranteed.In an article that appeared at the end of November, headlined “The Acehnese people do not need elections,” the biweekly criticised the government’s decision to maintain martial law in Aceh and questioned the legitimacy of elections scheduled for next year.Maarif told the Associated Press that the intelligence officers roughed him up and threatened to kill him if he did not change the newspaper’s editorial line. “To change our biweekly’s line is impossible because it is against our policy,” he said. Launched in March, Beudoh is opposed to martial law.Maarif said he also refused to comply with a request from the army officers to publish an apology and to sign a letter recognising that he had published false information.According to the Jakarta Post, the military authorities denied banning the newspaper and said they just summoned the editor to explain to him that its content was “provocative.”In a recent report entitled “Muzzling the Messengers,” Human Rights Watch has documented dozens of arrests, physical attacks and threats against journalists since the Indonesian government renewed its war on the GAM armed separatist movement on 19 May. Since the fighting resumed, Gen. Endang Surawaya has banned the news media from reporting what the rebels say. News News Follow the news on Indonesia August 12, 2020 Find out more News News November 19, 2020 Find out more Red alert for green journalism – 10 environmental reporters killed in five years On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia Army harassment forces Aceh-based biweekly to close Organisation August 21, 2020 Find out more to go further RSF_en IndonesiaAsia – Pacific December 12, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Receive email alerts Melanesia: Facebook algorithms censor article about press freedom in West Papua Help by sharing this information IndonesiaAsia – Pacific last_img read more

Mersch’s magic propels Wisconsin to victory over Michigan

first_imgIt was the first time Wisconsin and Michigan were facing off in a game since 2010, but the Badgers wasted no time in welcoming the Wolverines back to Madison.After a two-goal outburst in the first period and a dominant performance most of the way, Wisconsin somehow let Michigan back into the game in the late going leading 3-2 with 2:02 remaining. But, Michael Mersch soothed the nerves of the 9,499 in attendance with two goals in 38 seconds — the final one giving him a hat trick — as Wisconsin triumphed 5-2 in the return to Big Ten play.It was a night that got off to a bit of an unconventional start for the Badgers (12-6-1 overall, 3-2-0-0 Big Ten), which included abysmal weather outside that led Wisconsin head coach Mike Eaves to thank the fans for making the trek during his opening statement.“I think it was amazing crowd that we had tonight. For the number of people to get here through the weather, it’s just a tribute to the Wisconsin hockey fan and the athletic fan in general (to get that win). So for the people to come out tonight, I really think that’s a tribute to them and the boys really appreciate it,” Eaves said.As far as the game was concerned, the unconventional, or rather odd start was the first goal. Mersch fired a soft wrister 4:07 into the first period that look like an easy glove save for Michigan goaltender Zach Nagelvoort, but the puck ended up deflecting off his glove in behind him, finding the back of the net.Then Wisconsin opened up a two-goal lead midway through that first frame when freshman Grant Besse circled around behind the cage from left to right and fired a shot from the near the left post that ricocheted off Nagelvoort and squeaked over the line.From that point on there was little action and few quality scoring chances until over halfway through the third period when the flood gates opened for both teams.Jefferson Dahl put Wisconsin up 3-0 with 8:13 to go and it looked like Wisconsin had all but sealed the deal.However, Michigan answered just three minutes later to cut the lead to 3-1 on Andrew Copp’s score. Another three minutes later the Wolverines struck again after Joe Faust took a costly high-sticking penalty. Wisconsin had held Michigan scoreless on four previous powerplays, but the Wolverines finally hit twine on their fifth chance when Luke Moffatt beat Rumpel near-side with a blast from the slot to trim the lead to 3-2.On the verge of an improbable comeback, Michigan made one last ditch effort to tie the game with just over a minute and a half left, pulling Nagelvoort for an extra attacker. But the Badgers stood tall to the task, worked the puck out of the zone, and Jefferson Dahl, who had a career-best 4 points on the night, found Mersch in the slot for an empty netter with 1:18 to go.Then with 40 seconds left Dahl and Mersch found themselves on a two-on-one, and Mersch made it count, firing a wrister past Nagelvoort to secure the first hat trick by a Badger player since Justin Schultz Nov. 27, 2010.“The last goal was a goal scorer’s goal. Goal-scorers love to score goals and when they get on a roll that’s a good thing. Ride that wave as long as you can,” Eaves said of Mersch who leads the Big Ten with 14 goals. “I think he hadn’t scored in three or four games, so maybe he’s back on that roll again.”Although Wisconsin responded well in the late going, powering through to only its third win over a ranked opponent in nine tries, there is still one more game left in the series and more work to be done, according to Mersch.“This was a good game for us, but you got to build on it and keep moving forward. So, yeah, signature win for a night, but you got to make it a weekend,” Mersch said.Joel Rumpel came up with 27 saves in the win, improving to 9-1-0 overall, while Nagelvoort stopped 25 shots for Michigan and fell to 6-4-1 this season.[Photos by Chris Lotten]last_img read more

Abedi Pele to meet GFA over sons Andre and Jordan

first_imgFooty-ghana.com can authoritatively confirm that former Black Stars captain Abedi Ayew ‘Pele’ is set to meet the hierarchy of the Ghana Football Association for talks over the temporary retirement of his sons Andre and Jordan Ayew from the national team.Highly-placed footy-ghana.com sources reveal that a government delegation was sent to meet with the Ayew brothers in France and the outcome of that meeting proved positive.Footy-ghana.com understands that in the next few days, Abedi Pele is set to meet with GFA bigwigs to iron out whatever issues his sons may have had that culminated in the withdrawal of their services from the Black Stars.Footy-ghana.com has learnt that should that meeting prove successful, the Ayew brothers would write letters to the GFA rescinding their retirement and making themselves available for the 2014 World Cup qualifier against Zambia in September.It will be recalled that Andre and Jordan Ayew were dropped from Ghana’s 2013 African Nations Cup squad for various reasons and both players withdrew their services from the Black Stars before Ghana’s 4-0 win over Sudan back in March.last_img read more

The sports world reacts to Donald Trump as President of the United States

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error In the hours that followed the announcement of Donald Trump as the country’s 45th president, the topic has proven to be on the mind of many and Southern California athletes and coaches were no exception. Here is some of the reactions expressed on the topic.Viewing on a mobile device? View the sports reaction tweets herelast_img

Social Innovator: Basil Kransdorff

first_imgFounder: e’PapWhy is Basil a Social Innovator?Industrial chemist by day and social entrepreneur by night, Basil Kransdorff has been hailed as a pioneer in food engineering. Basil is the founder of e’Pap, a pre-cooked maize meal that delivers the nutrients of a 10-course meal in a single portion.Not only is e’Pap full of nutrients, it was also formulated to improve the ability of the body to digest food. This is especially beneficial for HIV-positive or malnourished people.e’Pap is a super food that reaches the masses across Africa and has changed the lives of many undernourished or terminally ill people who could not otherwise afford essential food stuffs for themselves or their families.In his own words .“People often believe that products developed in Africa are inferior. We are very proud that we’ve created a state of the art product that we know is going to change the future road map of our continent.”Fast Factse’Pap started as a single project in the Johannesburg General Hospital eight years ago and is now distributed to 15 countries across Africa.Weight gains of between two and five kilograms are reported within five to 10 days of consuming e’Pap, while marked improvements in energy and concentration, sleep habits and skin condition have also been clinically observed.e’Pap is 29 times more nutritionally dense than refined maize and is packed with 28 micro and macro nutrients.Over the last eight years, over 42-million food portions of e’Pap has been delivered via community-based structures across the African continent.A single portion of e’Pap will cost between R1 and R2 a day.How can I help?To find out more about e’Pap and how you can contribute, send Basil an e-mail on [email protected] published on SAinfo on 27 June 2008.Source: Brand South Africalast_img read more

Remarks for consul general Yusuf Omar

first_imgHowever, it was not just the prospect of escaping those winters that caused me such excitement when I learnt my next assignment was to be Sao Paulo. What got my adrenalin going was the prospect of playing a part, however small, in the building of a historic relationship. What Brazil and South Africa and our other partners in the so-called south do together in the years and decades ahead will, I am confident, mean better lives for untold millions of our people. Together, we are striving for a system of global governance which is more democratic and which more accurately reflects the world as it is, rather than as it was half a century ago. Together, we are working to achieve a new set of international trade rules that will empower the hitherto disempowered to lift themselves out of poverty, for the betterment of all. Our countries share many daunting challenges, but we also share a capacity to innovate and find solutions.. For example, who could fail to be profoundly impressed by Brazil’s achievements in the fields of alternative energy or combating HIV? South Africans, too, are ingenious people. A third of our petroleum needs we furnish from coal. With the pebble bed modular reactor we are on the threshold of revolutionizing the economics of nuclear power. In Paris this week we are showing off what could well be the world’s first truly affordable electric car. .Technological problems are not the only things we are good at. We have successfully confronted political and social problems that have left less fortunate societies in ashes. Many have called the way we brought down the curtain on apartheid a miracle or they have attributed it to the greatness of one undoubtedly great man, Nelson Mandela. But our democratic transition was neither miracle nor the work of any individual. It was a testament, like Mandela himself, to the content of our people’s character. .Yes, we have a serious crime problem in South Africa. Paulistanos would be the first to admit that theirs is not the safest community in the world, either. We share with you the reality of being rapidly urbanizing economies characterized, as such economies always are, by major disparities in wealth. These are harsh realities that breed crime. But the criminals are not representative of who we are, Brazilian or South African. The fundamental spirit of South Africa is captured in the word ubuntu. It is a difficult world to translate but is closely akin to the quality the Roman philosopher Seneca called humanitas or humanity. This he defined as ”the quality which stops one being arrogant towards one’s fellows, or being acrimonious. In words, in actions, in emotions humanity reveals herself as kind and good natured towards all. To her the troubles of anyone else are her own, and anything that benefits herself she welcomes primarily because it will be of benefit to someone else.” Like every young democracy, we have our good days and our bad days, but the good preponderate and sometimes observers mistake for bad days that are in fact very good. Some have been alarmed by our recent change of leadership. But I would urge you to consider this. Our ruling party’s decision to recall President Mbeki was no different that the British Labour party’s decision to replace Tony Blair while in office or the Conservative party’s to replace Margaret Thatcher. Nobody for a moment thought that Britain’s democracy or its institutions were under threat at those junctures. No one should think that about South Africa, either. Our democracy and our institutions – our judiciary, our robust free press, our financial system — all are solid, rooted in what I believe is one of the most stable societies anywhere. One of our newspaper columnists last week compared South Africa with a pond when you throw a stone into it. There is a splash and there are ripples, but calm always returns. South Africa, he wrote, was not a piece of glass that shatters. We are also a very practical, results-oriented people. You can see that in our economic policies and you can see it in our diplomacy. I very much hope my own tenure here in Sao Paulo will serve to further illustrate this. I am looking forward to reaching out and far and wide as I possibly can in this great region and working to build partnerships that will make a real difference in people’s lives. Thank you for your warm and generous welcome.last_img read more

‘We rise to any challenge’ – Zuma

first_imgSouth African President Jacob Zuma showsoff his football skills in parliament beforethe 2009 Confederations Cup, flanked by2010 Fifa World Cup Organising CommitteeCEO Danny Jordaan (left) and Fifasecretary-general Jérôme Falcke (right).(Image: LOC)MEDIA CONTACTS• Wolfgang Eichler, Fifa Media Officer+27 11 567 2010 or +27 83 2010 [email protected]• Delia Fischer, Fifa Media Officer+27 11 567 2010 or +27 11 567 [email protected] • Jermaine Craig, Media Manager2010 Fifa World CupLocal Organising Committee+27 11 567 2010 or +27 83 201 [email protected] RELATED ARTICLES• Mandela meets final Bafana squad• Black Stars shine for Africa• Meet Bafana’s number-one fan• 2010 World Cup journalist’s toolkit• 2010 World Cup: SA’s great leap forward?As South Africa enters its last week of hosting the 2010 Fifa World Cup, President Jacob Zuma has said in an interview with Fifa that his country’s organisation of the tournament has exceeded expectations – and confounded the sceptics.Speaking at the presidential residence in Pretoria, Zuma discussed the legacy of the tournament, its effect on nation-building, and his favourite teams. This is an edited version of the interview.Fifa: With only a week left in the 2010 Fifa World Cup, what are your impression so far of the tournament? Jacob Zuma: I think the tournament is going extremely well and South Africans are happy. You just have to see the reactions of the people at the matches.I must also say that the international community is happy about this tournament. I had an opportunity to be in Toronto at the G8 meeting and there was much excitement among other heads of state. I think we have proved that not only South Africa, but Africa is capable of hosting any major event.When you were in prison on Robben Island, did you imagine that South Africa would host an event of this magnitude, and you would be in charge of the country when it took place?I don’t think any of us imagined that. At that time we were campaigning for the isolation of apartheid South Africa. And when Fifa took a decision to ban South Africa, it was a significant step. We only dreamed that, one day, a free and equal South Africa would participate in international competitions. We never thought that South Africa, so early on, would host a World Cup.In any case, when I was in Robben Island I never thought I would be president. It is indeed a humbling experience.How important was it for South Africa to succeed at this Fifa World Cup, given the scepticism some have shown in its ability to do so?I think it was very important for us to succeed. You must remember that, as South Africans, we pride ourselves on the fact that we always rise up to any challenge. As a matter of fact, nobody believed that we would have a smooth transition from apartheid – but we did it.As you know, a Fifa World Cup has never been hosted in Africa. When South Africa first declared its intentions to host the World Cup, some people said, “What is this country from Africa thinking?”Yes, we lost the first time (to Germany), but we knew we would do it the next time. That is what defines us as a country – our belief that nothing is impossible.When we completed the stadiums, people started to talk about security and other issues, but we have had a great tournament. And today a lot of people who are honest enough have come out and said, “We were wrong about your country.”The tournament has also been seen as an opportunity for nation-building in this young democracy. Do you think that has been achieved?Absolutely, beyond expectations. It has been an important component of our nation-building. This is the first time we have seen this Rainbow Nation really coming together in a manner we have not witnessed before. For the first time, every South African is now flying our national flag. Everybody is just crazy about the tournament, both black and white.Do you think that successfully hosting the 2010 Fifa World Cup will make it easier for the country to win bids to host other international events?We have proved to the world that we are capable of hosting any international event, that we have the resources and infrastructure. People are already talking about the possibility of bidding for major events, such as the Olympics. I don’t see why we can’t bid to host the Olympics in the future. It’s important for Africa.What lessons, as a government, have you learned from hosting the World Cup?There are many. For one, we learned a lot about how to work with strict timelines. We have embarked on a lot of development and we had to work within a tight schedule in order to deliver on time.You are known for your love for football. How many matches have you been able to watch, and which team has impressed you so far?I have watched many games. I think this Fifa World Cup has been different. The football has been so unpredictable. Some of the countries who were favourites are now out of the tournament and the gap between the so-called big teams and other teams is narrowing.Of course, there are countries that have played well. Even though Bafana Bafana did not qualify, I think we played good football. We were so close to qualifying.I have been impressed with the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal and Germany. I think the Germans has reinvented their game: they are playing with so much speed and it’s good to watch them. And the teams from Latin America have been great: Brazil and Argentina are a pleasure to watch. In Africa, we are proud of Ghana – they have represented us well.May we put you in the spot and ask you to predict the team that will win the tournament on 11 July?It’s difficult to say, but I think the winner will be among the teams I have mentioned (laughing).There is a lot of talk about the legacy of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. What legacy would you like it to leave for South Africa’s children?Firstly, the world is aware that Africa has the capacity to host the World Cup. Everybody has seen that we are equal to the task. It has taken our economic development to a new level.One of the important things for Africa is education and programmes like 1Goal are playing a vital role – that is legacy. The tournament has inspired Africans.last_img read more

South Africa’s plan for a better future

first_imgSouth Africa’s National Development Plan, a blueprint for eliminating poverty and reducing inequality in the country by 2030, was presented to President Jacob Zuma by National Planning Minister Trevor Manuel during a joint sitting of both Houses of Parliament on Wednesday.‘We say to one another: I cannot be without you, without you this South African community is an incomplete community, without one single person, without one single group, without the region or the continent, we are not the best that we can be’ – from South Africa’s National Development Plan (Photo: South African Government, via Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0)Brand South Africa reporter South Africa’s National Development Plan seeks to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030 by drawing on the energies of the the country’s people, growing an inclusive economy, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnerships throughout society.Following months of public consultation and revision, the National Development Plan 2030 was handed over to President Jacob Zuma by the chairperson of the National Planning Commission, Minister Trevor Manuel, during a joint sitting of both Houses of Parliament in Cape Town on Wednesday.The commission released a draft of the plan in November, following this up with six months of nationwide public consultation. The revised document, entitled “Our future – make it work”, takes into account inputs received from South Africans from all walks of life, as well as business, labour, government departments, the nine provinces, and state-owned enterprises and agencies.The Cabinet will now consider the plan before making an announcement on its implementation.NDP 2030: Our future – make it work “This is a historic occasion,” Manuel told Parliament on Wednesday. “This plan is the product of thousands of inputs and perspectives of South Africans. It is a plan for a better future, a future in which no person lives in poverty, where no one goes hungry, where there is work for all.”He said the plan was about the actions that all South Africans should take to secure the future chartered in the country’s Constitution.Eliminating poverty, reducing inequalityThe plan focuses on the elimination of poverty – reducing the proportion of households with a monthly income below R419 per person from 39 percent to zero – and reduction of inequality in South Africa.Other goals include increasing employment from 13-million in 2010 to 24-million by 2030; broadening the country’s ownership of assets to historically disadvantaged groups; ensuring that all children have at least two years of pre-school education and that all children can read and write by grade 3; providing affordable access to healthcare; and ensuring effective public transport.Manuel said that, during the consultation process, it emerged that there was an incredible amount of goodwill that needed to be tapped into.However, there were problems in the country that needed strong leadership, such as joblessness, children who could not read or count, services that did not function, and public officials that were uncaring.Interventions for a better futureThe plan emphasises the need for a strategy to address poverty and its impacts by broadening access to employment, strengthening the social wage, improving public transport and raising rural incomes.It also outlines the steps that need to be taken by the state to professionalise the public service, strengthen accountability, improve coordination and prosecute corruption.It calls for private investment to be boosted in labour-intensive areas, competitiveness and exports. It also stresses the need for jobs to be located where people live, for informal settlements to be upgraded, and for housing market gaps to be closed.The plan suggests that public infrastructure investment be set at 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP).It says that crime can be reduced by strengthening the criminal justice system and improving community environments, and that National Health Insurance should be phased in with a focus on upgrading public health facilities, producing more health professionals, and reducing the relative cost of private healthcare.‘Doing things differently’“Progress over the next two decades means doing things differently,” the plan states, setting out six interlinked priorities:Uniting all South Africans around a common programme to achieve prosperity and equity.Promoting active citizenry to strengthen development, democracy and accountability.Bringing about faster economic growth, higher investment and greater labour absorption.Focusing on key capabilities of people and the state.Building a capable and developmental state.Encouraging strong leadership throughout society to work together to solve problems.While achieving of these objectives will require progress on a broad front, the plan states, “three priorities stand out”:Raising employment through faster economic growth.Improving the quality of education, skills development and innovation.Building the capability of the state to play a developmental, transformative role.Removing structural impediments“A sustainable increase in employment will require a faster-growing economy and the removal of structural impediments, such as poor-quality education or spatial settlement patterns that exclude the majority,” the plan argues. “These are essential to achieving higher rates of investment and competitiveness, and expanding production and exports.”At the same time, the plan stresses the need for business, labour, communities and the government to work together to achieve faster economic growth.“Social cohesion needs to anchor the strategy. If South Africa registers progress in deracialising ownership and control of the economy without reducing poverty and inequality, transformation will be superficial.“Similarly, if poverty and inequality are reduced without demonstrably changed ownership patterns, the country’s progress will be turbulent and tenuous.”Manuel said the methodology used in the plan “was to set overarching objectives, to set key targets for various sectors, and to make recommendations on how these targets can be achieved.”Linkages between goalsHe also noted that there were linkages between the goals in the plan.“Better quality schooling will make it easier for young people to access the labour market. But it also enables workers to improve their productivity, to learn faster on the job and to raise their incomes and living standards.”He added that good public transport would help people search for work over a wider area, and help get them to work faster and more cheaply, but it would also enable people to live fuller lives with more family and recreation time.Manuel said the National Planning Commission would now turn its attention to mobilising society to support the plan and conducting research on critical issues affecting long-term development, and advise the government and its social partners on the implementation of the plan.The African National Congress (ANC) welcomed the plan and commended the Commission for the work it had done. The Democratic Alliance (DA) also welcomed the plan, saying it hoped the government would align its programmes to the goals contained in it.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Small Steps to Improve Health and Wealth

first_imgBy Barbara O’Neill, Ph.D., CFP®, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, [email protected] don’t have problems any more. They have “issues” and some of these issues (e.g., obesity, diabetes, lack of savings, and high debt) affect their health and personal finances. Service members and their families, of course, are not immune. The Cooperative Extension Small Steps to Health and Wealth™ (SSHW) program encourages people to make positive changes to simultaneously improve their health and personal finances. Below are specific steps:Convert Consumption Into Labor- Research how many hours of exercise, gardening, house cleaning, or other physical activity are needed to burn off a certain number of calories. A comparable financial example is “converting spending into labor” by calculating how many hours of work are needed in order to buy something.Meet Yourself Halfway- To lose weight, decrease portion sizes by one-half. For example, eat one cookie instead of two. A comparable financial example is to reduce spending on “discretionary” expenses such as meals eaten away from home, lottery tickets, clothing, and food. Don’t cut out spending on these items completely but spend less than you do now. Plans to change are more likely to succeed when people don’t feel “deprived.”Downsize Eating and Spending- Buying less food saves calories and cuts costs. For example, eat lunch portions or appetizers at restaurants and/or take food home for another meal. Household spending can also be downsized. Simply figure out ways to purchase items for less (e.g., thrift shops) or buy fewer of them.Say No to Super-Sizing- No matter how much of a “deal” upgrading a meal’s size may be, don’t be tempted. Rather, eat fewer calories by ordering smaller portions. Ditto for non-food spending such as “buy three and save” offers when you only need one item. Avoid “deals” that require you to spend more to “save” more.Track Eating and Spending- Most people don’t know how many calories they consume daily or how many dollars they spend monthly on “incidentals” such as snacks, beverages, children’s expenses, and gifts. One of the best ways to increase awareness of current practices is to record foods eaten and dollars spent for a typical month or two. Then analyze relationships between eating, spending, and emotions and make needed adjustments.Photo by Alan Cleaver. CC BY 2.0Compare Yourself with Recommended Guidelines- A nutrition example is body mass index (BMI). A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered healthy, 25 to 29.9 overweight, 30 to 39.9 obese, and 40+ morbidly obese. A comparable financial example is a person’s consumer debt-to-income ratio, which is calculated by dividing monthly consumer debt payments by monthly take-home (net) pay. The recommended ratio is 15%-20% or less.Start Small- Simple behavior changes, such as drinking an small can of soda instead of a large bottle (or, better still, water!) or using less butter, salad dressing or other spreads, can help people lose weight. The same is true for small financial changes. Two examples are saving a dollar a day, plus pocket change, in a can or jar and adding $1 a day (about $30 monthly) to the minimum monthly payment required on a credit card.Follow Nutrition and Personal Finance Standards-People often understand portion sizes better when they are compared to common objects. Three ounces of meat is the size of a deck of cards and one cup of rice or pasta looks like a tennis ball. A common standard for personal finances is saving three to six months expenses for emergencies. This means an emergency fund of $6,000 to $12,000 for a household that spends $2,000 a month.Control Intake and Outgo- For weight loss and improved health, this means reducing the calories you consume, increasing exercise to burn off more calories, or doing both. For improved finances and positive cash flow, increased income, reduced expenses, or doing both, are the keys to success.For additional ideas about strategies to improve health and personal finances, visit the SSHW website. For a personalized assessment of personal health and financial management practices, take the Personal Health and Finance Quiz and save the date of October 11 for a webinar on this topic. Health & Wealth Relationships will be presented by the MFLN Personal Finance and MFLN Nutrition & Wellness teams. This 90-minute presentation will focus on the correlations between positive financial behaviors and positive health behaviors.last_img read more