USS Kauffman, USCG Seize USD 25 Mln Worth of Drugs

first_img View post tag: Drugs Share this article View post tag: Naval Authorities View post tag: USS Kauffman Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Kauffman, USCG Seize USD 25 Mln Worth of Drugs View post tag: americas USS Kauffman, USCG Seize USD 25 Mln Worth of Drugscenter_img View post tag: USD 25 Mln View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USCG July 9, 2015 View post tag: Navy In two separate operations conducted in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, the US Navy’s guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG 59), along with the U.S. Coast Guard, intercepted a large quantity of drugs and detained suspected narcotic-smugglers.The team seized 582 kilograms of cocaine, estimated to be worth approximately $11.6 million. Three suspected smugglers were detained in this operation.After spotting the suspected smuggling vessel during a routine patrol, Kauffman’s embarked U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment boarded the vessel and seized the illicit cargo. After which they took custody of the three crew members and recovered the illicit cargo, some of which was jettisoned overboard before the team boarded the vessel.In the second operation, conducted on June 21, the USS Kauffman (FFG 59), and USCG personnel, intercepted 598 kg of cocaine, worth an estimated $14.7 million, and detained three members of a suspected narcotic-trafficking vessel.Kauffman’s embarked SH-60B Sea Hawk helicopter, from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Light Squadron (HSL) 60, spotted the suspected smuggling vessel and Kauffman’s embarked USCG LEDET boarded the vessel, they discovered several bales of illicit cargo, which they identified as cocaine. Three crew members from the vessel were then taken into custody, along with the illicit cargo, and brought back to Kauffman.The Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman is currently deployed to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Martillo.Image: US Navylast_img read more

Using evolution to understand pollution

first_imgLife evolved in a toxic world long before humans began polluting it, according to a University of Massachusetts environmental toxicologist, who added that understanding life’s evolutionary response to environmental poisons can help people to fight destructive effects.Emily Monosson, an adjunct professor in the UMass Department of Environmental Conservation and author of the book “Evolution in a Toxic World,” said that an understanding of both how rapidly and how slowly life can evolve to fight toxic pollutants is largely missing from toxicology, which is the science of understanding the effects of poisons on life, particularly human life.Monosson, who spoke Thursday at Harvard’s Haller Hall in an event sponsored by the Harvard Museum of Natural History, said lessons from our evolutionary past that might help us avoid trouble have been ignored by toxicologists and industry alike.Monosson said she wrote the book in an effort to get toxicologists to think differently about their field, which she said still uses tools that are 40 years old and badly need updating.“The basic point of doing this book is to get toxicologists to look differently at our field,” Monosson said. “Toxicology needs to change.”Examples abound on the ramifications of rapid evolution, she said. Bacteria reproduce so fast that they quickly evolve resistance to drugs used to treat disease, resulting in frightening new ailments such as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Similarly, insects can rapidly evolve resistance to pesticides, and weeds can evolve resistance to herbicides.“Roundup Ready” soybeans offer an example where a better understanding of the rapidity of evolution might have helped, Monosson said. The soybean was genetically modified to be resistant to the herbicide Roundup, which could then be sprayed on soybean fields, where it would kill weeds but not the soybeans. Officials believed that the weeds would not become resistant to Roundup. But after blanket applications, it appears that some resistance is evolving.Slow evolutionary change also holds lessons for toxicologists and industry, Monosson said. Estrogen receptors help to control the body’s use of the critical reproductive hormone. Some industrial chemicals bond with the receptor, widely disrupting reproduction of an array of creatures.Estrogen receptors are highly conserved, meaning they are widespread among many kinds of creatures and have changed extremely slowly over time, an indication of their evolutionary importance. An understanding of that importance would have helped officials predict that chemicals interfering with them would have widespread and deleterious environmental effects, Monosson said.“There’s a lot of problems we could have avoided if we understood the power of evolution in the presence of toxic chemicals,” Monosson said.It is unknown how humans today will respond to the many chemicals, usually at low levels, that our bodies are carrying. Some of these chemicals may be harmless alone but could have interactions with other chemicals in our bodies, Monosson said.“Those chemicals in us today weren’t in our grandparents,” Monosson said. “If we take an evolutionary approach to understand how systems evolved to detoxify chemicals, maybe we can learn how to do it [ourselves].”A toxic Earth is nothing new to life, Monosson said. When life began 3.8 billion years ago, there were poisons all around. Besides the presence of metals and other toxins in the environment, early microbes were bombarded from above. The early Earth had little oxygen in the atmosphere and no protective ozone layer to shield the microbes from ultraviolet (UV) rays.In response, early life evolved an enzyme, photolyase, to repair the UV damage to DNA. That enzyme, though lost in most mammals, remains widespread in other types of creatures.Another early example involved oxygen, which is very reactive and on the early Earth acted like a poison. Life has since evolved to handle and depend on oxygen. One strategy evolved to break down hydrogen peroxide, a highly toxic chemical that forms naturally in the presence of oxygen, water, and UV rays. Early life developed an enzyme called catalase to detoxify hydrogen peroxide, accelerating the natural breakdown process from weeks to a fraction of a second.In the future, climate change promises to alter the range of many creatures, putting them in new environments to which they’ll have to adapt. The ozone hole is exposing creatures to higher levels of UV radiation than they’re adapted to handle. And human-generated pollutants continue to be released into the environment, presenting an environmental challenge for a wide array of creatures.Some, like Hudson River fish that have evolved to thrive despite the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), will evolve their own solutions, but others may need human intervention to handle an environment whose toxicity is changing much more rapidly than in the past.“The problem today is that in a blink of time, we changed the Earth,” Monosson said. “We’ve added a lot of new synthetic chemicals and redistributed a lot of natural chemicals.”last_img read more

Australian batteries pushing coal out of frequency control market, saving customers money

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:The growth in number of big batteries in Australia’s main grid is displacing coal generation as a provider of frequency control and ancillary services (FCAS) markets, and helping reduce overall costs, according to the Australian Energy Market Operator.In its latest Quarterly Energy Dynamics report, AEMO says batteries have increased their share of key FCAS markets from 10 per cent in the last quarter of 2018 to 17 per cent in the first quarter of 2019, thanks to the recent addition of the Dalrymple battery storage plant in South Australia and the Ballarat battery storage facility in Victoria. Another interesting development is the increased share in the FCAS market for demand response services, which has upped its share from just under 10 per cent a year ago to 15 per cent now.That gives a 35 per cent share to “new technologies” and has in turn eaten into the share of the traditional coal generators, which have fallen from near 45 per cent to around 28 per cent.This – along with increased supply from hydro generators, including the Wivenhoe pumped storage supply in Queensland – helped overall costs fall by around 33 per cent from the last quarter to $36.4 million. Most of the cost reductions occurred in the contingency raise section of the FCAS market.AEMO notes that both pumped hydro and batteries have increased the amount of charging and pumping during the middle of the day, especially during the solar noon, soaking up the sponge of high solar output.Interestingly, batteries have also found a profitable new market during the morning (meeting early morning demand around 06:00-07:00), with both pumped hydro and batteries increasing generation during the evening peak.More: Big batteries displace coal, and lower costs in frequency markets Australian batteries pushing coal out of frequency control market, saving customers moneylast_img read more

Danish pension funds join global infrastructure-financing partnership

first_img“So we can fully endorse the basic idea behind the SDIP to find the right models for such financing for sustainable infrastructure in developing countries and emerging markets.”PKA said it needed to have effective financing models to get a good balance between risk and return when it came to developing countries.Besides the Danish pension funds, founding members of the partnership include the Danish Investment Fund for Developing Countries (IFU), Citi, Deutsche Bank, East Capital, Standard Chartered, Storebrand, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Development Bank of South Africa, International Finance Corporation and the Senegal Sovereign Wealth Fund (FONSIS). The governments of Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the US and the UK are also among the founders.The World Economic Forum said it and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) were providing the partnership with institutional support.The SDIP aims to create investment opportunities in water, sanitation, transport, green energy, agriculture, health, telecommunications and climate adaptation in developing countries, the World Economic Forum said.Even though expected returns on investment and long-term cash flows offered in emerging markets are higher than in the industrialised world, infrastructure investments in developing countries are held back by political and financial risks, it said. The forum said the partnership would mobilise such investment by “improving and enhancing risk-mitigation tools to reduce political, regulatory, credit, currency and liquidity threats”.Richard Samans, head of the Centre for the Global Agenda, and member of the World Economic Forum’s managing board, said: “Expanding public/private cooperation in the form of blended finance is one of the most important ways the international community can support developing countries as they seek to generate the very large amount of domestic and foreign investment required to meet their sustainable development goals by 2030.”Nellemann Pedersen said PKA had seen that public/private partnership models for infrastructure financing worked well in more traditional financial markets when it came to large investments. “Such models are beneficial for all parties involved, and it is right to expand them to developing countries, which in many areas are in need of long-term capital,” he said. Two of Denmark’s large labour-market pension funds – PKA and PensionDanmark – are among the governments, banks and other organisations to launch an international project aimed at “mobilising” $100bn (€92bn) in private financing over the next five years for infrastructure in developing countries. The project, named the Sustainable Development Investment Partnership (SDIP), was announced as part of the United Nations-sponsored Financing for Development conference now taking place in Addis Ababa.The parties involved are not pledging to provide the investment but rather to work to make the conditions more attractive for the private sector to get involved, by reducing political, currency, regulatory and other risks.Michael Nellemann Pedersen, head of investment at PKA, said: “At COP15 in Copenhagen (the 2009 UN Climate Change Conference), it was decided that industrialised countries should mobilise $100bn a year for climate-related investments in developing countries.last_img read more

Jagielka hopeful of top-four spot

first_img Saturday’s 1-0 victory over Stoke courtesy of Kevin Mirallas’ 70-yard run and finish built on the win over defending Barclays Premier League champions Manchester City before the international break. The Toffees are now only four points adrift of the top four, and Jagielka said: “We’d like to think we can prolong the chase as long as possible. If we’re going into the final game of the season still in with a chance of Champions League football then we have to look at that as a fantastic season.” Press Association Defender Phil Jagielka is confident Everton can push their rivals for a Champions League place right up until the final day of the season.center_img He went on: “Unfortunately for us it is a season when five or six teams at the top rather than two or three are performing well. “It seems like Spurs have played well again and won, Arsenal have so everyone seems to be desperate for that fourth spot and we’re desperate to be in there as long as possible. “You can only work with what you are given and I am sure the manager would have loved to have had a lot of money in the January window when we were up there in a better position (they were in the top four in late December) than we are now. “But it is hard to wish for things which are not going to happen. “The manager has got the players he’s got, he has done the best he has with the players he has got in and when I look around the dressing room I’m happy with the players we have trying to get us into fourth spot. “We are – as far as spending is concerned – a little bit below the other teams but I am sure they won’t look forward to playing us as much as we are looking forward to playing them.” last_img read more