Merton to fight Council in £1 million High Court battle

first_imgMerton has launched a High Court legal challenge to Oxford City Council’s social housing charge. Under a new policy, permission for student accommodation will only be granted if a financial contribution is secured towards social housing elsewhere in Oxford. These rules apply to buildings of 20 or more bedrooms.Merton College is leading a group of several colleges, and student housing developer McLaren Property, in alleging that  the charge is a “an unauthorised housing tax”. According to UK law, councils can levy charges but not taxes on the construction of property.Merton planned to build accommodation for 298 students at Manor Place in central Oxford, but says the scheme is now unviable due to the charge. Merton cites an increase in cost of £140 per square metre, plus a five per cent administration charge, as reasons for halting building plans. The charge has been estimated to add £1m to the cost of the scheme.Oxford Brookes University also criticised the policy, saying that for the 313- bed Dorset House development on London Road, the council’s changes would have meant forcibly giving £1.37m towards affordable housing.A statement from Merton and McLaren said, “This legal process is now the only possible method of challenge available to us of a policy which will have the effect of making the development at Manor Place unviable. The impact of the policy does not solely affect Manor Place, but will have a wider implication across other potential development sites in the city.”Stuart Black, Development Manager of McLaren, said, “The plan would stop dead student accommodation in Oxford that is done on a commercial basis.”A City Council spokesman defended the policies, telling The Oxford Mail that, “We will continue to defend the adoption of these policies as fair and appropriate.”Colin Cook, a council board member specialising in city development, said he wanted to prioritise new homes over student accomodation. He claimed that the policy removes a loophole that allows developers to recieve permission for student flats that are later used as private homes.Although Oxford University is not participating in the legal challenge, a spokesperson stated, “Through developing student accommodation, the University and colleges alleviate the pressure on the private rental market in the city, and meet obligations laid down by the City Council. These things are of benefit to the local community. Yet under these changes, we will be penalised for doing so.“Oxford students benefit from greater provision of University and college owned accommodation than those at almost any other university. This offers protection from the private rental market, allowing undergraduates in particular to pay rent only in term time, making a cost saving.“Oxford students will continue to be well provided with accommodation, even under these changes.”A Merton student commented, “On the one hand, Merton has a load of money. But no one likes spending a million pounds.”last_img read more

All inspections in tourism are united. From now on, tourist inspectors will be able to enter unregistered facilities

first_imgIllegal renters are unfair competition and a big problem of our tourism. Almost every tourist board is struggling with the problem of unregistered activities. Inspections are being merged, and the reorganization of the independent State Inspectorate should make the work of inspections more efficient and functional. In tourism, it should enable a clearer and more concrete fight against the black and gray economy. Non-payment of taxes and non-registration of workers is one of the main motivators of the Chamber of Trades and Crafts’ efforts to reorganize the State Inspectorate. In order to implement better control and bring order to the black and gray zone, according to the new law, all inspections in tourism will be unified and inspectors will be able to enter facilities that have not reported renting accommodation. Recall, in accordance with the new amendments to the Law on Hospitality, which, among other things, requires that tourism inspectors have the opportunity to apply the principle of opportunity, ie the possibility that minor violations can be warned, with a deadline to correct irregularities, not to they immediately print out fines. Caterers and artisans often met with inspectors, and sometimes with more than one at a time. “It is certainly embarrassing for us if three or four different inspections come to us in one period of time and make a mess for us, a blockade in the workplace and it is certainly nasty, especially when the bars are full in the middle of the tourist season.”, Said Stjepan Knežević, vice president of the Croatian Chamber of Trades and Crafts, adding that previously only customs could enter the premises that work illegally, and other inspectors did not. “We also wanted tourism inspectors to have the authority to enter where there is unfair competition, where undeclared work is.” Certainly, it is in everyone’s interest to suppress the black market, because they are unfair competition to legal landlords. “Apart from tourism inspectors, all inspectors have the right, among other things, not only to deal with registered facilities but also those suspected of being unregistered. With legal changes, they can enter these facilities very quickly and efficiently”, Explained Tonči Glavina, State Secretary of the Ministry of Tourism for HRT. However, renters are sometimes not aware or sufficiently educated about the legal regulations related to this tourist activity. “People involved in this business need to be educated. Due to the fact that they are mostly older people and they are simply not familiar enough with the laws, they are not familiar enough with the procedures and in that direction there is a lack of more education than control.”, Said Daniel Radeta, president of the Association of Private Accommodation Landlords Zadar. Source: HRTlast_img read more

St. Agnes To Host Christmas Concert

first_imgATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — The St. Agnes Catholic Church’s 17th annual Christmas choral concert will be held at 3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 11.The concert will consist of performances by the St. Agnes adult and children’s choirs and the new St. Agnes Men’s Community Chorus.For the 17th consecutive year, the program will be directed by G. Thomas Elliott, the now-retired musical director at Henry Hudson Regional School. Accompaniment will be provided by Corina Pauta, the church’s new organist.Joanna Kearney will be the principal soloist.    The public is welcome and admission is free. Attendees are urged to bring donations for the AtlanticHighlands Food Pantry. The church is located at the corner of Center Avenueand Avenue C.last_img read more

STAKES QUOTES – ARCADIA STAKES (SATURDAY, FEB. 11, 2017)

first_imgJOCKEY QUOTES MIKE SMITH, BOLO, WINNER: “It’s his first race back (in seven months) and it’s his first time wearing a rubber bit. I had a bit of trouble. He’s so strong; it’s like pulling on the barn. If you give him daylight, he’ll just run off with me, which he’s done before.“Carla and her crew are wonderful. He had a breathing problem and they’ve taken care of that. They got him to this race and he just ran dynamite. I’m happy he ran the way he did today.“I thought I had a good shot through the lane. When Graham Motion’s horse came up on the outside of us, it was like Talladega Nights, time to ‘Shake ‘n’ Bake baby!’ He helped me push by What a View.” KEITH BRACKPOOL ON BEHALF OF GOLDEN PEGASUS RACING, INC., CO-OWNERS OF BOLO, WINNER:  “He’s something else, this horse. Carla and I were saying, ‘Get third, get third,’ then, “Get second, get second.’ I didn’t think we had won until I saw the replay – amazing. We’ll take a look at the Kilroe (Grade I, mile on turf, March 11) next.” TYLER BAZE, WHAT A VIEW, SECOND: “I can’t beat Smith! What a View ran good, really good. I’m just tired of getting beat by Smith today.“I thought I had it once I fought off Conquest Enforcer, which I thought was the horse to beat. He came head to head with my horse and my horse dug in hard. Especially that last sixteenth of a mile. I thought, ‘Good. We’re home free!’ Then Bolo…it’s frustrating.“If Bolo was closer to us, and my horse saw him coming, we might have won. He would have dug back in. He wouldn’t have let that horse go by. He’s a nice horse to ride.”center_img TRAINER QUOTES NOTES: The winning owners are Golden Pegasus Racing, Inc. and E.I. Mack, LLC.last_img read more

Gap Between Origin-of-Life Research and Simplest Life Grows

first_imgEvolutionists are celebrating experiments that allegedly showed RNA chains can assemble in water – given nucleotides to start with (see Science Daily).  The suggestive steps over the gap from nonlife to life should be tempered with other discoveries that life is anything but simple.    New Scientist reported today that a “‘Simple’ bacterium shows surprising complexity.”  A species of Mycoplasma, an obligate parasite, should represent a stripped-down life form that can be considered a minimal living cell.  Researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory uncovered “uncanny flexibility and sophistication, allowing it to react fast to changes in its diet and environment,” even with just 689 genes (compared to 4000 in most other bacteria).  Peter Bork said, “There were a lot of surprises.  Although it’s a very tiny genome, it’s much more complicated than we thought.”  Among the cell’s tricks are the ability to use antisense strands of DNA as molecular switches, the ability to employ operons in sequence rather than simultaneously, and ability of cellular components to do multitasking.    Another report on Science Daily described the highly-choreographed dance of the chromosomes during meiosis.  Scientists at UC Berkeley found that “the cytoskeleton appears to encourage the dance of the chromosomes around the nuclear membrane as they search for their partners, and help make sure they have the right partner before meiosis continues.”  The cytoskeleton does this by means of teams of molecular motors called dyneins.  “Our work teaches us about the fundamental mechanisms of genome organization, about how cells execute processes in precise ways, monitor their own mistakes and correct or eliminate them.”    A cell is so smart, it can even employ mistakes on purpose.  Science Daily reported that some cells cause their own mutations for protection.  By making proteins with mistakes (the wrong amino acid inserted here or there), they employ a “non-genetic strategy used in cells to create a bodyguard for proteins.”  As a result, “this way the cells can always ensure that a subset of these proteins is somewhat less sensitive to the extra hits” caused by invading viruses, chemicals or other bacteria.  It “sounds chaotic and doesn’t make a lot of sense according to the textbook,” but the net result is that the organism gains protection from reactive oxygen species when under stress by means of “regulated errors.”  The organism must have ways of recovering from these errors after the stress is relieved, else the population would mutate itself out of existence.    Interestingly, human designers might employ a similar strategy to ward off computer viruses.  New Scientist reported that a company in the UK is patenting a strategy to insert “dumb code” into file headers to defeat any computer virus instantly.  “A key feature of the scheme is that no knowledge of the virus itself is needed, so it can deal with new, unrecognised ‘zero day’ viruses as well as older ones,” the company claims.  It remains to be seen whether human programmers will be as successful at defensive strategies as cells are.If cells are so well designed they can even regulate errors to maintain their genetic integrity, how could life evolve?  This might be a defeater for neo-Darwinism.  And if even the most minimal life is so complex it surprises scientists, how can origin-of-life researchers keep up hope?  Their simple experiments are like baby steps on the beach with an ocean to cross, and no motivation for the baby to go in that direction.Details, details.  They sure get in the way of a good myth.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Social Innovator: Basil Kransdorff

first_imgFounder: e’PapWhy is Basil a Social Innovator?Industrial chemist by day and social entrepreneur by night, Basil Kransdorff has been hailed as a pioneer in food engineering. Basil is the founder of e’Pap, a pre-cooked maize meal that delivers the nutrients of a 10-course meal in a single portion.Not only is e’Pap full of nutrients, it was also formulated to improve the ability of the body to digest food. This is especially beneficial for HIV-positive or malnourished people.e’Pap is a super food that reaches the masses across Africa and has changed the lives of many undernourished or terminally ill people who could not otherwise afford essential food stuffs for themselves or their families.In his own words .“People often believe that products developed in Africa are inferior. We are very proud that we’ve created a state of the art product that we know is going to change the future road map of our continent.”Fast Factse’Pap started as a single project in the Johannesburg General Hospital eight years ago and is now distributed to 15 countries across Africa.Weight gains of between two and five kilograms are reported within five to 10 days of consuming e’Pap, while marked improvements in energy and concentration, sleep habits and skin condition have also been clinically observed.e’Pap is 29 times more nutritionally dense than refined maize and is packed with 28 micro and macro nutrients.Over the last eight years, over 42-million food portions of e’Pap has been delivered via community-based structures across the African continent.A single portion of e’Pap will cost between R1 and R2 a day.How can I help?To find out more about e’Pap and how you can contribute, send Basil an e-mail on [email protected] published on SAinfo on 27 June 2008.Source: Brand South Africalast_img read more

Sathya Sai Baba’s devotee Isaac Tigrett claims to be his ‘living will’

first_imgOne of late Sathya Sai Baba’s most famous devotees – Isaac Tigrett, the founder of  Hard Rock Cafe and House of Blues – on Wednesday claimed that he was the “living will” of the departed spiritual guru. Claiming that he was “a living will of Bhagwan”, Tigrett said that Sai Baba had given him instructions on how he wanted the ashram to run. Reports suggested that Tigrett has also promised to reveal the secret told to him by Sai Baba in six weeks. He was also willing to share it with Sri Sathya Sai Central Trust. Tigrett lives in Sai Baba’s ashram Prasanthi Nilayam. The US-born businessman shared a close relationship with Sai Baba. He had donated money for the construction of a high-end hospital in Puttaparthi. The members of Sri Sathya Sai Central Trust however dismissed Tigrett’s claim saying that there were no secrets kept by Sai Baba. For more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

KKR vs KXIP preview: Kings brace for tough Knights

first_imgIt will be a battle to savour when Kolkata Knight Riders and Kings XI Punjab clash in Qualifier 1 at the Eden Gardens on Tuesday.While the hosts are on a high after registering seven wins in a row, KXIP have been the most impressive team this season and deservedly topped the points table.But as KKR skipper Gautam Gambhir said, it will be a new day and more importantly a big stage. While coming first and second in the group stage gives the two teams the cushion of having another crack at the final berth if they lose on Tuesday, they would look to grab a place in the final at the first attempt. But all plans could go for a toss as rain is in the air. Thundershowers on Monday afternoon meant neither team could train.The forecast is similar for Tuesday as well. If there is no result on Tuesday, the teams will lock horns on Wednesday – the reserve day.The Eden Gardens has been a fortress for Kolkata as they are yet to lose a match here this season and the local support has been amazing. Even on Monday, hundreds of people were seen braving the rain to queue up outside the Mohammedan Sporting ground to buy tickets for Tuesday’s match.While both the Orange Cap and Purple Cap in the to the KKR camp, courtesy Robin Uthappa and Sunil Narine, the team would be pleased with the way out-of-touch Yusuf Pathan showed a touch of his old self against SunRisers Hyderabad on Saturday.advertisementWith the Eden wicket having quite a bit of grass, the likes of Morne Morkel have also thrived. But KXIP can’t be taken lightly and KKR know that well. Not only do they have the likes of Glenn Maxwell, David Miller, George Bailey and Manan Vohra to start with, even wicketkeeper Wriddhiman Saha seems to have turned a new leaf with the bat. And one can never discount the veteran Virender Sehwag.The bowling unit might not other than Mitchell Johnson, but the likes of Sandeep Sharma and Akshar Patel have got noticed. Even senior campaigners like L. Balaji have pitched in.While Gambhir doesn’t believe too much in momentum, Bailey does. The fact that after losing a couple of matches in the middle of the season KXIP are back to winning ways, gives him confidence.”I don’t want to give away too much, but we would definitely like to repeat what we did against KXIP in the group stages,” KKR coach Trevor Bayliss said. “While we had lost the first match, I feel we did very well against them in the second game. We have to be on our game and considering the kind of talent they have, we have to concentrate on doing our job well,” he said.Bayliss said players of Sehwag’s calibre can turn any game on its head.”He is still a very dangerous player. Maybe the consistency falls a bit with such players, but it doesn’t mean they can’t win matches singlehandedly. He has done well in different stages in the tournament and can be very destructive. We will look to get him early,” he said.Commenting on his team’s dream run, Bayliss said he would still like to see the bowling improve.”Apart from that, I can’t see too many areas that we need to work on. We are at the top of our game and have peaked at the right time.”KXIP coach Sanjay Bangar said he is not too worried about KKR’s seven-match winning streak. “Past records don’t indicate anything. All the teams in the playoffs are here because they have done well. We have been doing well for a longer time,” he said.While the Eden crowd can be daunting for the opposition, Bangar is looking forward to the occasion. “Eden produces great cricket and the crowd will add to the atmosphere. We will revel in the conditions,” he said.last_img read more

ESPN Mistakes Devin Booker For Arrested Notre Dame DB Devin Butler

first_imgESPN accidentally uses Devin Booker photo on Notre Dame report.ESPN.ESPN’s SportsCenter made quite an error in their broadcast of Notre Dame cornerback Devin Butler’s arrest last night.First, Butler was arrested yesterday on preliminary felony charges of battery to law enforcement and resisting arrest. Then, when reporting the arrest on Saturday night’s SportsCenter, ESPN managed to confuse Butler with Phoenix Suns guard Devin Booker. They very clearly selected the wrong photo for the broadcast.The hiccup definitely didn’t go unnoticed by viewers. Social media lit up, calling out the station for the [email protected] whoops. @DevinBook pic.twitter.com/sHKYdf1ybT— JTrain (@purplePHXorange) August 21, 2016When they realized the mistake, SportsCenter issued an apology. Anchor Zuban Memento read the statement after the commercial break.You can watch it below:@DevinBook @espn @SportsCenter pic.twitter.com/uAJAgVOWF4— JTrain (@purplePHXorange) August 21, 2016The transcription of his apology is below:“We are back on SportsCenter, and an apology we’d like to make. When reporting on a story earlier this hour on Notre Dame cornerback Devin Butler, we accidentally used a photo of the Phoenix Suns’ Devin Booker. We all here at SportsCenter do sincerely apologize for that mistake.”Butler has since been indefinitely suspended by Notre Dame’s football program.last_img read more

Red Cross funds study into how Fort McMurray wildfire affected First Nation

first_imgThe Canadian PressMelanie Dene still remembers the harrowing ordeal of driving through fiery hell during the evacuation of Fort McMurray six months ago with her two young daughters.The chaos of traffic-choked roads, the thick smoke from the massive northern Alberta wildfire and flames so hot that her car stalled _ its engine on fire _ are all still fresh in her mind.“It was scary and I was like ‘Oh my God,” she said. “I just started praying and telling my girls that it was going to be OK.“There was just fire dropping everywhere. I just can’t get that image out of my head. My first thought was we are going to die.”Dene and her family lost their home and all of their belongings in the fire but made it out safely. They now live in Edmonton.She and others are now the subject of a research study into how the wildfire affected First Nation and Metis communities in and around the Fort McMurray region.The Canadian Red Cross is funding research, which involves talking to people whose homes were destroyed in the city, who faced food shortages in outlying communities and those who can no longer hunt, trap or pick berries because of the charred terrain.The study involves five First Nations that make up the Athabasca Tribal Council along with the Wood Buffalo, Willow Lake and Chard Metis communities and other organizations.Maggie Farrington, CEO of the tribal council, said they hope to learn how to help communities recover from the fire and be better prepared for future disasters. The council estimates about 10,000 Indigenous people live in the region, including some who lost homes in some of the hardest hit city neighbourhoods.The $500,000 study is being conducted by a consulting firm and will include asking people to share what happened to them during the fire.“There is a healing element in telling stories,” Farrington said. “At some point their stories will contribute to a larger dialogue to help build a resiliency that we really hope will be the ultimate result of this research.”The report is to be completed in 18 months and its findings are to be shared with governments.Farrington said Indigenous people are determined to bounce back from the wildfire, including eight of her staff who lost homes in the blaze.The tribal council building survived, but the flames scorched the teepee lodge polls the organization uses for ceremonies. Staff simply scraped off the charred areas so they can be used again.Before May 3, Dene always thought of fire as a source of warmth, not as something mean and destructive. She said it took time before she could even look at a campfire, but finally came to terms with her fear.During a birthday celebration for one of her daughters she made a point of looking directly into the flames in a fireplace.“It was really hard for me. I was terrified. But I did it,” she said.“It has been six months and I still feel that we are still experiencing the trauma.”[email protected]last_img read more